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Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: Meat    Ven 7 Sep - 2:38

Noticia del 05 de noviembre de 2008 :

‘Kentucky Fried Cruelty’ with Pamela Anderson

KFC suppliers cram birds into huge waste-filled factories, breed and drug them to grow so large that they can’t even walk, and often break their wings and legs. At slaughter, the birds’ throats are slit and they are dropped into tanks of scalding-hot water—often while they are still conscious. It would be illegal for KFC to abuse dogs, cats, pigs, or cows in these ways. KFC’s own animal welfare advisors have asked the company to take steps to eliminate these abuses, but KFC refuses to do so. Many advisors have now resigned in frustration. Please join Pamela Anderson, Sir Paul McCartney, His Holiness the Dalai Lama, The Rev. Al Sharpton, and countless other kind people worldwide by not eating at KFC.

http://www.kentuckyfriedcruelty.com/
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MessageSujet: Re: Meat    Ven 7 Sep - 2:39

Noticia del 24 de noviembre de 2008 :

Thanksgiving provides us with an opportunity to consider the things that make each of us grateful. I am grateful for all that you do to help end the suffering of animals. Today, I am asking you to do a little more. As you prepare to sit down with friends and family this Thursday, I'd like to ask you to please take a moment to make a tax-deductible gift to help the more than 72 million individual turkeys who will be slaughtered for America's holiday dinners in the coming days and weeks. :

https://ibiz.isiservices.com/peta-e/peta/donation.asp?section_code=H08X175P&ask4=--25-35-50-100-o

Last week, I told you about PETA's new undercover investigation into the turkey industry. The cruelty that our investigator found during his two months at a series of Aviagen turkey farms in West Virginia was heartbreaking. Our investigator documented the following:

Workers admitted to killing turkeys with 2-by-4s and pipes, and workers attempted to kill birds by twisting and bending the animals' necks, sometimes repeatedly. Turkeys were routinely kicked and thrown, and employees even stomped on birds' heads. The decomposing remains of roughly 70 hens were left to rot among live birds—who had to climb over the dead—for more than 24 hours. No animal should suffer like this for a holiday. The public outcry over what this investigation uncovered has been massive. Major media outlets, including The New York Times, USA Today, and the Associated Press, have helped to expose the shocking cruelty that dominates the short, miserable lives of the turkeys who will be killed this holiday season
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MessageSujet: Re: Meat    Ven 7 Sep - 2:58

While the media attention that this case has generated is important, it falls to you and me, as caring and compassionate individuals, to help ensure that turkeys, chickens, and countless other animals are no longer condemned to the abusive conditions that PETA's investigator has exposed to the world. We need to have the resources to take advantage of this momentum and to make sure that real change takes place on turkey and chicken factory farms.

By making a special holiday gift today, you will help us to ensure that those responsible for the horrific abuses witnessed inside these factory farms are held accountable, and you'll make our efforts to achieve lasting reform throughout the industry possible. No bird should ever have to suffer like the turkeys abused at Aviagen.

We still have a lot of work to do for animals. I hope that you will give whatever you can to help end their suffering. Even in this difficult economic climate, each of us has much to be grateful for.

For all that you do for animals this holiday season and beyond, thank you.

Eating turkeys or other animals supports the horrific abuse that this investigation has uncovered. By planning a cruelty-free holiday dinner this week, you'll be showing your friends and loved ones that delicious food doesn't have to come at the expense of animals

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MessageSujet: Re: Meat    Ven 7 Sep - 2:58

The Danger of Meat-Heavy Diets

By Kathy Freston, AlterNet. Posted July 29, 2008.

The Atkins, eat-lots-of-meat diet is about as unhealthy as they come. But you'd never know it from media coverage.
You may have seen recent news articles claiming that a study out of Israel found that the Atkins diet is more effective for losing weight and improving cholesterol levels than a low-fat diet. Unfortunately, the headlines completely misrepresented the study. First, the "low-fat" diet that was compared to the high-protein one in this study was a full 30 percent fat, which is not low-fat as the phrase is used by any of the top nutritionists and scientists who are effectively using low-fat diets to help people lose weight, keep it off and improve their health. Second, the study organizers encourage people to eat vegetarian protein sources, not the animal products encouraged by Atkins and South Beach. I don't know about you, but it seems amiss to me for the media to portray this as a pro-Atkins study, since most of us consider Atkins to be meat-based. Shouldn't the media help us to better understand the science? (By the way, the foundation of the guy who originated the Atkins Diet provided most of the funding for the study. That's always a red flag for possibly biased science.)

Best-selling health writer and nutrition guru Dr. Dean Ornish wrote a good explanation for Newsweek on why the reporting on this study was really quite misleading; he does his usual excellent job of explaining what's so, as he did in the foreword to his brilliant best-seller, Eat More, Weigh Less.

I am reminded of the fact that it's been three years since Atkins Nutritionals filed for bankruptcy. And if your local grocery market is like mine, those once-omnipresent packaged foods with the "no-carb" labels are now harder and harder to find -- with good reason, it seems to me.

While the South Beach Diet books and foods haven't gone away, probably because it gets some things right (i.e., it recommends less meat and cutting out simple carbohydrates -- both excellent pieces of advice), its popularity should wane as the scientific consensus grows that if you want to maintain a healthy weight and fight off disease, the best diet is a truly low-fat diet (more like 10 to 15 percent of calories from fat) based almost exclusively on whole grains, legumes, fruits and vegetables. The South Beach diet is certainly a big improvement on the standard American diet (rightly called SAD), but it's a half-measure, as Ornish and others are teaching us. Indeed, if food industry statistics, celebrity interest and the success of books like Skinny Bitch and (OK, here's a little self-promotion!) my own Quantum Wellness: A Practical and Spiritual Guide to Health and Happiness are any indication, there's a growing shift toward healthy, plant-based diets, especially among people looking to lose weight and keep it off.

All of this is music to the ears of independent, qualified nutrition experts, who object to the "low-carb" diets. I'm not going to overload you with a tome of scientific evidence about why low-carb diets are bad for us. If you are looking for more in-depth information on the topic, I highly recommend checking out http://www.atkinsdietalert.org. Run by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, the Web site documents the health consequences of diets high in animal flesh, eggs and dairy, and lists the long history of grave concerns raised by medical experts, including an American Dietetic Association spokesperson calling Atkins "a nightmare diet." The experts' concerns are really basic common sense if you ask me, but sometimes common sense gets swept away by a combination of wishful thinking and impressive marketing. Basically, every reputable health agency knows that a mountain of evidence indicates that the saturated fat and cholesterol in animal flesh, eggs and milk clogs your arteries and increases your risk of heart disease, among an array of other problems.

Heart disease is of course just one meat-related health problem; eating animals also raises one's risk of cancer. For example, a massive Harvard study in 2006 found that people who frequently eat skinless chicken (often touted as the "healthy" way to cook chicken) had a whopping 52 percent higher rate of bladder cancer. The evidence that animal protein is carcinogenic is strong, and people who eat lots of it are raising their risk. Diabetes and high blood pressure are also linked to meat-heavy diets, and vegetarian diets are far outpacing those that include meat on an array of health-related issues, as I've discussed previously.

Yet another reason low-carb diets are going through tough times is that people are realizing that these diets do not work over the long run. As with any unhealthy, severely limiting diets, you'll lose weight over the short term (if you eat just grapefruit, you'll also lose weight). But eventually the body objects to any unsound quick fix and the weight creeps back, as Dr. Ornish explains so eloquently.

So what is someone who wants to lose weight supposed to do? The answer is fairly simple: Switch to a diet made up of a diverse selection of foods: vegetables, whole grains (we should skip the refined carbs -- South Beach gets that right), beans, chickpeas, nuts, fruit, lentils, etc. A wide array of evidence shows that vegans are less likely to be overweight or obese than meat-eaters are -- because it's not a diet, it's a lifestyle transition. Because these foods are less calorie-dense and lower in fat than animal products, and because all plant foods contain zero cholesterol, eating that way allows us to shed weight in a sustainable way.

And a well-rounded vegan diet will provide us with a healthy mixture of complex carbs, protein and healthy fats, as well as vitamins, minerals and fiber. Because most nutrition advice is aimed at meat-eaters, it's worth reading up a bit on how to maximize the health advantages of a vegan diet; I like the Optimal Vegan Nutrition Web page. And of course we shouldn't think that our healthy new diet means giving up tasty food -- Web sites and cookbooks with thousands of delicious vegan recipes abound. Eating should be a celebration -- and we should do it joyfully, like the French and others in the Mediterranean do.

A shorter version of this article appeared in the HuffingtonPost.com.
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MessageSujet: Re: Meat    Ven 7 Sep - 2:59

Getting Past the 'Protein Myth' That Keeps People from Quitting Meat and Dairy

By Kathy Freston, Huffington Post. Posted June 3, 2008.

The way Americans obsess about protein, you'd think protein deficiency was the number one health problem in America. Of course it's not.
When I tell people that I'm a vegan, the most popular question, by far, inevitably follows: "But, how do you get enough protein?"

There it is again, I think, the meat industry's most potent weapon against vegetarianism -- the protein myth. And it is just that -- a myth.

