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MessageSujet: Catholic daily prayers    Mar 7 Jan - 2:53

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MessageSujet: Re: Catholic daily prayers    Mar 7 Jan - 2:54

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MessageSujet: Re: Catholic daily prayers    Mar 7 Jan - 2:55

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MessageSujet: Re: Catholic daily prayers    Mar 7 Jan - 2:55


THE APOSTLES' CREED


The Apostles' Creed, an important prayer which begins the Rosary, can
be traced in its present form back to around the 7th or 8th century AD. It appeared in slightly different forms in documents as early as the year 200 AD. Although this prayer was probably not composed as we know it by the Apostles themselves, it nonetheless reflects their teachings, as well as those found in the New Testament.

The Apostles' Creed is divided into what we refer to as 12 articles.
Like the Nicene Creed that we recite at Mass, it is a solid profession of the fundamental truths of our faith: p.leftmargin {margin-left: 0cm}

I believe in God, the Father Almighty,
Creator of heaven and earth; (The 1st article)
And in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord; (The 2nd)
Who was conceived by the Holy Spirit,
Born of the Virgin Mary, (The 3rd)
Suffered under Pontius Pilate,
Was crucified, died, and was buried. (The 4th)
He descended into hell;
The third day he rose again from the dead; (The 5th)
He ascended into Heaven,
And is seated at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty;
(The 6th)
From thence he shall come to judge the living and the dead.
(The 7th)
I believe in the Holy Spirit, (The 8th)
The Holy Catholic Church,
The Communion of Saints, (The 9th)
The forgiveness of sins, (The 10th)
The resurrection of the body, (The 11th)
And life everlasting. Amen. (The 12th)

It’s hard to summarize the Apostles' Creed in a few short paragraphs.
The current Cathecism of the Catholic Church offers some 200-plus pages of excellent analysis of this prayer. The earlier Roman Cathecism (known also as the Cathecism of the Council of Trent, from the 16th century)
goes to similar lengths! Still there are a few points worth mentioning on some of the articles.

Although the Apostles' Creed covers Christ's life in a short summary, it by no means slights the Father or the Holy Spirit! Indeed, in the first article we affirm our faith in the God the Father. He is the first person of One God that has existed throughout eternity in the Holy Trinity, in three coequal persons, the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit:

•The Father as Creator;
•The Son as the begotten Word made flesh and our Redeemer; and
•The Holy Spirit as the one who proceeds from the Father and Son and can help us attain the essential attributes of holiness.
(These include what we call the seven gifts of the Holy Spirit: wisdom, understanding, knowledge, counsel fortitude, piety, and fear of the Lord.)

In the first few centuries of the Church, some people couldn’t quite grasp the concept of the Holy Trinity and sought to refute either Christ's divinity or His humanity.

We see this today in books such as The Da Vinci Code which imply that His divinity was a fourth century fabrication. Nothing could be further from the truth! One can look at such works as Amy Welborn’s best seller de-coding Da Vinci for quite a few facts debunking this claim, (de-bunking Da Vinci, as it were)!

As St. Peter wrote in one of his New Testament letters “We have not by following artificial fables made known to you the power, and presence of our Lord Jesus Christ; but we were eyewitnesses of his greatness” (2 Peter 1:16).

He described in further detail in this letter our Lord’s transfiguration once
in which He appeared to be "shining, exceedingly white as snow" while conversing with Moses and Elijah (Mark 9:2-4).

St. John, for his part, mentioned signs Jesus showed of his divinity in his Gospel, “that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that believing you may have life in his name.” (John 20:31)

(So much for Our Lord’s just being some wise philosopher, as some people would have you believe these days!)


St. Thomas Aquinas, in a lengthy commentary on the Apostles' Creed, noted concerning the third article (concerning Our Lord’s conception and birth) that Jesus “became man that He might make man divine.”

He also pointed out in referring to the articles in the Apostles' Creed concerning Jesus's suffering, death, and glorious ascension into Heaven (Articles 4-6) that these events took place in accordance with His own will and by His own power, for our sake.

(The Ascension of our Lord is depicted in this painting at left by the Northern Italian painter Andrea Mantegna from the 15th Century.)

As Jesus put it in John’s Gospel: “I lay down my life that I may take it up again. No one takes it from me, but I lay it down of myself. I have the power to lay it down, and
I have the power to take it up again.” (John 10:17-18)

The line in the fifth Apostles' Creed article “He descended into hell” is also written in some sources as “He descended to the dead.” This refers not only to the place of eternal torment of the damned that we rightly dread, but also in this specific instance to a more benign place for the souls of the just who had died before Jesus.

