AccueilFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
Aller à la page : Précédent  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Suivant
AuteurMessage
saveallGOD'sAnimals
Admin


Masculin Nombre de messages : 19955
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme   Mer 5 Jan - 8:32

JANUARY 5, 2011

January Sale
Save Now on Light Therapy!
*see below for details

Although researchers don't have firm numbers, many people are light deprived.

Symptoms of light deprivation include:

1. Feeling depressed or moody

2. Fatigue, lack of energy, and difficulty getting up in the morning

3. Problems getting things done (lack of motivation)

4. Reduced social contact (often reduced sexual interest)

5. Cravings for carbohydrate and weight gain

6. Insomnia

Dr. Fuhrman recommends light therapy for
Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), depression and other conditions.


Read more about light therapy and treating depression naturally in
Dr. Fuhrman's Healthy Times Newsletter, Issue # 24, March 2006
All of Dr. Fuhrman's Healthy Times Newsletters are available free of charge with membership

To compliment his nutritional program,
Dr. Fuhrman has researched the lights on the market and recommends this
Therapeutic Light which contains the features that medical literature
reveals are critical to the effectiveness of light therapy .



January only special:
Therapeautic Light
$213.95 $199.00*

*Offer expires 1/31/11

To learn more or to purchase visit www.drfuhrman.com
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
saveallGOD'sAnimals
Admin


Masculin Nombre de messages : 19955
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme   Mer 5 Jan - 8:38

JANUARY 4, 2011

Newsletter No. 24
March 2006
What's Inside: In this issue, depression and related mood disorders are discussed:

Treating Depression Naturally — Antidepressant drug manufacturers have been forced to issue new warning labels about clinical worsening and increased suicidal risk, but these drugs have a litany of adverse effects. Recent advances in non-pharmacologic treatments for depression can help people feel better.
Lighting the Way to Wellness — Therapeutic light is an effective treatment for Major Depressive Disorder, Dysthymia, Bipolar Depression, Seasonal Depressive Disorder, PMS, Insomnia, ADHD, ADD and Bulimia Nervosa.
Nutrition & Mood Disorders — Nutritional excellence is important for brain function. Without adequate micronutrient intake in our diet, our internal environment becomes toxic. Studies linked these toxins to depression, heart disease, asthma, Alzheimer's and more.
Decadent Desserts — Mouthwatering delicacies that are bound to lift your spirits. Decadent healthy chocolate cake with chocolate/macadamia/hazelnut icing. Also, pomegranate poached pears with chocolate & raspberry sauces.
Fish Oils for Mood Disorder Prevention — Depression is related to low levels of these long chain omega-3 fats in the brain, and it is apparent that supplementation with DHA and EPA have beneficial results in patients with mood disorders.

**To find out about our ordering options for the Healthy Times Newsletter. Click Here.

Note: All newsletters are downloadable for FREE with a subscription to the Member Center.

Already a member! Click here and login to gain immediate access to this newsletter!

https://www.drfuhrman.com/library/newsletter_24.aspx
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
saveallGOD'sAnimals
Admin


Masculin Nombre de messages : 19955
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme   Jeu 6 Jan - 15:44

JANUARY 4, 2011

Block Diabetes" with NBA Champion John Salley: New TV and Radio Spot


Nearly 24 million people in the United States have diabetes. But in “Block Diabetes,” PCRM’s new TV and radio spot, NBA champion John Salley lets you know it doesn’t have to be this way.



In the new 30-second public service announcements, Salley, who has played for the Los Angeles Lakers, Detroit Pistons, and Chicago Bulls, tells you how to fight diabetes by making healthful food choices.

“I’ll bet you know someone with type 2 diabetes,” says Salley in the spots. “Now, this can lead to heart problems, strokes, and even blindness. ... You can up your defenses by eating more fruits and vegetables and having more vegetarian and vegan meals.”

One-third of children born in 2000 will be diagnosed with diabetes in his or her lifetime. The total cost of diagnosed diabetes in the United States in 2007 was $174 billion. Diabetes contributes to more than 200,000 deaths a year in the United States.