In fact, humans need only 10 percent of the calories we consume to be from protein. Athletes and pregnant women need a little more, but if you're eating enough calories from a varied plant based diet, it's close to impossible to not to get enough.

The way Americans obsess about protein, you'd think protein deficiency was the number one health problem in America. Of course it's not -- it's not even on the list of the ailments that doctors are worried about in America or any other countries where basic caloric needs are being met.

What is on the list? Heart disease, cancer, diabetes, obesity -- diseases of affluence. Diseases linked to eating animal products. According to the American Dietetic Association, which looked at all of the science on vegetarian diets and found not just that they're healthy, but that they "provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases."

They continue: "Well-planned vegan and other types of vegetarian diets are appropriate for all stages of the life cycle, including during pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood and adolescence ... Vegetarians have been reported to have lower body mass indices than nonvegetarians, as well as lower rates of death from ischemic heart disease; vegetarians also show lower blood cholesterol levels; lower blood pressure; and lower rates of hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and prostate and colon cancer."

Dr. Dean Ornish writes of his Eat More, Weigh Less vegetarian diet -- the one diet that has passed peer-review for taking weight off and keeping it off for more than 5 years -- that in addition to being the one scientifically proven weight loss plan that works long-term, it "may help to prevent a wide variety of other illnesses including breast cancer in women, prostate cancer in men, colon cancer, lung cancer, lymphoma, osteoporosis, diabetes, hypertension, and so on ...."

So when people ask me about protein, I explain that protein is not a problem on a vegan diet, that the real problems that are plaguing us in the West can be addressed in part with a vegetarian diet, and that I get my protein the same way everyone else does -- I eat!

Beans, nuts, seeds, lentils, and whole grains are packed with protein. So are all vegetables as a caloric percentage, though they don't have enough calories to sustain most people as a principal source of sustenance. And these protein sources have some excellent benefits that animal protein does not -- they contain plenty of fiber and complex carbohydrates, where meat has none. That's right: Meat has no complex carbs at all, and no fiber. Plant proteins are packed with these essential nutrients.

Plus, since plant-based protein sources don't contain cholesterol or high amounts of saturated fat, they are much better for you than meat, eggs, and dairy products.

It is also worth noting the very strong link between animal protein and a few key diseases, including cancer and osteoporosis.


According to Dr. Ornish (this may be the most interesting link in this article, by the way -- it's worth reading the entire entry), "high-protein foods, particularly excessive animal protein, dramatically increase the risk of breast cancer, prostate cancer, heart disease, and many other illnesses. In the short run, they may also cause kidney problems, loss of calcium in the bones, and an unhealthy metabolic state called ketosis in many people."

The cancer connection is spelled out at length in a fantastic book by Cornell scientist T. Colin Campbell, called The China Study. Basically, there is overwhelming scientific evidence to implicate that animal protein consumption causes cancer.

And just a few quick anecdotal points:


Olympian Carl Lewis has said that his best year of track competition was the first year that he ate a vegan diet (he is still a strong proponent of vegan diets for athletes).


Strength trainer Mike Mahler says, "Becoming a vegan had a profound effect on my training. ... [M]y bench press excelled past 315 pounds, and I noticed that I recovered much faster. My body fat also went down, and I put on 10 pounds of lean muscle in a few months."


Bodybuilder Robert Cheeke advises, "The basics for nutrition are consuming large amounts of fresh green vegetables and a variety of fruits, to load yourself up with vibrant vitamins and minerals."

A few other vegans, all of whom sing the praises of the diet for their athletic performance: Ultimate fighter Mac Danzig, ultramarathoner Scott Jurek, Minnesota Twins pitcher Pat Neshek, Atlanta Hawks Guard Salim Stoudamire, and Kansas City Chiefs tight-end Tony Gonzalez.

And let's not forget about tennis star Martina Navratilova, six-time Ironman winner Dave Scott, four-time Mr. Universe Bill Pearl, or Stan Price, the world-record holder in bench press. They are just a few of the successful vegetarian athletes.

Basically, vegans and vegetarians needn't fret about protein, but many Americans do need to worry about their weight, heart disease, cancer, and other ailments -- many of which can be addressed by healthier eating, including a vegan or vegetarian diet.

Vegetarians and vegans get all the nutrients our bodies need from plants, and will thus, according to the science, be more likely to maintain a healthy weight and stave off a variety of ailments, from heart disease to cancer.

For answers to other popular questions about conscious eating, please check out my previous post on the topic here.

Happy eating!
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MessageSujet: Re: Meat    Ven 7 Sep - 2:59

Eating Vegetarian Is Taking Global Warming Personally

By Kathy Freston, Huffington Post. Posted November 30, 2007.
If you want to decrease you carbon footprint, you can start with your dinner plate.
After the tradition of Thanksgiving overindulgence, wouldn't it be nice if we had a good reason other than vanity to start eating healthfully, some other incentive to help us get on a better track in the wellness arena? Luckily, the United Nations just gave us one.

The U.N.'s latest report on global warming has bad news and good news. On the downside, a lot of scary stuff is heading for us at breakneck speed. On the upside, we still have time to do something about it -- and one thing we can all do is actually fun and delicious.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, a panel of thousands of the world's top climate scientists, has described the existence of human-caused global warming in its final assessment report as both "unequivocal," and as having "abrupt and irreversible" effects on global climate. Worse still, these effects are coming stronger and faster than expected in the panel's last report just six years ago. Alarmingly, some effects that had been predicted to arrive decades from now are already here.

The report warns that hundreds of millions of people are threatened with starvation, flooding, and weather disasters. Rain-fed crop production will fall by half, a quarter of the world's species will go extinct, and arctic ice will completely disappear during the summer. We will see more deadly heat waves, stronger hurricanes, and island nations completely obliterated from the map by rising sea levels.

And the good news is...?

Fortunately, there's still time to save ourselves -- but not very much time. The U.N. says point blank: "immediate action is vital." According to the report, we have just a few more years left to avoid the worst effects of global warming.

A problem of such scale will require governments, industries, and private citizens to work together to address what many believe to be the greatest challenge of our time. As with most solutions, the approach must be varied and come from all angles to really make the kind of quantum difference that is necessary. Here's but one -- albeit one of the most powerful -- way to add to the momentum of a turnaround: eat a plant based diet. Give up eating animals and go vegetarian. Seriously.

A U.N. report from just this past November found that a full 18 percent of global warming emissions come from raising chickens, turkeys, pigs, and other animals for food. That's about 40 percent more than all the cars, trucks, airplanes, and all other forms of transport combined (13 percent). It's also more than all the homes and offices in the world put together (8 percent).

So, one of the simplest and most elemental (and most delicious) things you can do to decrease your carbon footprint is to choose a veggie burger over a hamburger, "un-chicken" patties (try Garden Protein, the new and much talked about faux chicken/turkey) over actual chicken, or some grilled Portobello mushrooms with marinated tofu (I swear it's really good!). Order the vegetarian option whenever you go out to a restaurant -- and ask everywhere you go that they expand the vegetarian section on their menu, since it's good for owners of restaurants, hotels, airlines, etc. to know that there is consumer interest for tasty plant-based entrees.

I'm all for participating in the myriad things we can do to assist turning back the tide on human-made global warming: writing to a corporation about being environmentally responsible, turning off unnecessary lights and keeping the heat or a.c. on "low", voting for the politicians who will lead us into cleaner living, and driving a smaller more fuel efficient car. But on an ongoing more fundamental level, we can make a huge shift by simply eating differently. Being vegetarian is being green.

Eating a plant-based diet isn't just kind to animals and good for your health (and waistline!), it is also the single most effective thing you can do to reduce your carbon footprint.

We can each think creatively about how to use our roles in our families, jobs, and social circles, and join as part of the solution to this serious global threat.

With so much at stake, it's the least we can do. After all, the U.N. says there's still time if we act now. Surely that's something to be thankful for.
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MessageSujet: Re: Meat    Ven 7 Sep - 3:01

You Call Yourself a Progressive -- But You Still Eat Meat?

By Kathy Freston, AlterNet. Posted March 14, 2007.

Eating a plant-based diet is an easy, cheap way to end animal cruelty and clean up the environment. Why, then, are so many progressives still clinging to their chicken nuggets?
The report released this week by the world's leading climate scientists made no bones about it: Global warming is happening in a big way and it is very likely manmade. The U.N. report that came out soon after made a critical point: "The livestock sector emerges as one of the top two or three most significant contributors to the most serious environmental problems, at every scale from local to global." And yet, so many environmentalists continue to eat meat. Why?

Being part of the solution can be a whole lot simpler -- and cheaper -- than going out and buying a new hybrid. We can make a huge difference in the environment simply by eating a plant-based diet instead of an animal-based one. Factory farming pollutes our air and water, reduces the rainforests, and goes a long way to create global warming. Yet for some environmentalists, the idea of giving up those chicken nuggets is still hard to swallow.

So, I thought I might discuss a few of the key concerns that my meat-eating friends offer in defense of their continued meat consumption. Here we go:

Some were worried about thriving, physically, on a vegetarian diet.