Our Lord opened the gates of Heaven for them upon His death and resurrection. (And, indeed, those gates are open for all of us who die in a state of grace, free from mortal sin, to join Him in Eternal Life!)

Jesus's place at the right hand of the Father, in Article 6 of the Apostles' Creed, is meant to show us His special place with His Heavenly Father as one with Him, in a manner that we can understand as human beings. St. Paul makes reference to this when he urges us to “seek the things that are above; where Christ is sitting at the right hand of God” (3 Col. 3:1).

It also highlights our Lord's role as the one mediator between God and Man. Who better to bridge the gap between us and our Creator than God Himself in the person of His Son! Indeed, through Jesus we can call God the Father Our Father, as we say in the Lord's Prayer.

In article 7 of the Apostles' Creed, note that Christ will return and will judge all of us, living and dead, in the Last Judgment, separating the sheep from the goats (Matt. 25:32-33), the just from the wicked, as it were. The former will have eternal Life and joy in Heaven (touching on Article 12 here) and the latter will be in eternal misery in Hell.

This general judgment will basically reaffirm the particular judgment
each of us will receive upon our death, as to whether or not our ultimate destination is Heaven or Hell. This will be based on our actions in this life (in what we have done and what we have failed to do, as we say at Mass) and on how receptive we have been to God's graces.

We need not fear this judgment. We must prepare for it by living lives of faith, love and obedience to God. Having a strong prayer life can be a great help in this regard!

The subsequent articles of the Apostles' Creed follow a natural sequence. The Holy Spirit guides and instructs the Catholic Church, from which comes the Communion of Saints (Articles 8 and 9). This includes those of us in the Church living on earth, those in purgatory, and all those in Heaven.

Thus the Communion of Saints follows from the Church which follows from its founder, Our Lord Jesus Christ, through the Holy Spirit. (Jesus himself sent the Holy Spirit, whom He called the paraclete, to help build His church.)

Likewise, when God forgives us our sins (Article 10 of the Apostles'
Creed) in the Church's sacrament of penance we may better merit the “resurrection of the body” (Article 11) in which we will be raised up to Heaven, with our glorified bodies united with our souls, at the Last Judgment.

Let us all pray to live our lives, with God's help and grace, in such a manner that at our death, as we read in the famous prayer Anima Christi, He might summon us so that with His saints we may praise Him forever in the bliss of heaven. Talk about life everlasting (article 12)! This wonderful hope for an Eternity of Love in the peace of Christ makes a fitting end to the Apostles' Creed.
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MessageSujet: Re: Catholic daily prayers    Mar 7 Jan - 2:56

Do you know you’ve been given a very special gift? It’s faith! The Act of Faith prayer captures its essence. With faith God gives each of us supernatural grace to trust in Him and in His word completely.

We give Him our will and intellect so as to better love Him, as Jesus commanded us, with all our heart, soul and mind.

Doesn’t it feel good when you know can count on someone when they give you their word? Well, God has given us His word, as truth! (His word even became flesh in the person of His Son, Our Lord Jesus Christ!)

In faith we trust in Him not blindly but with confidence that in a world full of falsehoods, He’s the real deal! The Act of Faith prayer printed below acknowledges this. It can help recharge your spiritual batteries.

O my God, I firmly believe that you are one God in three Divine Persons, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit; I believe that your Divine Son became man, and died for our sins, and that He will come to judge the living and the dead. I believe these and all the truths the Holy Catholic Church teaches because You have revealed them, who can neither deceive nor be deceived.

(Note that in many prayer books the Act of Faith prayer is called simply "An Act of Faith.")

The Catechism of the Catholic Church calls the gift of faith essential for our salvation. After all, as St. Paul once noted, how can we please God (and one day share eternal life with Him!) if we don’t believe in Him and in His word? Our Creator calls each of us to be with Him but we must answer. Faith is like a wonderful flower that needs to be nurtured every day.

We can keep our faith strong though prayers, the sacraments, studying God’s word in scripture and in commentary, and in letting His love shine through us in our day-to-day lives. Even the smallest chore we do can be done as an act of faith if we’re trying to do God’s will!

God in His generosity has given us two other gifts to help us with our faith, those of hope and love. All three are called theological virtues, each with its own prayer.