But plant-based diets help prevent the disease. And clinical research shows that a low-fat vegan diet treats type 2 diabetes more effectively than a standard diabetes diet and may be more effective than single-agent therapy with oral diabetes drugs.

The John Salley spots also recommend BlockDiabetes.org for tips on preventing and managing diabetes. The PCRM website features Food for Life TV, a free online video support group that offers nutrition information and cooking demonstrations of easy-to-prepare recipes.

To learn more about how you can prevent diabetes, visit BlockDiabetes.org.

http://www.pcrm.org/newsletter/jan11/salley.html
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
saveallGOD'sAnimals
Admin


Masculin Nombre de messages : 19955
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme   Jeu 6 Jan - 15:45

JANUARY 4, 2011

Continuing Education: Nutritional Interventions for Diabetes and Other Chronic Diseases


Next month, the Nutritional Interventions for Diabetes and Other Chronic Diseases continuing education program will teach health care professionals a plant-based approach for treating chronic diseases.

This daylong program that takes place on Saturday, Feb. 26, 2011, in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., will explore the growing body of scientific evidence that supports plant-based nutrition for prevention and reversal of heart disease, diabetes, certain cancers, and other chronic diseases.

According to the American Dietetic Association, “Appropriately planned vegetarian diets, including total vegetarian or vegan diets, are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases.” And the American Diabetes Association’s position statement states that “plant-based diets (vegan or vegetarian) that are well planned and nutritionally adequate have also been shown to improve metabolic control.”

“This nutrition approach brings hope that the prevalence and progression of these pervasive conditions can be halted,” says Caroline Trapp, M.S.N., C.D.E., PCRM’s director of diabetes education and care. “A plant-based diet has been demonstrated to be safe, effective, affordable, sustainable, and nutritionally adequate.”

Nurses, dietitians, certified diabetes educators, physicians, and other health care professionals will:

Learn an easy-to-implement approach with proven results.
Add a new treatment option to fight diabetes, heart disease, and other chronic diseases.
Explore practical strategies and receive useful resources for medical management of patients implementing a new dietary approach.
Enjoy a delicious lunch and earn continuing education credits.
In addition to Trapp, speakers include Neal Barnard, M.D., PCRM president and nutrition researcher, and Elizabeth Seeley, R.D., L.D., PCRM Food for Life instructor and public health nutritionist.

Nutritional Interventions for Diabetes and Other Chronic Diseases will offer continuing education credits under the auspices of The George Washington University Medical Center’s Office of Continuing Education in the Health Professions. Credits are pending for physicians, nurses, registered dietitians, and registered dietitian technicians. This activity is sponsored by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine.

For more details, visit PCRM.org/Feb26.

http://www.pcrm.org/newsletter/jan11/continuing_ed.html
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
saveallGOD'sAnimals
Admin


Masculin Nombre de messages : 19955
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme   Jeu 6 Jan - 15:46

JANUARY 4, 2011

Gordon Ramsay, Trisha Yearwood Make PCRM's Five Worst Cookbooks of 2010 List


Who’s on PCRM’s five worst cookbooks of 2010 list? Gordon Ramsay and Trisha Yearwood—among others—published books encouraging readers to fill up on high-fat, meat-heavy meals.

So dietitians with PCRM reviewed last year’s cookbooks and named the worst offenders that are contributing to America’s record obesity levels and skyrocketing diabetes rates. These are the five worst cookbooks of 2010:

Gordon Ramsay's World Kitchen: Recipes from The F-Word
By Gordon Ramsay
Kitchen Nightmares and Hell’s Kitchen are Gordon Ramsay’s TV shows, but they also aptly describe the recipes from his latest book. Read more >



Home Cooking with Trisha Yearwood
By Tricia Yearwood
Country singer Trisha Yearwood won Grammys for her songs, “How Do I Live” and “I Fall to Pieces.” This year she released another heartbreaking work. Read more >



How to Cook Like a Top Chef
By the creators of Top Chef
The reality show Top Chef has a ruthless elimination round for contestants. Unfortunately, many of their unhealthy recipes still found their way into the program’s cookbook. Read more >