Now this just does not make sense. Half of all Americans die of heart disease or cancer and two-thirds of us are overweight. The American Dietetic Association says that vegetarians have "lower rates of death from ischemic heart disease; ... lower blood cholesterol levels, lower blood pressure, and lower rates of hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and prostate and colon cancer." Vegetarians, on average, are about one-third as likely to be overweight as meat eaters.

And I've just learned from the brilliant Dr. Andrew Weil that there is something called arachidonic acid, or AA, in animal flesh that causes inflammation. AA is a pro-inflammatory fatty acid. He explains that "heart disease and Alzheimer's -- among many other diseases -- begin as inflammatory processes. The same hormonal imbalance that increases inflammation increases cell proliferation and the risk of malignant transformation." They are finding out that inflammation is key in so many of the diseases that plague us. So when you eat meat, you ingest AA, which causes inflammation, which fires up the disease process. It doesn't matter if the chicken is free range or the beef is grass-fed because the fatty acid is natural and inherent in the meat.

As for having strength and energy on a vegetarian diet, some of the world's top athletes are vegetarian. A few examples: Carl Lewis (perhaps the greatest Olympian of all time), Robert Parish (one of the "50 Greatest Players in NBA History"), Desmond Howard (Heisman Trophy winner and Super Bowl MVP), Bill Pearl (professional bodybuilder and four-time Mr. Universe), Jack La Lanne (Mr. Fitness himself) and Chris Evert (tennis champion). Vegetarian athletes have the advantage of getting all the plant protein, complex carbohydrates and fiber they need without all the artery-clogging cholesterol and saturated animal fats found in meat that would slow them down. In fact, Carl Lewis says that "my best year of track competition was the first year I ate a vegan diet."

One person pointed out that the rain forest is being cut down to grow soy, not meat.

Actually, much of the rain forest is being chopped down for grazing, but also yes, the rain forest is being chopped down to grow soy -- but not for human consumption. Americans and Europeans can't raise all the feed domestically that is needed to sustain their meat addictions, so agribusiness has started cutting down the rain forest. Ask Greenpeace or any other environmental group, and they'll tell you that the overwhelming majority of soy (or corn or wheat, for that matter) is used to feed animals in factory farms. In fact, Greenpeace recently unveiled a massive banner over an Amazon soy field that read, "KFC-Amazon Criminal," to accentuate the point that large chicken and other meat companies like KFC are responsible for the destruction of the Amazon. It takes many pounds of soy or other plant foods to produce just one pound of animal flesh -- so if you're worried about the rain forests being chopped down for grazing or to grow soy, your best move is to stop eating chickens, pigs and other animals. If more people went vegetarian, we would need far less land to feed people, and we wouldn't have to destroy the few natural places that this world has left.

Some wondered about humane, organic or kosher meat.

Sadly, most of the meat, egg and dairy companies that pretend to be eco- or animal-friendly, with packages covered in pictures of pretty red barnyards, are basically the same massive corporately owned factory farms but with a newly hired advertising consultant. In fact, labels like "Swine Welfare" and "UEP Certified" are simply the industry labels that attempt to hide the horrible abuse involved in these products' production. And even "organic" farms are industrializing in ways that shock the journalists who bother to investigate. Sadly, "kosher" means nothing when it comes to how animals are treated on farms, and the largest kosher slaughterhouse in North America was caught horribly abusing animals -- ripping the tracheas out of live cows' throats and worse -- and defending the abuse as kosher.


All that said, it's undeniable that the rare meat eater who limits himself or herself to a bit of grass-fed cattle flesh on occasion is making a much smaller environmental impact than the vast majority of Americans. But when you consider that no reputable scientific or medical body believes that eating animals is good for us, let alone necessary, one has to wonder about environmentalists who insist on consuming products that we know to be resource-intensive and polluting (even if they're less resource intensive and polluting than some other similar options or eaten in "moderation"). It'd be like driving an SUV that gets 15 mpg rather than 10, or driving an SUV three days per week instead of seven. Sure, it might be better for the environment, but with so many more fuel-efficient ways to get from A to B, there's no need to drive any SUV at all. Eating meat -- any meat -- is the same thing: With so many healthy vegetarian options that are kinder and far more eco-friendly than even the "best" meat products, there's just no good justification for someone who claims to be an environmentalist -- or to oppose cruelty -- for doing it.

Some worry about "preachy" or "judgmental" or "extreme" vegetarians.

And some consider the very choice to be a vegetarian to be extreme. Although I certainly don't like radical in-your-face messages, the truth is that, sometimes, it's the only thing that seems to wrench us out of our slumber. I know it worked with me when I saw one of the slaughterhouse videos -- definitely not pleasant, but it got my attention.

The very nature of progressive movements throughout history is to tell others to stop doing something harmful or degrading (e.g., using humans as slaves, sexually harassing women, forcing children to work in sweatshops, harming the environment, etc). Yes, the abolitionists, suffragists, feminists, and civil rights activists were called extreme, and similarly, some vegetarians are called extreme. But maybe it's just because vegetarianism is not yet a cultural norm. Old habits -- and appetites -- die hard, and there is usually a lot of resistance before things change. I'm a southern gal, and I loved my chicken fried steak like no other. I didn't want to give up the joys of Sunday barbecue or chicken wings with my friends on a Friday night. I get it; I understand.

But still, if we are to continue evolving -- physically, emotionally, and spiritually -- we really do have to look at how our dinner choices affect not only the environment but, even more importantly, the well-being (or intense suffering) of other creatures. So yes, on the one hand, the move to eating a plant-based diet may look extreme because most people don't do it. But on the other hand, we can still have our barbecued (soy dogs and veggie burgers) and feel good about it.

I do feel strongly that vegetarians should not play into the self-righteous stereotypes, that we should not be shrill or judgmental, of course, but that doesn't require silence; it simply requires patience and decorum.

A few people asked about meat in the developing world, or meat for Eskimos or Inuit.

If you are an Eskimo, or you're living in sub-Saharan Africa and you're reading this blog, I'm not going to begrudge you your pound of flesh; it would be silly of me to do so. But if you're reading this in a developed country where almost all animals are eating animal feed rather than grazing, are factory-farmed rather than living with families or hunted, and you have abundant vegetarian options all around you, talk of people who have limited food options doesn't apply to you.

Some people worried that it's hard to be a vegetarian.

Being vegetarian isn't exactly the supreme sacrifice -- surfing around the food pics on any vegetarian cooking site will show you that. Vegetarian and vegan food is everywhere (even Burger King has a veggie burger!). Most, if not all, major grocery stores carry soy milk, mock meats ("chicken" nuggets, BBQ "ribs," burgers, soy "sausage," etc.), vegan cheeses, and soy ice cream. If you can't find what you want at the store, most will order it for you. Many restaurants have veggie options a-plenty (especially Thai, Indian, Ethiopian, Mexican and other ethnic restaurants, which are my favorite anyway). Sure, some vegetarians may prefer not to eat food that was cooked on the same grill as meat, but I'm not concerned about that (it does not cause more animals to suffer or more environmental harm). You can find great vegetarian recipes at www.VegCooking.com.

I'd also like to address the top five most common justifications that I hear from meat eaters for their meat consumption:

No. 5: "Humans have always eaten animals -- it's natural."

First, our evolution in human morality is marked almost entirely by our attempt to move beyond the "might makes right" law of the jungle. It may indeed be "natural" for the powerful to dominate the weak, but that doesn't mean we should support it.

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MessageSujet: Re: Meat    Ven 7 Sep - 3:02

(suite)

Second, human bodies don't require meat to be healthy -- quite the opposite. Animal flesh contains cholesterol and saturated fat, which are hard on our bodies. We may have had a need to eat meat thousands of years ago, in times of scarcity as hunter-gatherers, but we don't need to now, and we'll be better off if we don't. Check out this essay by Dr. Milton Mills for more information on the issue of whether the human physiology is designed for meat consumption.

Most critically, the people who say this generally use it to justify buying the same old meat that comes from giant, wholly unnatural factory farms where animals are crammed into filthy sheds or cages and not allowed to do anything natural to them -- at all, ever (breathe fresh air, bask in the sun, raise their young, dust-bathe, form social orders, etc.). Chickens in the egg industry have half their beaks cut off, piglets in the pork industry have their tails cut off, etc. (Please take 10 minutes to watch the video at a href="http://www.meat.org">www.Meat.org.) This is how 99 percent of chickens and turkeys, 95 percent of pigs and eggs, and most cow flesh and dairy products end up on our plates.

Lastly, if you care so much about being "natural," then think for a moment about the harm that you're doing to your natural environment by eating meat -- any meat. At the end of the day, for me, we don't need to eat meat, we'll be better off without it, and it causes animals to suffer.

No. 4: "Animals are not equal to humans, so we should not be so concerned about them."

I disagree with Princeton professor Peter Singer on many issues, but on this one I think he gets it precisely right. Writes Dr. Singer, "[W]hen nonvegetarians say that 'human problems come first,' I cannot help wondering what exactly it is that they are doing for human beings that compels them to continue to support the wasteful, ruthless exploitation of farm animals." Which is to say: Fine, don't spend any time at all on animal issues, but please don't pay other people to abuse animals, which is what you are doing when you buy chicken, pork or other animal products. And remember: A vegetarian diet is also the best diet for the planet, so eat as though the planet depended on it, since it just might.