In the Gospels, our Lord was constantly stressing the importance of faith in Him. In Matthew 17:19, He noted that even faith the size of a mustard seed could move mountains! He inspired all of us Doubting Thomases when He told the original one, His apostle Thomas, after His resurrection: “Because thou hast seen me, thou hast believed. Blessed are they who have not seen, and yet have believed” (John 20:29).

Still, sometimes it’s easier to believe in God than to trust in Him and ask for His guidance each day. How many control freaks do you know? Do you see one in the mirror? Jesus addressed us all, “O you of little faith,” in the Sermon on the Mount when He asked his listeners to “seek first the kingdom of God and his justice and all these things [our daily needs] shall be given you” (Matt 6:33).

Faith in God doesn’t guarantee us a free ride in this world, by any means! Yet how many times have you seen on TV (or read in newspapers) stories about families beset by accidents, illnesses or other major disruptions in their lives who say that their faith in God pulled them through?

Many of the Church’s great saints (as well as our Lord on the Cross!) experienced times of spiritual dryness or despair, feeling that perhaps
God had abandoned them, or that their efforts were all for nothing. Yet their unconditional faith and love for God sustained them like a light shining through the darkness.

Remember that just as God is light and truth, Satan, “the father of lies,”
as Jesus called him in John 8:44, tries to snare us with temptations into darkness and despair.

Tragically, along these lines, our lack of faith contributes to most of the chaos and carnage we see on TV or read about these days. Yet Jesus himself said that “he who follows me does not walk in the darkness, but will have the light of life” (John 8:12).

The Act of Faith’s reference to truths brings to mind some poignant
Gospel passages: Jesus calls Himself “the way, the truth and the life”
in John 14:6.

Later Our Lord tells Pontius Pilate during His Passion “For this was I born, and for this came I into the world; that I should give testimony to the truth.” Pilate’s answer is one with which we are all too familiar with nowadays in our morally relativistic world: “What is truth?” (John 17:38-39).

How many times do we feel our faith challenged in that manner by others in trying situations? The Act of Faith reminds us that God’s word is indeed truth!

Note also that Jesus meant for His Church to teach the truths He revealed, with the help of the Holy Spirit “whom the Father will send in my name, will teach you all things, and bring to your mind, whatever I have said to you” (John 14:26). This is a great example of God in three Divine persons working together as one!

Our Creator is always there for us and wants us to turn to Him daily for spiritual nourishment on our Heavenward path. We don’t get all the answers in this life, as we “walk by faith, not by sight,” as St. Paul wrote (2 Cor 5:7).

The Resurrection, courtesy of Wikipedia
Indeed, the Act of Faith is a prayer that includes elements of what is called the mystery of faith that we proclaim at Mass: Christ’s death, (along with His resurrection, depicted in the painting at right), and His certain return.

What needn’t be a mystery in any case is Christ’s crucial role in our salvation. The Act of Faith invites us to accept the necessity of our Lord’s sacrifice for us in His passion when it reminds us that He died for our sins.

He couldn’t just “come down from the cross,” as many taunted Him to do during His crucifixion, and still fill the needs of Divine justice as well as mercy!

Speaking of the cross, it is important for us to remember that God is often closest to us when difficulties arise. He’s ready to help us carry our crosses if we let Him.

St. Thomas Aquinas once noted that “the world tempts us, either by seducing us with its vanities or by terrifying us with its misfortunes.” Still, he continued, faith in God and in the promises of Heaven can help us overcome these temptations!

Isn’t it good to know God loves us so much that He’s with us in our struggles and ready to help us through them if we turn to Him in faith? And also, that “better things are awaiting us,” in any case, as Aquinas said? May this thought, and this prayer, help you to live your life as an act of faith!
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MessageSujet: Re: Catholic daily prayers    Mar 7 Jan - 2:57


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AN ACT OF HOPE

Picture of a double rainbow courtesy of Istockphoto.com


God has a great gift of grace for you! It’s hope! The Act of Hope prayer below reminds us that with God there’s no place for despair, no matter what life throws at us. There’s not only a light at the end of the tunnel but, as the saying goes, “the future’s so bright I gotta wear shades!”

If, as Christ said, “with God all things are possible,” (Matt.19:26), hope reminds us that with God’s help all things are bearable! The Act of Hope prayer sums up the essentials of this grace in one tidy sentence.