Barefoot Contessa How Easy Is That?: Fabulous Recipes & Easy Tips
By Ina Garten
Ina Garten—host of the Food Network’s Barefoot Contessa—can’t leave well enough alone when it comes to vegetables. In her new book, she weaponizes simple, healthy vegetables with meat and dairy products. Read more >




The Primal Blueprint Cookbook: Primal, Low Carb, Paleo, Grain-Free, Dairy-Free and Gluten-Free
By Mark Sisson and Jennifer Meier
The Primal Blueprint sets back evidence-based nutrition nearly 2 million years with its meat-heavy diet. Read more >

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
saveallGOD'sAnimals
Admin


Masculin Nombre de messages : 19955
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme   Jeu 6 Jan - 15:47

JANUARY 4, 2011

The Five Worst Cookbooks of 2010

A Report from the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine
December 2010

Some popular cookbooks of 2010, including recipe collections from top chefs and celebrities, encourage Americans to fill up on high-fat, meat-heavy meals, even as the country struggles with record obesity levels and skyrocketing diabetes rates. Dietitians with the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine reviewed the year’s new cookbooks and named the worst offenders.

Here are the five worst cookbooks of 2010:


Gordon Ramsay's World Kitchen: Recipes from The F-Word
By Gordon Ramsay
Kitchen Nightmares and Hell’s Kitchen are Gordon Ramsay’s TV shows, but they also aptly describe the recipes in his latest book. Ramsay has traveled to the ends of the Earth to bring back dishes that will wreak havoc on your health. Choose British Pheasant Casserole (two pheasants, smoked bacon, butter, and double cream) for the kind of meaty, high-fat meal that promotes obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. Or try Thai Pork Satay to spike cholesterol levels.

Home Cooking with Trisha Yearwood
By Trisha Yearwood
Country singer Trisha Yearwood won Grammys for her songs, “How Do I Live” and “I Fall to Pieces.” This year she released another heartbreaking work—this collection of high-cholesterol recipes. The Georgia native presents her recipes with family stories and tips, but unfortunately, the book does not take into account the state of Southerners’ health. States in the Southeast have the highest rates of obesity in the nation, but Yearwood’s recipes are loaded with fat and cholesterol. Garth’s Breakfast Bowl, for example, includes eight large eggs, a pound each of bacon and sausage, cheese tortellini, cheddar cheese, tater tots, and butter.

How to Cook Like a Top Chef
By the creators of Top Chef
The reality show Top Chef has a ruthless elimination round for contestants. Unfortunately, many of their unhealthy recipes still found their way into the program’s cookbook. Laurine’s Bacon Donuts are deep-fried and packed with processed meat, which has been linked to increased risk of colon cancer. Hubert Keller’s Mac and Cheese is loaded with fatty dairy products: butter, heavy cream, half-and-half, and Swiss cheese. As if that’s not enough, the recipe also calls for cholesterol-packed egg yolks and 1 pound of shrimp.

Barefoot Contessa How Easy Is That?: Fabulous Recipes & Easy Tips
By Ina Garten
Ina Garten—host of the Food Network’s Barefoot Contessa—can’t leave well enough alone when it comes to vegetables. In her new book, she weaponizes simple, healthy vegetables with high-fat meat and dairy products. Snap peas are laced with pancetta, a processed meat associated with increased cancer risk. Celery Root Puree is spiked with high-cholesterol butter and heavy cream. Recipes for meat dishes, such as Steakhouse Steaks, are pretty straightforward—and so are the heath consequences. In 2010, studies linked meat-heavy diets to increased diabetes risk, weight gain, decreased bone health, and increased bladder cancer risk, among other health problems.