No. 3: "There have been many brilliant meat eaters, like Picasso and Mozart, so they could not have been wrong."

I highly doubt that anyone is going to suggest that vegetarians Steve Jobs, Leonardo da Vinci, Pythagoras, Albert Einstein, Leo Tolstoy or Mohandas Gandhi were especially brilliant because they were vegetarians, and I also don't think one can make the argument that meat eaters attained their great heights as a result of their diet. Interestingly, studies show that vegetarians are smarter than meat eaters, but there is probably not causality there -- it's probably just that thoughtful people tend to question things more deeply, hence the decision to become vegetarian. Here's a 2006 study from the British Medical Journal about vegetarians being smarter than meat eaters.

No. 2: "Where do you draw the line? Should we protect insects? What's the difference between killing plants and killing animals? They're all alive."

The theologian and Narnia inventor C.S. Lewis staunchly opposed testing on animals on Christian grounds, and he pointed out to those who asked this question that the question is baseless -- they already know and understand the differences between plants and animals. To whit, every reader will recoil in horror if asked to imagine lighting a cat on fire or beating a dog's head in with a baseball bat -- because we know that these things cause the animals pain. But none of us feels similarly at the prospect of pulling weeds or mowing our lawn -- because we know that weeds and lawns have no capacity to feel pain. Chickens, pigs, fish and cattle all feel pain in the same way and to the same degree as any dog or cat. Just watch their faces and their body language in these undercover videos; listen to their animal versions of screaming. I assure you, grass does not suffer like these poor creatures do.

I'm not so sure about insects, though I try to give them the benefit of the doubt whenever possible. Yes, when I walk down the street, I'm sure I step on bugs. But does the fact that I can't stop all cruelty mean that I shouldn't bother to stop a lot of it? Of course not. That'd be like saying that if you drive a car, you shouldn't even bother to recycle.

And the No. 1 justification for eating meat is: "Meat won't kill me, and I like it."

No question -- this is the crux of it all, the only purely honest answer if you ask me. Sure enough, unless you get really bad food poisoning from your next piece of undercooked chicken or choke to death on a piece of steak, meat won't kill you right away. But chances are pretty good that eating meat could reduce your life span (and quality) in the long run. The American Dietetic Association (the overarching group of nutrition researchers, doctors, etc.) says that vegetarians have lower rates of heart disease, cancer, diabetes and obesity than do meat eaters. Some argue that for every study, there's another that says the opposite, but that's simply not so in this case. You'd be hard-pressed to find a reputable scientific or medical body that disagrees with the simple fact that vegetarians are a fraction as likely to be overweight and much less likely to suffer from heart disease and cancer. Really, even if I didn't give a hoot about animal suffering or environmental degradation, I would still be vegetarian because the diet is the best diet for my health. And as noted, eating meat does support cruelty to animals and environmental degradation, all for the sake of a palate preference (which, by the way, can be largely satisfied by the luscious faux meat options out there).

Concluding thoughts:

One thing about being a vegetarian that is often missed is how empowering it is. Personally, I think that integrity of action requires that among other things, we attempt to lead lives that are as compassionate and conscious as possible. What this means to me, personally, is that if there is something that I would not want to do myself, I don't feel good paying someone else to do it on my behalf. So I don't inflict suffering or kill animals myself; and I don't support the market of killing by buying these poor animals chopped up and shrink-wrapped in the grocery store either.

We are a nation of animal lovers, and we all cringe in horror when we hear about cases like a dog being burned alive or tossed into freeway traffic. But chickens and pigs and other animals also deserve our compassion. They are all smart animals who feel pain and fear, yet they are treated just horribly, and sadly, there are no laws to protect them. Don't take my word for it, watch Alec Baldwin's Meet Your Meat and see for yourself what goes on.

We oppose sweatshops and child labor, and we cringe at the thought of children laboring in developing countries. But American slaughterhouses are sweatshops. They employ people working illegally who can't defend themselves out of fear of being deported. Conditions in these places are so bad that the average annual turnover rate for slaughter-line workers is out of sight. Check out the website of this labor organization to learn about its fight against Smithfield Foods (the world's largest pork and turkey producer, which owns Butterball).

We are environmentalists, and we cringe when see a bright yellow Hummer in the grocery store parking lot. But regardless of the amount of fuel that a Hummer uses or the amount of greenhouse gasses that it emits, if we're eating meat, we're making a conscious decision that is even more wasteful and polluting. In addition to my recent Vegetarian is the New Prius piece, check out this E Magazine article by the magazine's editor, The Case Against Meat, or this Grist.com article, How Poultry Producers Are Ravaging the Rural South, as just a few examples.

Americans and Europeans eat meat because we want to, not because we have to. And we do it at the expense of animals, people and the environment.

We would do well to consider a dietary change. For some tips on making that change, please see my previous AlterNet Blog :

http://www.alternet.org/environment/48633
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MessageSujet: Re: Meat    Ven 7 Sep - 3:02

One Bite at a Time: A Beginner's Guide to Vegetarianism

By Kathy Freston, Huffington Post. Posted March 2, 2007.

How to become vegetarian -- and help save the environment -- in six easy steps.
I've argued in two recent essays, "A Few More 'Inconvenient Truths'" and "Vegetarian Is the New Prius," that a plant-based diet is a good choice for the planet, our health and animals. Of course, there are other things we should be doing -- from cutting down on our consumption to working for governmental change to buying organic and on and on -- but where diet is concerned, a vegetarian diet is the hands-down best choice for those of us who care about animals and the environment.

I heard from a lot of people who wanted help in making the transition to a vegetarian (or mostly vegetarian) diet. Let's face it: If you've been eating meat all your life, this sort of a change can be daunting even just to think about, let alone act on. Happily, it's easier than ever today to make the transition from meat-eater to vegetarian, and the following suggestions should help even the most die-hard carnivores make the switch.

First: Transition

If you're not ready to give up meat completely, start by eating meatless meals one or two days a week. The Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Columbia University's School of Public Health, and other public health schools have designed a "Meatless Monday" campaign to help Americans avoid our four top killers -- heart disease, stroke, diabetes and cancer -- by eating meat-free at least every Monday. The "Meatless Monday" program provides recipes, meal plans, nutritional guidelines, cooking tips and more.

My only problem with the campaign is that some of the recipes feature fish, and fish are definitely not vegetables. If you're eating fish, you're eating meat, and the recent studies on fish are even scarier than the studies on beef or any other food. The three-part front page series in the Chicago Tribune about brain damage and other health problems caused by mercury, PCBs, and the other toxins found in fish and the front page piece in the Wall Street Journal about the teen whose fish consumption put him in remedial classes should be enough to turn anyone off fish consumption. For omega-3 fatty acids, go with flax seeds, walnuts and leafy greens.

Second: Give up the little animals first

Although many people tend to stop eating red meat before they give up chicken, turkey or fish, from a humane standpoint, this is backwards. Birds are arguably the most abused animals on the planet, and birds and fish yield less flesh than cows or pigs, so farmers and fishers kill more of them to satisfy America's meat habit. If you choose to give up meat in stages, stop eating chickens and turkeys first, then fish, and then pigs and cows. Some will suggest that cattle are the worst for the environment, but that seems like hair-splitting to me. The Amazon rain forest is being cut down to grow soybeans to feed chickens; it's chicken and pig farms that are poisoning the Atlantic Ocean, and vastly more energy is required if we eat the chickens who are fed grain rather than eating that grain directly.

Third: If you can't give up one particular animal product, give up all the other ones

One friend told me that he just loves burgers too much to give them up; I suggested that he give up all animal products except burgers. Some of my friends can't give up ice cream or cream in their coffee or whatever -- so give up everything but that. That's a huge step forward, and I suspect that after eating mostly vegetarian for awhile, you'll decide that those burgers or that ice cream aren't so tasty anymore. And you'll probably find that you enjoy the faux meats and dairy-free options just as much.

Fourth: Examine your diet, and substitute

Take a look at the meals that you and your family already enjoy, and you'll probably notice that many of them can be made without any meat or with mock meats (which are great transition foods) instead of animal flesh. For example, instead of spaghetti and meat sauce, make spaghetti and marinara sauce, or instead of beef burritos, try tasty bean burritos. Replace ground beef with the vegetarian variety made by Boca or Morningstar Farms, which can be found in just about any grocery store. Or try Morningstar Farms' faux chicken strips and steak strips and Boca's Chik'n Patties. If you need help putting together a shopping list, check out the product reviews at VegCooking.com before you head out to the store.


Mock meats, nondairy cheeses and milks, and other vegetarian foods are sold in most major supermarkets these days, and health food stores offer even more. Silk soy milk is probably one of the most recognizable vegan products on the market -- you can even order it in your latte at Starbucks. And if you like to bake, look for egg replacer, a powdered mix that can be used instead of eggs in cakes and other baked goods, at the local health food store (or just use applesauce). But don't forget to eat your vegetables -- as well as plenty of whole grains, fresh fruits, and legumes -- before filling up on cake and coffee!