O my God, relying on Your almighty power and infinite mercy and promises, I hope to obtain pardon of my sins, the help of Your grace, and life everlasting, through the merits of Jesus Christ, my Lord and Redeemer.

(Note that in many books this prayer is called simply “An Act of Hope.”)

Hope is a virtue that focuses our desire for happiness into seeking eternal happiness with God in Heaven. In doing His will in our lives out of love for Him and for our neighbors, we strive for “life everlasting” (as the Act of Hope prayer puts it) with God in His heavenly kingdom.

If we seek God’s grace, through prayer and the sacraments, we have great hope, that “does not disappoint,” as St. Paul put it (Rom 5:5), of sharing eternal life with Him!

As St. Paul wrote of the heavenly kingdom awaiting us, “Eye has not seen nor ear heard…what God has prepared for those who love him” (1 Cor 2:9). With hope for the next life, we are much less likely to be discouraged in this one, as we keep our eyes on our true home in Heaven! Hope is a powerful weapon in our spiritual arsenal against darkness and negativity.

God in His generosity has given us two other gifts, faith and love, to help us in our hope. All three are called theological virtues, and each has its own prayer!

The Catechism of the Catholic Church points out that prayer nourishes and expresses hope. Prayer helps dig out the weeds of gloom in our souls in God’s garden of grace.

Watch out for the two sins against hope, however. Don’t let your emotions take you on a roller coaster ride between presumption (assuming God will save you, no matter what, and that you don’t need His help) and despair (assuming God won’t save you, no matter what, and thus that you can’t ask for His help).

Try to keep on an even keel. Keep close to God in prayer and humility. And remember to “have reasonable hope of gaining salvation, but do not act as though you were certain of it lest you grow indolent and proud,” as Thomas a Kempis advises us in the spiritual classic The Imitation of Christ.

Note that the Act of Hope brings up a crucial point in its reference to Jesus as our Redeemer. St. Paul mentions, in his letter to the Romans that “we were reconciled to God by the death of his Son” (Rom 5:10). In dying for our sins Christ redeemed us for our salvation!

Even better, by His death and resurrection Jesus enabled us to become God’s adopted children! As St. Paul also noted, we can now call our Heavenly Father “Abba” (Rom 8:16). (No, not as in the rock group, but rather as an affectionate name in Aramaic, the language spoken in Jesus’ time, for Father! Bishop Fulton Sheen once compared the term to “Daddy”.) Hope in eternal life with God as part of His “family” increases
our joy in good times and strengthens our endurance in bad.

Speaking of redemption, it is worth noting that John Cardinal O’Connor found “new and wonderful hope” as Advent approached one year in reflecting on the fact that Jesus came to redeem not just all mankind but each one of us personally.

We can also have great hope and confidence in God’s grace and mercy
when we sincerely ask Him to pardon our sins. You can do that by going to confession on a regular basis, reciting the Act of Contrition, and generally seeking God’s help in temptations through prayer. The important thing is to approach Him with humility, not despair, when you slip and fall!

And in those dark times, remember what Jesus told His apostles at the Last Supper: “Let not your heart be troubled. You believe in God, believe also in me. In my Father's house there are many mansions. If not, I would have told you: because I go to prepare a place for you” (John 14:1-2).

St. Pio’s famous spiritual maxim along this line was “Pray, hope and don’t worry.” If we can just live our day-to-day lives serving God and our neighbors with love that is its own act of hope indeed
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MessageSujet: Re: Catholic daily prayers    Mar 7 Jan - 2:58


Home
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AN ACT OF LOVE




How’s your love life? Spiritually speaking, that is! The Act of Love prayer gets right to the heart of the matter as to what really counts as love in
God’s eyes:

O my God, I love you above all things, with my whole heart and soul, because you are all-good and worthy of all love. I love my neighbor as myself for the love of you. I forgive all who have injured me, and I ask pardon of all whom I have injured.

(Note that in many books this prayer is called simply “An Act of Love”.)

These three sentences challenge us to think about real love in a way the world around us doesn’t! The Act of Love prayer brings to mind our Lord’s two great commandments to us, expressed in the Gospels: “Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with thy whole heart, and with thy whole soul, and with thy whole mind [and] thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself” (Matt 22:37, 39).

(Note that these by no means superseded the original Ten Commandments but were meant to summarize their essence! We show our love of God in our obedience to His commandments.)