The Primal Blueprint Cookbook: Primal, Low Carb, Paleo, Grain-Free, Dairy-Free and Gluten-Free
By Mark Sisson and Jennifer Meier
The Primal Blueprint sets back evidence-based nutrition nearly 2 million years with its meat-heavy diet. Along with artery-clogging “Paleo” recipes for Primal Pot Roast and Sausage Stew, this book includes an entire section of cholesterol-laden recipes for offal—entrails and internal organs. The authors say recipes like these are ideal for followers of Atkins and other low-carb diets. But a recent study funded by the National Institutes of Health found that a low-carbohydrate diet based on animal food sources increases mortality risk from all causes, including cancer and heart disease.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
saveallGOD'sAnimals
Admin


Masculin Nombre de messages : 19955
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme   Jeu 6 Jan - 15:48

JANUARY 4, 2011

The Best Cookbooks of the Last Decade

A Report from the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine

Dietitians from the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine surveyed cookbooks from the past decade and found some bright spots—cookbooks that stood out above others in helping Americans improve their diets to fight obesity and other chronic diseases. Here are the last decade’s best cookbooks:

The Sublime Restaurant Cookbook
By Nanci Alexander
2009
Nanci Alexander created the award-winning Sublime restaurant in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Now you can make recipes from Sublime’s innovative vegan menu at home. Drawing inspiration from around the globe, the recipes are not only wonderfully healthful and completely cholesterol-free, but each recipe’s exquisite flavors will seduce even the most committed carnivore.



The Kind Diet
By Alicia Silverstone
2009
Actress and activist Alicia Silverstone wrote this cookbook to help others explore the wide-ranging benefits of a plant-based diet. She explains how eliminating harmful foods can have amazing benefits for your health, your appearance, and even the planet. This collection of hearty vegan recipes is full of tips and tools to help people transition to a plant-based diet, which has been shown to reduce the risk of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease.



Skinny Bitch in the Kitch: Kick-Ass Recipes for Hungry Girls Who Want to Stop Cooking Crap (and Start Looking Hot!)
By Rory Freedman and Kim Barnouin
2007
Number one New York Times best-selling authors Rory Freedman and Kim Barnouin wrote this cookbook after their manifesto, Skinny Bitch, sparked a worldwide movement toward healthy eating. The cookbook offers 75 easy, satisfying vegan recipes, served up with an irreverent sense of fun. From the Bitchin’ Breakfast Burrito to Cha Cha Chili, Freedman and Barnouin show readers that you can eat well, enjoy food, and lose weight—all at the same time. Abundant research has shown that people who maintain a healthy weight over the long-term tend to eat a plant-based diet.

The Conscious Cook
By Tal Ronnen
2009
Chef Tal Ronnen cooked for Oprah during her vegan cleanse and catered Ellen DeGeneres and Portia de Rossi’s vegan wedding. In his new cookbook, The Conscious Cook, Ronnen shares his enticing vegan dishes with everyone who enjoys beautiful, flavorful, and filling food. Every recipe delivers on his promise to omnivores and foodies: “You won’t miss the meat.”



The Engine 2 Diet
By Rip Esselstyn
2009
Professional athlete-turned-firefighter Rip Esselstyn is used to responding to emergencies. So when he learned that some of his fellow Engine 2 firefighters in Austin, Texas, were in dire physical condition—several had dangerously high cholesterol levels—he sprang into action and created a lifesaving plan for the firehouse. By following Rip’s program, everyone lost weight (more than 20 pounds, in some cases), lowered their cholesterol, and improved their overall health. Now, Esselstyn outlines his proven plan in The Engine 2 Diet. His plant-powered eating plan is based on a diet of vegetables, whole grains, fruit, legumes, seeds, and nuts.



Cooking the Whole Foods Way
By Christina Pirello
2007
Nutrition educator Christina Pirello was diagnosed with terminal cancer and given a few months to live, but she fought her way back to health using good nutrition. Her cookbook invites health-conscious readers to cut out processed foods, meat, and dairy, and focus on fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole grains. Pirello’s book includes tips on meal planning and shopping to help readers transition to a wholesome vegan diet. Research has shown that people who follow diets low in fat and high in plant foods have a lower risk of developing cancer.Studies have found that a vegan diet can even reduce the risk of recurrence for some types of cancer.