After a few meatless meals, you'll likely realize that you don't miss meat and are ready to go meatless for good. But don't beat yourself up if you slip up every now and again -- before long, eating vegetarian will come as naturally as breathing.

I know that some readers who are already vegetarian may take issue with the idea of relying on faux meats (I can predict all the raw food comments, the macrobiotic comments, and so on), but mock meats and soy milk are superb transition foods. Certainly going with real foods, as Michael Pollan calls them -- things that your grandmother would recognize -- is a great idea, but don't worry if you find that mock meats make the switch easier for you. Animals are going to be happier either way.

Fifth: Eating out

If you're eating out, there are countless restaurants that cater to vegetarians and vegans. VegCooking.com features regional vegetarian restaurants, restaurant chains that offer vegetarian options, and links to other websites that list vegetarian-friendly eateries. Ethnic restaurants, especially Thai, Indian, Ethiopian, Chinese and Mexican restaurants, are always a good choice, as they offer a variety of vegetarian and vegan options. If you're still looking for a burger and fries, many restaurants, including Johnny Rockets, Denny's and Ruby Tuesday's, serve veggie burgers. Just don't drive yourself -- and your dining companions -- crazy worrying that your veggie burger was prepared on the same surface as the hamburgers. It might be a bit aesthetically troublesome, but it won't harm animals (or the planet) if your food is cooked on the same grill as meat. Unless you absolutely can't stomach it, let it pass.

Sixth: Don't sweat the small stuff

Vegans and vegan wannabes, I believe that when you're eating out, you also shouldn't be too concerned about ingredients that make up less than 2 percent of your meal. You'll obviously want to avoid dishes served with meat, cheese or eggs, but it doesn't really matter if there's a modicum of butter or whey or other animal product in the bun that your veggie burger is served on. You won't stop animal suffering by avoiding such minuscule amounts of animal ingredients. But you may give your nonvegan friends -- not to mention the restaurant wait staff -- the idea that vegans are difficult to please. The goal is to show others how easy it is to eat in an animal-friendly manner and that restaurants can satisfy vegan customers without having to do cartwheels.

I know, again, that some will post their protest, and I understand the desire to eliminate every last bit of animal ingredients from one's diet, but let's face it: Even vegan foods cause some animals to be tilled up in processing. (Note: Since more than 70 percent of all grain, soybeans and other crops are fed to farmed animals, not to humans, there is a lot more tiller death in chicken, turkey, pork and beef than in plant foods, but the point should still give vegetarians a bit of humility.) Vegetarianism is not a personal purity test -- our positive and reasonable influence on others is just as important as our own commitment to a conscious and compassionate diet.

Conclusion

When you consider your choices -- heart disease, colon cancer, plus-size pants, melting ice caps, gale force storms and animal suffering versus good health, energy, a trim physique, a livable planet, compassion, and tasty, diverse foods -- it's clear that going vegetarian is an excellent choice as we move toward living a more conscious life.
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MessageSujet: Re: Meat    Ven 7 Sep - 3:04

Vegetarian Is the New Prius

By Kathy Freston, Huffington Post. Posted February 7, 2007.

Livestock destroy the environment, so fill your bowl with veggies instead of veal.

President Herbert Hoover promised "a chicken in every pot and a car in every garage." With warnings about global warming reaching feverish levels, many are having second thoughts about all those cars. It seems they should instead be worrying about the chickens.

Last month, the United Nations published a report on livestock and the environment with a stunning conclusion: "The livestock sector emerges as one of the top two or three most significant contributors to the most serious environmental problems, at every scale from local to global." It turns out that raising animals for food is a primary cause of land degradation, air pollution, water shortage, water pollution, loss of biodiversity, and not least of all, global warming.

That's right, global warming. You've probably heard the story: Emissions of greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide are changing our climate, and scientists warn of more extreme weather, coastal flooding, spreading disease, and mass extinctions. It seems that when you step outside and wonder what happened to winter, you might want to think about what you had for dinner last night. The U.N. report says almost a fifth of global warming emissions come from livestock (i.e., those chickens Hoover was talking about, plus pigs, cattle, and others) -- that's more emissions than from all of the world's transportation combined.

For a decade now, the image of Leonardo DiCaprio cruising in his hybrid Toyota Prius has defined the gold standard for environmentalism. These gas-sipping vehicles became a veritable symbol of the consumers' power to strike a blow against global warming. Just think: a car that could cut your vehicle emissions in half -- in a country responsible for 25% of the world's total greenhouse gas emissions. Federal fuel economy standards languished in Congress, and average vehicle mileage dropped to its lowest level in decades, but the Prius showed people that another way is possible. Toyota could not import the cars fast enough to meet demand.

Last year researchers at the University of Chicago took the Prius down a peg when they turned their attention to another gas guzzling consumer purchase. They noted that feeding animals for meat, dairy, and egg production requires growing some ten times as much crops as we'd need if we just ate pasta primavera, faux chicken nuggets, and other plant foods. On top of that, we have to transport the animals to slaughterhouses, slaughter them, refrigerate their carcasses, and distribute their flesh all across the country. Producing a calorie of meat protein means burning more than ten times as much fossil fuels -- and spewing more than ten times as much heat-trapping carbon dioxide -- as does a calorie of plant protein. The researchers found that, when it's all added up, the average American does more to reduce global warming emissions by going vegetarian than by switching to a Prius.

According to the UN report, it gets even worse when we include the vast quantities of land needed to give us our steak and pork chops. Animal agriculture takes up an incredible 70% of all agricultural land, and 30% of the total land surface of the planet. As a result, farmed animals are probably the biggest cause of slashing and burning the world's forests. Today, 70% of former Amazon rainforest is used for pastureland, and feed crops cover much of the remainder. These forests serve as "sinks," absorbing carbon dioxide from the air, and burning these forests releases all the stored carbon dioxide, quantities that exceed by far the fossil fuel emission of animal agriculture.

As if that wasn't bad enough, the real kicker comes when looking at gases besides carbon dioxide -- gases like methane and nitrous oxide, enormously effective greenhouse gases with 23 and 296 times the warming power of carbon dioxide, respectively. If carbon dioxide is responsible for about one-half of human-related greenhouse gas warming since the industrial revolution, methane and nitrous oxide are responsible for another one-third. These super-strong gases come primarily from farmed animals' digestive processes, and from their manure. In fact, while animal agriculture accounts for 9% of our carbon dioxide emissions, it emits 37% of our methane, and a whopping 65% of our nitrous oxide.

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MessageSujet: Re: Meat    Ven 7 Sep - 3:04

It's a little hard to take in when thinking of a small chick hatching from her fragile egg. How can an animal, so seemingly insignificant against the vastness of the earth, give off so much greenhouse gas as to change the global climate? The answer is in their sheer numbers. The United States alone slaughters more than 10 billion land animals every year, all to sustain a meat-ravenous culture that can barely conceive of a time not long ago when "a chicken in every pot" was considered a luxury. Land animals raised for food make up a staggering 20% of the entire land animal biomass of the earth. We are eating our planet to death. What we're seeing is just the beginning, too. Meat consumption has increased five-fold in the past fifty years, and is expected to double again in the next fifty.

It sounds like a lot of bad news, but in fact it's quite the opposite. It means we have a powerful new weapon to use in addressing the most serious environmental crisis ever to face humanity. The Prius was an important step forward, but how often are people in the market for a new car? Now that we know a greener diet is even more effective than a greener car, we can make a difference at every single meal, simply by leaving the animals off of our plates. Who would have thought: what's good for our health is also good for the health of the planet!

Going veg provides more bang for your buck than driving a Prius. Plus, that bang comes a lot faster. The Prius cuts emissions of carbon dioxide, which spreads its warming effect slowly over a century. A big chunk of the problem with farmed animals, on the other hand, is methane, a gas which cycles out of the atmosphere in just a decade. That means less meat consumption quickly translates into a cooler planet.

Not just a cooler planet, also a cleaner one. Animal agriculture accounts for most of the water consumed in this country, emits two-thirds of the world's acid-rain-causing ammonia, and it the world's largest source of water pollution -- killing entire river and marine ecosystems, destroying coral reefs, and of course, making people sick. Try to imagine the prodigious volumes of manure churned out by modern American farms: 5 million tons a day, more than a hundred times that of the human population, and far more than our land can possibly absorb. The acres and acres of cesspools stretching over much of our countryside, polluting the air and contaminating our water, make the Exxon Valdez oil spill look minor in comparison. All of which we can fix surprisingly easily, just by putting down our chicken wings and reaching for a veggie burger.

Doing so has never been easier. Recent years have seen an explosion of environmentally-friendly vegetarian foods. Even chains like Ruby Tuesday, Johnny Rockets, and Burger King offer delicious veggie burgers and supermarket refrigerators are lined with heart-healthy creamy soymilk and tasty veggie deli slices. Vegetarian foods have become staples at environmental gatherings, and garnered celebrity advocates like Bill Maher, Alec Baldwin, Paul McCartney, and of course Leonardo DiCaprio. Just as the Prius showed us that we each have in our hands the power to make a difference against a problem that endangers the future of humanity, going vegetarian gives us a new way to dramatically reduce our dangerous emissions that is even more effective, easier to do, more accessible to everyone and certainly goes better with french fries.