Jesus made it very clear many times in the Gospels, and in the Lord’s Prayer, that we show our love for Him in how we treat other people, and that He will forgive us as much as we forgive them. Also, we must not poison our relationships with others by being too proud to apologize when we have wronged them.

God’s idea of love is not the same as that expressed in too many songs and TV programs these days, all about sex and self-gratification. The love He seeks from us, and asks us to give others, is an agape love (from the Greek term), one intimately mingled with charity.

This love is one of God’s gifts to us. It is one of three theological virtues, along with faith and hope, each with their own prayer! Often referred to as “charity” in traditional translations of the Bible, it consists of loving God, as the Act of Love prayer states “above all things,” and loving our neighbor out of love for Him.

It doesn’t come from our feelings, that is to say, from our natural likes and dislikes, but rather from our will in our desire to please God.

This is indeed love of others for God’s sake without thinking about what we might get in return. In addition, we are called to love those who might not seem particularly loveable, as well as our enemies.

In case the notion of loving your enemies seems like too tall an order in a world saturated with conflict, consider that, as St. Paul said, Christ died for us to reconcile us to God while we were His enemies (Rom 5:10). Christ’s love for us on this earth was modeled on humility and selflessness. He was born in a manger and died on a cross in the ultimate act of love!

As our Lord instructed His Apostles the night before His Passion, we are to “love one another, as I have loved you …by this shall all men know that you are my disciples” (John 13:34-35). He meant for us to love each other, warts and all!

St. Therese was so taken by this command in John’s Gospel that she dedicated her life to loving others as Jesus would love them. She wanted everything she did to be an act of love! That included looking for the good in everyone, putting up with their faults, and showing those she might otherwise find disagreeable kindness and respect.

Following this example, if we can’t always settle our differences with others we can at least pray for them and pray that we might not have bitterness or resentment in our hearts towards them.

While this might be especially difficult in cases of severe emotional or physical abuse, think of those more mundane situations in your life when pettiness gets the better of you. Do you know someone who just has to be right about everything? Are you like that?

Also, how much does it (or even should it) matter who has the bigger car, house, or wallet? Don’t forget the emotional, physical, as well as spiritual toll envy and resentment can have on us. Even the small grudges we carry around with us can feel like 50 pound weights after a while!

Although the Act of Love prayer invites us to think of “we” in a world of “me,” it is important for us to love ourselves as children of God seeking to do His work by sharing His love and goodness! We must avoid the kind of sensual, prideful self-love in which we’re always looking out for #1, thinking only of ourselves.

The renowned English poet W.H. Auden summed up the tragedy of the human condition in this regard when he wrote when World War II began:

The error bred in the bone
Of each woman and each man
Craves what it cannot have,
Not universal love
But to be loved alone.
Many times when we think of “universal love” in the abstract, we get tripped up as well. Linus once said in a old Peanuts comic strip “I love mankind, it’s people I can’t stand!” Likewise, the satirist Tom Lehrer once said only somewhat tongue-in-cheek that “I know that there are people who do not love their fellow man, and I hate people like that!”

Don’t we all fall prey to those kinds of thoughts sometimes? Do you find it’s easier to champion some abstract cause than to be polite under stress, or not to bear grudges in turf wars with colleagues at work? You're not alone!

Speaking of being alone, paraphrasing Auden above, we are not to love God alone, in the sense of trying to keep Him all to ourselves in our spiritual lives, while having a condescending or unforgiving attitude towards those around us.

St. Paul said in this regard that if he “should know all mysteries, and all knowledge, and if I should have all faith, so that I could remove mountains, and have not charity [the traditional term for agape love, as mentioned earlier], I am nothing” (1 Cor 13: 2).

We must also beware of gossip, which affects, and indeed infects us all, one way or another. It can be an act of love not to spread or repeat rumors or otherwise ruin someone’s reputation. St. James called the tongue “an unquiet evil, full of deadly poison” when used in this manner (James 3:Cool.

Mahatma Gandhi once said that “I like your Christ but I dislike your Christians. They are so unlike your Christ.” While we might find that assessment harsh, it nonetheless points up one of our great challenges in living our faith: Are we showing others Jesus in our lives by our actions? Are we letting Him work through us?

Most of the times what drives us most crazy is each other! God invites us to live in a world much more at peace than this one, here as well as in heaven.