Bryant Terry's Vegan Soul Kitchen
By Bryant Terry
2009
Bryant Terry shows you how to make delicious soul food into delicious health food for the soul. Fabulous and tasty for the picky palate, this cookbook features Baked BBQ Black-Eyed Peas, Savory Triple-Corn Grits, and Blackened Tofu Slabs with Succotash Salsa.

http://pcrm.org/health/reports/Best_Cookbooks_Decade.html
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
saveallGOD'sAnimals
Admin


Masculin Nombre de messages : 19955
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme   Jeu 6 Jan - 15:50

JANUARY 4, 2011

Success! Alamogordo Chimpanzees Will Stay Put for Now


The Alamogordo chimpanzees will have a happy new year. They won’t be moved to a Texas facility where they would have been subjected to invasive experiments.

On New Year’s Eve, Gov. Bill Richardson of New Mexico made the announcement that the transfer is being put on hold while the Institute of Medicine conducts a review of the scientific merits of using chimpanzees in experimentation. This extends PCRM’s window of time for at least 18 months to find a way to keep the chimpanzees permanently out of the laboratory.

Over the past year, PCRM has worked alongside Gov. Richardson and Animal Protection of New Mexico to urge the federal government to keep the 186 chimpanzees permanently out of the Southwest National Primate Research Center in San Antonio.

At a briefing in Washington in November, the governor joined representatives from PCRM in requesting that the U.S. Department of Agriculture use its authority to stop the transfer of retired chimpanzees living at the nonresearch Alamogordo Primate Facility in Alamogordo, N.M.

“The federal government has made a step in the right direction by allowing the Alamogordo chimpanzees to stay in New Mexico,” says PCRM director of research policy Hope Ferdowsian, M.D., M.P.H. “Hopefully, this decision will have favorable implications for all chimpanzees who are currently used in medical experiments in the United States.”

The Alamorgordo chimpanzees have not been used in experiments for about a decade and many suffer from chronic conditions related to old age, captivity, and past use in experiments, including severe heart disease, liver disease, viral infections, and diabetes.

In September, PCRM also filed a federal complaint with Kathleen Sebelius, secretary of Health and Human Services, seeking to stop the planned transfer of the federally owned chimpanzees. The legal petition invoked the Chimpanzee Health Improvement Maintenance and Protection (CHIMP) Act, enacted to ensure that chimpanzees used in experiments for many years are retired to sanctuaries. Twelve authorities, including Dr. Ferdowsian and PCRM senior medical and research adviser John J. Pippin, M.D., F.A.C.C., co-signed the petition.

The doctors and scientists argued in their complaint, “Chimpanzees have repeatedly proved to be poor models for human disease research, including for HIV—a disease for which repeated failures have led most researchers to stop using chimpanzees—as well as for hepatitis, malaria, and cancer. Therefore, these animals are not necessary for this type of research. Superior alternatives are available and researchers continue to develop new, cutting-edge models for human disease research.”

High-profile opposition to the chimpanzee experiments also includes Jane Goodall and True Blood star Kristin Bauer, as well as scientists, doctors, and countless concerned citizens, including thousands of PCRM members.

To follow PCRM's ongoing campaign to keep the Alamogordo chimpanzees permanently out of the laboratory, visit PCRM.org/Alamogordo.

http://www.pcrm.org/newsletter/jan11/alamogordo.html
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
saveallGOD'sAnimals
Admin


Masculin Nombre de messages : 19955
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme   Ven 7 Jan - 16:53

January 3, 2011


Milk Alternatives: 9 Recipes
posted by Melissa Breyer Jan 6, 2011 6:01 am
filed under: Food & Recipes, Drinks, Natural Pantry, agave nectar, almond milk, cashew milk, hemp milk, milk alternatives, nut milk
By the Care2 Green Living Staff

<1 of 3>
There are dozens of methods for making milk alternatives. Some call for the soaking, blanching, and peeling of nuts, some don’t. Some are straightforward, some are more complicated. Raw nuts are often specified to meet the needs of people who prefer raw food, but cooked nuts work just as well. Sweeteners are a big issue here. Agave nectar is a wonderful alternative to honey because it is low on the glycemic index and is vegan—but can be hard to find. Honey and maple syrup are good alternatives to processed sugar. Pitted dates and banana can be used to sweeten as well as to create a thicker texture. I suggest playing around with the recipes here (and the different sweeteners) until you find the perfect fit for your needs. All of these milks need to be refrigerated, and should keep for at least 2 days.