Ever-rising temperatures, melting ice caps, spreading tropical diseases, stronger hurricanes ... So, what are you do doing for dinner tonight? Check out www.VegCooking.com for great ideas, free recipes, meal plans, and more! Check out the environmental section of www.GoVeg.com for a lot more information about the harmful effect of meat-eating on the environment.

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MessageSujet: Re: Meat    Ven 7 Sep - 6:23

April 24 , 2008

Support PETA's "End Factory Farming" Challenge today, and your gift will be doubled. You will provide twice the resources to help end the suffering of more than 40 million individual cows abused on factory farms and in slaughterhouses.

Most cows never enjoy a peaceful day in a grassy field.

Instead, cows raised for their milk often are confined to filthy sheds and barren dirt lots. They're hooked up to milking machines several times each day and are given hormones and antibiotics. They are repeatedly impregnated until their weak bodies finally give out. Then they are hauled on filthy trucks, sometimes hundreds of miles, to slaughterhouses. When they arrive, they are hung upside-down, dismembered, and skinned—sometimes while they are still conscious.

Cows on factory farms urgently need your help. Your tax-deductible donation today will be matched—dollar-for-dollar—by a group of generous PETA donors. That means twice the support for our efforts to open the eyes and hearts of consumers to the suffering of these sensitive animals.

By making an online donation during this special challenge period, you will help sustain PETA's vital investigations into milk and beef factory farms and slaughterhouses around the world. Thanks to our videos, photos, and firsthand testimonies of abuse, people are waking up to the horrific lives of suffering endured by cows and other animals killed for food.

https://ebiz.isiservices.com/peta-e/peta/donation.asp?section_code=C08N003U&ask4=--25-35-50-100-o

People are learning that cows' horns are cut out of their skulls or burned off and that male calves' testicles are torn from their scrotums without any pain relief whatsoever. Cows are shipped to massive, barren feed lots, and not all of them survive the journey. They are fed an unnatural diet that can cause painful stomach ailments and sometimes fatal liver abscesses. Finally, at the end of their lives, the cows go on a frightening truck ride to their deaths.

The only U.S. law that exists for the protection of farmed animals—the decades-old Humane Slaughter Act—is rarely enforced. While the law requires that cows be rendered unconscious before they are strung upside-down, the high-speed assembly line often fails to stun them, which means that many cows are skinned and dismembered while they are still conscious.

Already, PETA has won major animal welfare improvements at the world's largest suppliers of pig and chicken flesh, but we're still working to end violence against cows and other animals. In order to win these battles, we need you to show your commitment to animals. Please make a contribution during the "End Factory Farming" Challenge right now.Your gift will be doubled and will help us give cows the peace and cruelty-free lives that they deserve.

https://ebiz.isiservices.com/peta-e/peta/donation.asp?section_code=C08N003U&ask4=--25-35-50-100-o

You can help us end the terrible conditions that cows and other animals trapped on factory farms suffer in every day. Please make a tax-deductible contribution during this special challenge, and your gift will be matched dollar-for-dollar. Your generosity will go twice as far to help these sensitive animals.

https://ebiz.isiservices.com/peta-e/peta/donation.asp?section_code=C08N003U&ask4=--25-35-50-100-o
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MessageSujet: Re: Meat    Ven 7 Sep - 6:24

News du 1er mai 2008 :

Kokun and Potpo are two extraordinarily lucky chickens. They were rescued by an undercover PETA investigator from a miserable life. Had he not whisked them away to safety, they were destined to die on a Tyson Foods factory farm. You can help stop the abuse of chickens on factory farms by making a gift to PETA's Factory Farming Challenge. Give today, and your gift will be matched dollar-for-dollar.

https://ebiz.isiservices.com/peta-e/peta/donation.asp?section_code=C08N004U&ask4=--25-35-50-100-o

Most chickens will never be as fortunate as these two are. Each year in the U.S., more than 9 billion individual chickens suffer on factory farms and are killed for their wings and thighs. Because these birds are not protected by a single federal law, workers maim, torture, and slaughter them in the most barbaric ways.

PETA's undercover investigators have documented sickening cruelty to chickens in Tyson slaughterhouses in Union City, Tenn., and Cumming, Ga. We have videotaped workers while they beat live chickens against walls and rails until the birds' backs broke. The workers ripped animals' heads off their bodies, stabbed live chickens in their necks, and urinated on the conveyor belt that moves the birds to the blade that cuts their throats.

Tyson Foods is the largest meat processor on the planet. It is one of the corporate world's worst abusers of animals. Now, armed with evidence of the cruelty we've uncovered, PETA is pushing Tyson to the negotiating table. No chicken should suffer this abusive treatment. With your support during this special End Factory Farming Challenge, your gift will be matched by a group of generous PETA donors dollar-for-dollar. It will go twice as far toward winning strong new protections for chickens and other animals on factory farms.

https://ebiz.isiservices.com/peta-e/peta/donation.asp?section_code=C08N004U&ask4=--25-35-50-100-o

PETA's efforts have accomplished much:

Tyson has fired workers we caught on tape abusing animals and has disciplined others.
State and federal authorities are investigating Tyson slaughterhouses, and we hope they will pursue cruelty-to-animals charges. This is a good start. But we need to get Tyson to phase out the cruel "killing machine" that usually cuts chickens' throats-except when birds thrash in terror and miss the blade. Chickens who miss the blade are often still conscious when they reach the defeathering tank-where they are scalded to death.

We want Tyson to use controlled-atmosphere killing (CAK)-which is the least cruel form of poultry slaughter ever developed-in all its slaughterhouses immediately. CAK entails painlessly killing chickens with a nonpoisonous and undetectable gas mixture while they are still in their transport cages. This method drastically reduces the amount of physical abuse that workers can inflict on birds. Just by switching to CAK, Tyson Foods can eliminate almost all the abuse that PETA investigators have documented at chicken slaughterhouses.

But Tyson will not do the right thing unless caring people like you act now. Please make as generous a donation as you can during this special challenge so that we can keep the heat on Tyson for as long as it takes to protect these poor animals who need our help. Thank you for your continued commitment and compassion for chickens and other animals in this cruel industry.

https://ebiz.isiservices.com/peta-e/peta/donation.asp?section_code=C08N004U&ask4=--25-35-50-100-o

Birds account for more than 97 percent of all animals bred, confined, and killed on factory farms and in slaughterhouses. Billions of chickens like Kokun and Potpo never feel the sun, breathe fresh air, or do many of the other activities that are natural and important to them. By donating during the End Factory Farming Challenge today, your gift will be matched dollar-for-dollar and your generosity will go twice as far toward helping end the needless abuse of these wonderful animals.
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MessageSujet: Re: Meat    Ven 7 Sep - 6:26

Level 2: Got an Hour or Two?


Write a Letter to the Editor

Write letters about issues affecting animals on factory farms to newspaper and magazine editors. If you see an article about health and nutrition, write a letter about the health benefits of vegetarianism. Respond to articles about federal budget cuts with letters about the tax dollars that are wasted on meat and dairy subsidies. Or, write a letter that outlines the ways in which KFC tortures chickens and encourage conscientious consumers to boycott that business.
Whatever your topic, make sure that you follow the publication’s guidelines and include your name, your address, and your telephone number, or your letter may not be printed. If your letter is published, it could be read by thousands of people! Send a copy of your printed letter to us at VegInfo@peta.org, and we’ll send you the book or T-shirt of your choice from our catalog.

Read PETA’s Guide to Letter-Writing.
Turn Your Library Into ‘Vegetarian Central’!

With PETA’s exciting new vegetarian posters, you can create a beautiful, compelling display in your local library. Reach hundreds of people with a message of compassion.
Spend an Hour Handing Out Leaflets

Personal interaction can have a big impact! Grab a stack of PETA’s leaflets and choose an area with lots of foot traffic. (Be sure to stay on public property—you have a First Amendment right to distribute information there.) Approach passers-by with a smile and a leaflet. Ask them, “Would you like free information about vegetarianism?” Be friendly, and be prepared to answer some commonly asked questions by reading our suggested responses. Don’t waste time on those who just want to argue with you, but continue to be polite because rudeness will only alienate people who overhear it. Briefly clarify your position, express regret at the disagreement, and then turn to the next person.
We’ve had great success with our “vegetarian celebrity” leaflet! Order some today!