The Act of Love prayer points the way to that world. St. Paul reminds us in his first letter to the Corinthians (1 Cor 13:7), as you might have heard read in weddings, that love is patient, kind, gentle, unpretentious, not ambitious or self-seeking, and that it doesn’t bear grudges or rejoice in someone else’s misfortunes.

The more we can adopt that approach, with God’s help, the more we can live our lives as an act of love for Him and for each other. Then, we might be able to rejoice along with the author of Psalm 133 when he said (in verse 1) “Behold how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell in unity!”
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MessageSujet: Re: Catholic daily prayers    Jeu 23 Jan - 11:26

prayer at the breakfast table

Our Dear Heavenly and Gracious Father, thank you Lord for a good day, for protecting us against powers, principalities, evil forces in this world and spiritual wickedness in high places. Now Lord, we apply the blood over and bind Satan away from us, Marie, Nathan, Nat and Natasha, our jobs and our clients, Manna Baptist Church, Lake Hamilton Bible Camp, Chapel on the Campus, A " E Testing, our possessions and everything that we have any part in. Lord send your angels to minister unto us, build a ring of Holy Ghost Fire around us and cover us with Your Blood. We pray for the United States of America and Israel, the Christians and the Jews, the churches that worship Jesus in spirit and truth.

We ask for courage, understanding, wisdom and strength. We pray especially for the leaders and ask a double portion for our families. We ask divine favor with You in accordance with the Holy Word of God, with each other and those we come into contact with today. We confess that this is the day that the Lord has made. We will rejoice and be glad in it for God has not given us a spirit of fear but of power, love and a sound mind. He that is in us is greater than he that is in the world. If God be for us, who can be against us? You have given us power over all the power of the enemy and we intend to exercise it by the leadership of the Holy Spirit. Now Lord, we ask that you lead, guide, direct and protect us. Let us walk in your perfect will; we yield ourselves to you today. We thank you for our food, clothing and shelter, for everything that you have done for us known and unknown. We ask you to bless this food to our bodies, purify and cleanse it so that our temples will be fit for the Holy Spirit to reside in. All these things we ask in the Blessed Name of Jesus Christ, our Lord, Master and Savior.

Amen.


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MessageSujet: Re: Catholic daily prayers    Jeu 23 Jan - 11:26

Prayer for the day

Dear Lord, we ask you to forgive us of our sins, teach us and show us so that we will be pleasing in your sight. We pray for ourselves, Marie, Nathan, Nat and Natasha, this day and the leadership of the Holy Spirit. We thank you for each other, this day and most of all for You. We pray for our relatives and friends, our Christian brothers and sisters.

We pray for those who labor in the field of deliverance, for their families, churches and ministries that You would give them a triple-fold portion of courage, understanding, wisdom and strength. We pray for the Army of the Lord that it would grow strong and mighty and be valiant and do exploits in the Name of Jesus Christ. We pray that deliverance would come to the forefront of Christianity. We pray for those that we have ministered to, for their families, churches and ministries that they would go on with the Lord. We pray for all men everywhere that they would come into the saving knowledge of Jesus Christ. We pray for Manna Baptist Church: Butch and Lois; Lake Hamilton Bible Camp: Glen and Erma; Chapel on the Campus: Donald and Mary. We pray for the five-fold ministry, for their families, churches and ministries. We pray for A " E Testing and for our business. We pray Your Blessings on these. We bind up all powers, principalities, evil forces in this world and spiritual wickedness in high places. We lose the powers of God: warring angels, ministering angels, Holy Spirit and the Seven-Fold Spirit of God to come down and do a mighty battle on earth today. We bind up every force of evil and loose every force of good that we have the power and authority to do so in Jesus' Name. We thank you Lord for power and authority over the enemy, and the use of the Name of Jesus Christ for its in His Name we pray. Amen.


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Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: Catholic daily prayers    Jeu 23 Jan - 11:26

DAILY PRAYERS

PRAYER IN A RESTAURANT

Our Dear Heavenly and Gracious Father, thank You Lord for this food. Bless, purify and cleanse it so that we can be fit temples for the Holy Spirit to reside in. We break any curses on it and eat it with thanksgiving. For it's in Jesus' Name we pray. Amen.
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Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: Catholic daily prayers    Jeu 23 Jan - 11:27

daily prayers

The Lord's prayer

Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name.

Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.

Give us this day our daily bread.

And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors.

And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil:

For thine is the kingdom and the power, and the glory, for ever. Amen.
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MessageSujet: Re: Catholic daily prayers    Aujourd'hui à 1:52

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