30-SECOND NUT MILK
Inspired by Raw Food, Real World (Regan Books, 2005)
2 heaping tablespoons raw nut butter
2 cups filtered water
Pinch of sea salt
2 tablespoons agave nectar or 1 packet stevia
½ teaspoon vanilla extract
1 tablespoon coconut butter (optional)

1. In a blender, puree all ingredients until smooth.

BASIC ALMOND MILK
1 cup raw almonds, soaked at least 4 hours
3 cups filtered water

1. In a high-speed blender blend the nuts and water for about 2 minutes until the nuts are completely blended.
2. Strain the mix through multiple layers of cheesecloth in a colander two times.

ALMOND NOG
1 batch basic almond milk
5 large soft pitted dates
2 very ripe bananas
1 vanilla bean, scraped
1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
1/8 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 cup raw macadamia nuts (optional)

In a high-speed blender add all ingredients and blend until combined.
Adjust sweetness to taste by adding more or less dates.
The macadamia nuts are optional but they will give the drink a thicker consistency.



Read more: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/milk-alternatives-recipes.html#ixzz1AOf5V4Uz
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
saveallGOD'sAnimals
Admin


Masculin Nombre de messages : 19955
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme   Ven 7 Jan - 16:54

January 4, 2011

Milk Alternatives

CASHEW MILK

1/2 cup raw cashew pieces
2 cups water
1 tablespoon maple syrup

Combine cashews with 1 cup water and maple syrup in blender.
Blend on high until thick and creamy.
Slowly add remaining water and blend on high for 2 minutes.
Strain if desired.

HEMP MILK
Hemp milk contains 33 percent protein and Canadian studies point to hemp protein as being the highest quality found in any plant. Hemp also offers well-balanced essential fatty acids that our bodies require and don’t make themselves. The key for making quick and easy hemp milk is to buy shelled hemp seeds. I called four local natural food stores and all carried shelled hemp seeds, so it is easy to go this route. Otherwise you have to take extra measures to strain out the shells. Check the dates on your seeds to make sure that you buy the freshest seeds possible. Store in a dark place. Sunlight will destroy the oils’ benefits and make the seeds rancid.

¼ cup shelled hemp seeds
1 cup warm water
Flavoring (vanilla, honey, etc.)

1. Combine all the ingredients in a blender.

HORCHATA
1 cup long grain white rice
2 cups almonds
1-inch piece cinnamon bark
8 cups water
1/2 organic sugar (or your favorite sweetener)

1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract

1. Wash and drain the rice.
2. Use a spice grinder, or electric coffee grinder, and grind the rice until fine.

3. Combine rice with the almonds and cinnamon bark. Add 3 1/2 cups water, cover, and let sit overnight.
4. In a blender, blend rice mixture until smooth. Add 2 1/2 cups of water and continue blending. Add sweetener and vanilla extract.
5. Strain horchata with a metal strainer, and then again using a double layer of cheesecloth.
6. Add up to an additional 2 cups of water until it you get the consistency you like.



Read more: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/milk-alternatives-recipes.html#ixzz1AOfGvUs2
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
saveallGOD'sAnimals
Admin


Masculin Nombre de messages : 19955
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme   Ven 7 Jan - 18:29


Milk Alternatives: 9 Recipes
posted by Melissa Breyer Jan 6, 2011 6:01 am
filed under: Food & Recipes, Drinks, Natural Pantry, agave nectar, almond milk, cashew milk, hemp milk, milk alternatives, nut milk
By the Care2 Green Living Staff

<3 of 3>MACADAMIA MILK
Inspired by Raw Food, Real World (Regan Books, 2005)
1 cup macadmaia nuts, soaked 1 hour or more
3 cups filtered water
3 tablespoons agave nectar
2 tablespoons coconut butter (optional)
2 teaspoons vanilla extract (optional)
pinch of sea salt
(optional)

1. In a blender, blend the nuts and water on high speed for about 2 minutes.
2. Add the rest of the ingredients and blend to combine.
3. Strain if you want it super creamy, or drink as is.