Are you low on cash but need more leaflets? Use our online form to send us your name, your mailing address, and a list of the materials you need and how you’ll use them, and we’ll send you the materials for free.
Set Up an Information Table

Setting up an information table in a busy area of your town is a great way to reach a lot of people. Ask permission to set up tables at places like the local shopping mall, concerts, street and craft fairs, and area schools. Stock your table with leaflets and factsheets (available from PETA), and get ready to educate! If there’s no space to set up a table, then simply distribute your favorite literature to people who walk by. Our favorite is the “vegetarian celebrity” leaflet.
View our wide selection of pro-vegetarianism leaflets. Read tips for successful tabling.
Are you low on cash but need more leaflets? Use our online form to send us your name, your mailing address, and a list of the materials you need and how you'll use them, and we'll send you the materials for free.
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MessageSujet: Re: Meat    Ven 7 Sep - 6:27

February 15 , 2008

Show Videos in Public Places


Handing out leaflets on a street corner and setting up a table full of literature are terrific ways to educate people about factory farming and vegetarian eating. If you really want to turn heads, try showing a powerful video—it can have an enormous impact. We have listed several ways to show videos in public. Great locations to show videos include the areas outside subway stations and malls, near the lines outside concerts and sports events, and in front of grocery stores; indoor festivals; street corners; dog walks and fairs; and any other spots where there's a lot of pedestrian traffic.
The First Amendment gives you the right to speak out about any issue, distribute literature, and show videos in public. In almost all cities, you can set up a TV or literature table on a public sidewalk without a permit, as long as you are not completely blocking pedestrians from walking on the sidewalk. However, it's a good idea to call your city hall beforehand to make sure that a permit is not needed. It's also a good idea to write down the name and title of the person you speak with at city hall; keep that information with you when you're tabling or showing videos in case any questions come up. When you're planning to table or show videos at indoor festivals or events on private property, request permission from the event organizers before setting up a TV or table.
For a free copy of "Meet Your Meat" on CD-ROM, please e-mail Chalissa1@aol.com. For a DVD or VHS copy, e-mail VegInfo@peta.org. (You can set your CD-ROM or DVD player on "repeat." If you will be using a VCR, we can send you a 90-minute "loop" VHS copy.) Or just download "Meet Your Meat" directly on your computer. If you're protesting against KFC, we can send you a copy of Pam Anderson's exposé that you can show outside the restaurant!
Laptop or Mini DVD Player


Put your laptop or portable mini DVD player on your literature table. Set the DVD or CD-ROM on "repeat" so that it will play over and over again (or you can just keep pushing "play"). If you don't have a table and your laptop/DVD player is small enough, you can just have an activist hold it outward for people to watch.
TV With a VCR or DVD Player


You can set up a TV and a VCR or DVD player on your literature table. If you are inside and there's an electrical outlet nearby, you're all set. Otherwise, by using a car or boat battery and a converter/generator (available at any hardware store), you can create an effective video unit that can be set up anywhere you want.
Build Your Own 'Faunette'


If you need something that's a bit more stable, protected, and durable, try building your own "Faunette." A Faunette is a TV/VCR unit that is powered by a deep-cycle battery and is enclosed in a mobile case. It takes a bit of time and skill to create one, but its anti-glare screen makes it very useful for outdoor tabling events. Read Compassion Over Killing's guide for more information and step-by-step directions.
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MessageSujet: Re: Meat    Ven 7 Sep - 6:28

Spread the Message to People of Faith

One of the easiest ways to promote vegetarianism is to “adopt” a house of worship and then make sure that the building’s literature area is stocked with faith-based pro-vegetarianism literature. We have excellent pamphlets that focus on the reasons why Christians and Jews should adopt a vegetarian diet, including “Judaism and Vegetarianism,” “Christianity and Vegetarianism” for Catholics, and “Honoring God’s Creation” for both Catholics and Protestants. These pamphlets were written by members of these faiths and can be a powerful influence. It just takes a few moments of your time to drop them off. Order literature today!
Other ways to spread the message of compassion to people of faith:
Set Up an Information Table

If you attend a place of worship, consider setting up an information table there after services—it will give you an opportunity to distribute literature and to speak with members of your congregation about animal rights and vegetarianism.

Host a Vegan Potluck Meal

What better way to promote veganism than by showing your fellow congregation members just how tasty cruelty-free dining can be? Everyone will be buzzing about your faux fried chicken, Shepherd’s Pie, and chocolate mousse! The best part? All these recipes and more can be found in our free vegetarian starter kit, so when people beg for your cooking secrets, you can give them the full low-down on vegetarianism. Need more recipes? Visit VegCooking.com.

Distribute Leaflets

Houses of worship are excellent places to stand and distribute hundreds of leaflets in about 10 minutes. Remember to dress appropriately and start your distribution either before the service begins or after it has ended.

Plan a Demonstration

Read PETA’s guide to holding an effective demonstration.
Organize a protest against KFC’s abuse of chickens.
Organize a ‘Feed-In’!

Passing out tasty vegan food is a fantastic way to show that being vegan is delicious as well as compassionate because, as we all know, the fastest way to people's hearts is through their stomachs! Get your hands on some veggie burgers and literature, grab a few friends, make some “Free Food!” signs, and head out to a high-traffic piece of sidewalk. Check out Compassion Over Killing's “Guide to Organizing Feed-Ins” and contact PETA for literature.
Host a Vegan Dinner Party

What better way to promote veganism than by showing your friends just how tasty cruelty-free dining can be? Invite them over for a meal, and they’ll be buzzing about your faux fried chicken, Shepherd's Pie, and chocolate mousse! The best part? All these recipes and more can be found in our free vegetarian starter kit, so when people are begging for your cooking secrets, you can give them the full low-down on vegetarianism. Need more recipes? Visit VegCooking.com.
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MessageSujet: Re: Meat    Ven 7 Sep - 6:28

February 14 , 2008

Get Active on Campus (Even If You’re Not a Student!)

Students tend to be considerably more open to vegetarianism than is the general population, so it’s essential to spread the message of compassion to as many students as possible. Vegan Outreach’s “Adopt a College” program provides tips on distributing vegetarian literature to students at schools across the U.S. and Canada. Passing out literature doesn’t take much time or planning, and it’s a great way to convince people to choose vegetarianism!
If you’d like to “adopt” a campus where you will distribute literature, please send us an [email]e-mail[/email] message with your name, your postal address, and the name of the school at which you plan to hand out leaflets.
If you’re a college student, be sure to check out peta2 College for great ideas about helping animals and for tons of opportunities to win cool prizes.
Stop Kentucky Fried Cruelty!

Restaurant chain KFC scalds chickens while they are still alive and burns off the highly sensitive beaks of baby birds. PETA has pressured the company to adopt important animal welfare reforms, but KFC has done nothing to stop its worst abuses. Visit KentuckyFriedCruelty.com to read more about the campaign and to learn how you can help.
Turn a Building Into a Movie Screen

This project will make a major impression on anyone who is walking by. Purchase a copy of “Meet Your Meat,” and borrow or rent a video projector. Find a building that has a large, flat outer wall and that is located in an area that has a lot of pedestrians. In the evening, set up the projector and show everyone the truth about what happens to the animals who suffer on factory farms and in slaughterhouses. Be sure that you are on public property and that projecting videos on walls is legal in your area. College campuses are perfect locations—project the video against the side of either the library or the cafeteria. Be sure to have vegetarian starter kits on hand for distribution.
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MessageSujet: Re: Meat    Ven 7 Sep - 6:30

August 29 , 2009

Cruelty Capital, USA


KFC suppliers cram birds into huge waste-filled factories, breed and drug them to grow so large that they can’t even walk, and often break their wings and legs. At slaughter, the birds’ throats are slit and they are dropped into tanks of scalding-hot water—often while they are still conscious. It would be illegal for KFC to abuse dogs, cats, pigs, or cows in these ways. KFC’s own animal welfare advisors have asked the company to take steps to eliminate these abuses, but KFC refuses to do so. Many advisors have now resigned in frustration. Please join Pamela Anderson, Sir Paul McCartney, His Holiness the Dalai Lama, The Rev. Al Sharpton, and countless other kind people worldwide by not eating at KFC.
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MessageSujet: Re: Meat    Ven 7 Sep - 6:31

July 20th , 2007

Eating meat contributes to global warming, says study

[fr][de]


Eating one kilogram of beef produces more greenhouse gas emissions than driving for three hours while leaving the lights on at home, according to a new study from Japan that examines the CO2 emissions resulting from bringing an average beef cow to market.

Related:

LinksDossier: EU climate change policies


Brief News:



Researchers from the National Institute of Livestock and Grassland Science in Tsukuba, Japan, examined the "life-cycle" of a standard beef cow, including feed production and transport, animal management and the biological activity of the animal.
These life-cycle stages were then scrutinised for their climate change-related impacts: energy consumption, methane production, and water acidification and eutrophication - meaning the excessive nutrient enrichment of water bodies that can reduce both their oxygen content and CO2 absorption capacity.
In total, over 4,500 kilograms of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are produced by one average beef cow throughout its life-cycle, according to the study, published in the August 2007 edition of the Animal Science Journal .
Methane produced by the digestive systems of the animals accounts for most of the GHG emissions, while more than two-thirds of the total energy needs are taken up in the production and transport of feed for the animals.
The study examined standard industrial meat production methods in Japan and did not examine the additional CO2 emissions from transporting the beef to market, thus the actual GHG emissions may vary depending on producer countries and distances to markets.
Better waste management and shorter intervals between calving cycles could reduce GHG emissions, the authors suggest. Organic farming methods have also been proven to reduce emissions and energy use considerably, according to a 2003 Swedish study.
In related news, Parliament's temporary committee on climate change met on 17 July in Brussels to discuss the EU's stated goal of reducing CO2 emissions by 20% by 2020. MEPs debated policy options with a Commission official present at the meeting, who emphasised the role that developing countries need to play in reducing CO2 emissions.
The Commission is hoping to advance international cooperation on climate change at the December 2007 UN Climate Change Conference in Bali.
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MessageSujet: Re: Meat    Ven 7 Sep - 6:33

February 20 , 2007

Energy

Feeding our appetite for flesh requires fuel to produce fertilizer for crops to feed the animals, oil to run the trucks that take them to slaughter, electricity to freeze their carcasses, and more. E, the respected environmental magazine, noted in 2002 that more than one-third of all fossil fuels produced in the United States are used to raise animals for food.21 This makes sense, since 80 percent of all agricultural land in the U.S. is used by the meat and dairy industries (this includes, of course, the land used to raise crops to feed them).

Simply add up the energy-intensive stages: (1) grow massive amounts of corn, grain, and soybeans (with all the required tilling, irrigation, crop dusters, and so on); (2) transport the grain and soybeans to manufacturers of feed on gas-guzzling, pollution-spewing 18-wheelers; (3) operate the feed mills (requiring massive energy expenditures); (4) transport the feed to the factory farms (again, in inefficient vehicles); (5) operate the factory farms; (6) truck the animals many miles to slaughter; (7) operate the slaughterhouse; (
transport the meat to processing plants; (9) operate the meat-processing plants; (10) transport the meat to grocery stores; (11) keep the meat refrigerated or frozen in the stores, until it's sold. Every single stage involves heavy pollution, massive amounts of greenhouse gases, and massive amounts of energy.

Most of us turn off the lights when we leave a room and attempt to conserve energy in other ways, but eating meat is the most inefficient and resource-intensive thing we do. If we Americans cut our meat consumption, our oil problems would be drastically reduced.
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MessageSujet: Re: Meat    Ven 7 Sep - 6:34

February the 20th of 2007

Wasted resources

Raising animals for food requires massive amounts of
land, food, energy, and water and contributes to animal suffering.

Water

Between watering the crops that farmed animals eat, providing drinking water for billions of animals each year, and cleaning away the filth in factory farms, transport trucks, and slaughterhouses, the farmed animal industry places a serious strain on our water supply. Nearly half of all the water used in the United States goes to raising animals for food. It takes 5,000 gallons of water to produce 1 pound of meat, while growing 1 pound of wheat only requires 25 gallons. A totally vegetarian diet requires only 300 gallons of water per day, while a meat-eating diet requires more than 4,000 gallons of water per day.24,25 You save more water by not eating a pound of beef than you do by not showering for an entire year.

While millions of people across the globe are faced with droughts and water shortages, much of the world's water supply is quietly being diverted to animal agriculture. As the Western diet spreads to the rest of the world, even desert nations in Africa and the Middle East are pouring what little water they have into meat production. It is clear that raising animals for food puts a tremendous strain on our already limited water supply, and water is used much more efficiently when it goes toward producing crops for human consumption.


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MessageSujet: Re: Meat    Ven 7 Sep - 6:34

Februayr 20th , 2007

Rainforest


Eating chickens destroys the rainforest. That's the message of a major environmental organization alarmed at the rapidly increasing destruction of the Amazon rainforest in Brazil. According to the nonprofit group Greenpeace, all the wild animals and trees in more than 2.9 million acres of rainforest were destroyed in the 2004-2005 crop season in order to grow crops that are used to feed chickens and other animals in factory farms.1 While many of the world's largest meat, egg, and dairy-products companies are responsible for this, Greenpeace blames the notorious animal-abusing company KFC for leading the way in laying waste to the Amazon—check out the giant banner below that Greenpeace activists displayed in Brazil.

One of the main common crops grown in the rainforest is soy—in fact, much of the enormous amount of soy that is needed to feed the world’s farmed animals now comes from the rainforest. (The soy that is used in veggie burgers, tofu, and soy milk in the United States is almost exclusively grown domestically, not in the Amazon.) A whopping 80 percent of the world's soy crop is used to feed farmed animals.3 It is hugely inefficient to feed crops to farmed animals instead of eating the crops ourselves; it takes up to 16 pounds of grain to produce just 1 pound of animal flesh.4 If we simply ate soy and other plant foods ourselves instead of feeding them to farmed animals, we would not need to raise nearly as much crops and we could eliminate the need to decimate the rainforest. On top of all that, by eating only plant foods instead of animal flesh, we would have enough food to feed every person in the world, making an enormous impact in the struggle against
world hunger.

KFC doesn't just torture hundreds of millions of chickens; it also destroys the rainforest. So, basically, by enjoying a Boca Chik'n Patty instead of gnawing on a KFC drumstick, you can help to prevent cruelty to animals, battle global hunger, and protect the rainforest! For some delicious chicken—and rainforest—friendly recipes, visit VegCooking.com. Then check out KentuckyFriedCruelty.com for information about how you can help stop KFC's animal-abusing ways.

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MessageSujet: Re: Meat    Ven 7 Sep - 6:35

February 20 , 2007

Animal Suffering

Caring for the environment means protecting all of our planet's inhabitants. Animals on modern factory farms are deprived of everything that is natural to them, and they are treated in ways that would warrant felony cruelty-to-animals charges if the victims were dogs or cats. Chickens' beaks are sliced off with a hot blade, pigs' tails are chopped off and their teeth clipped with pliers, and male cows and pigs are castrated, all without any pain relief. The animals are confined to crowded, filthy warehouses and dosed with powerful drugs to make them grow so quickly that their hearts and limbs often cannot keep up—they frequently become crippled or suffer from heart attacks when they're only a few weeks old. Finally, at the slaughterhouse, they are hung upside-down and their throats are slit, often while they are still conscious. What kind of environmentalist can support any of that
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MessageSujet: Re: Meat    Ven 7 Sep - 8:10

Pollution

Animals raised for food produce 89,000 pounds of waste per second. What do we get back from all the grain, fossil fuels, and water that go into making animal products? Tons and tons of feces. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the run-off from factory farms pollutes our waterways more than all other industrial sources combined.27

Fecal contamination

Animals raised for food produce 130 times as much excrement as the entire U.S. population, roughly 89,000 pounds per second, all without the benefit of waste treatment systems.28 According to the Union of Concerned Scientists, animals on factory farms in America produce 20 tons of fecal matter each year for every U.S. household.29 A pig farm with 5,000 animals produces as much fecal waste as a city of 50,000 people.30 According to Oregon State University agriculture professor Peter Cheeke, factory farming constitutes "a frontal assault on the environment, with massive groundwater and air pollution problems."

A contamination study conducted by John Chastain, a Minnesota agricultural extension engineer, reports, "The data indicates that the pollution strength of raw manure is 160 times greater than raw municipal sewage."31 In other words, farmed animal waste is much more dangerous than human waste. There are no federal guidelines that regulate how factory farms treat, store, and dispose of the trillions of pounds of concentrated, untreated animal excrement that they produce each year. This waste may be left to rot in huge lagoons or sprayed over crop fields; both of these disposal methods result in run-off that contaminates the soil and water and kills fish and other wildlife. The concentration of parasites, bacteria, and chemical contaminates in animal excrement can wreak havoc on the ecosystems affected by farm run-off, and there are countless reports that humans who live near these farms have become very sick from the pollution.

A Scripps Howard synopsis of a Senate Agricultural Committee report on farm pollution issued this warning about animal waste: "It's untreated and unsanitary, bubbling with chemicals and diseased. It goes onto the soil and into the water that many people will, ultimately, bathe in and wash their clothes with and drink. It is poisoning rivers and killing fish and making people sick. Catastrophic cases of pollution, sickness, and death are occurring in areas where livestock operations are concentrated. … Every place where the animal factories have located, neighbors have complained of falling sick."






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MessageSujet: Re: Meat    Ven 7 Sep - 8:11

february the 15th of 2007

The air we breathe


Factory farms produce millions of pounds of dust each year-this dust contains feces, mold, and bacteria, and it causes humans who live around the farms to become ill. Factory farms also produce massive amounts of dust and other contamination that pollutes our air. A study in Texas found that animal feedlots in the state produce more than 14 million pounds of particulate dust every year and that the dust “contains biologically active organisms such as bacteria, mold, and fungi from the feces and the feed.” The massive amounts of excrement produced by these farms emit toxic gases such as hydrogen sulfide and ammonia into the air. The EPA reports that roughly 80 percent of ammonia emissions in the United States come from animal waste.As if the chemicals and particulate matter from animal waste weren’t bad enough, the meat and dairy industries often knowingly add to the air-quality crisis. When the cesspools holding tons of urine and feces get full, factory farms will frequently get around water pollution limits by spraying liquid manure into the air, creating mists that are carried away by the wind. People who live nearby are forced to inhale the toxins and pathogens from the sprayed manure. Learn more about how pollution from factory farms affects human health. According to a report by the California State Senate, “Studies have shown that [animal waste] lagoons emit toxic airborne chemicals that can cause inflammatory, immune, irritation and neurochemical problems in humans.”
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