OAT MILK
2 cups cooked oatmeal
4 cups water
1 ripe banana
1 teaspoon vanilla
Pinch of salt (optional)
Sweetener to taste (if desired)

1. Place all ingredients in blender and process until smooth about 2-3 minutes.
2. Chill, and shake before using.

RICE MILK
1/2 cup brown rice
8 cups water
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
3 tablespoons maple syrup or honey
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1. Place rice, 8 cups water, and salt in pan.
2. Cover and bring to a boil over high heat, reduce heat to low and simmer 3 hours, or until rice is very soft. (You can also do this in a slow cooker overnight.)
3. In blender, puree rice mixture with remaining ingredients. You will have to do it in two batches. Puree each batch at least 2 or 3 minutes to completely liquefy the rice.
4. Add more water if you prefer it thinner.

For more information on Milk Alternatives, read Milk Alternatives: Easy Greening.



Read more: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/milk-alternatives-recipes.html#ixzz1AP3DduFY
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
saveallGOD'sAnimals
Admin


Masculin Nombre de messages : 19955
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme   Ven 7 Jan - 18:29


Milk Alternatives: 9 Recipes
posted by Melissa Breyer Jan 6, 2011 6:01 am
filed under: Food & Recipes, Drinks, Natural Pantry, agave nectar, almond milk, cashew milk, hemp milk, milk alternatives, nut milk
By the Care2 Green Living Staff

<2 of 3>CASHEW MILK
1/2 cup raw cashew pieces
2 cups water
1 tablespoon maple syrup

Combine cashews with 1 cup water and maple syrup in blender.
Blend on high until thick and creamy.
Slowly add remaining water and blend on high for 2 minutes.
Strain if desired.

HEMP MILK
Hemp milk contains 33 percent protein and Canadian studies point to hemp protein as being the highest quality found in any plant. Hemp also offers well-balanced essential fatty acids that our bodies require and don’t make themselves. The key for making quick and easy hemp milk is to buy shelled hemp seeds. I called four local natural food stores and all carried shelled hemp seeds, so it is easy to go this route. Otherwise you have to take extra measures to strain out the shells. Check the dates on your seeds to make sure that you buy the freshest seeds possible. Store in a dark place. Sunlight will destroy the oils’ benefits and make the seeds rancid.

¼ cup shelled hemp seeds
1 cup warm water
Flavoring (vanilla, honey, etc.)

1. Combine all the ingredients in a blender.

HORCHATA
1 cup long grain white rice
2 cups almonds
1-inch piece cinnamon bark
8 cups water
1/2 organic sugar (or your favorite sweetener)

1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract

1. Wash and drain the rice.
2. Use a spice grinder, or electric coffee grinder, and grind the rice until fine.

3. Combine rice with the almonds and cinnamon bark. Add 3 1/2 cups water, cover, and let sit overnight.
4. In a blender, blend rice mixture until smooth. Add 2 1/2 cups of water and continue blending. Add sweetener and vanilla extract.
5. Strain horchata with a metal strainer, and then again using a double layer of cheesecloth.
6. Add up to an additional 2 cups of water until it you get the consistency you like.



Read more: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/milk-alternatives-recipes.html#ixzz1AP3PQVBg
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
saveallGOD'sAnimals
Admin


Masculin Nombre de messages : 19955
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme   Jeu 13 Jan - 6:27

05 Mai 2010

Grenelle : proposition d'un amendement pour des repas VG

Selon L214 un amendement est proposé par M. Yves Cochet, M. Mamère et M. de Rugy dans le cadre du Grenelle II :

« Dans la restauration collective est organisée une journée hebdomadaire végétarienne (sans viande et sans poisson). »

Bien sûr, il y a peu de chances que cet amendement soit adopté, mais il y a de quoi ouvrir un débat et une initiative à reprendre par les
collectivités territoriales.

Voir l'amendement : http://www.assemblee-nationale.fr/13/amendements/2449/244901070.asp
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
saveallGOD'sAnimals
Admin


Masculin Nombre de messages : 19955
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme   Jeu 13 Jan - 12:26

January 3, 2011


Thank you for your participation in PCRM’s Get Healthy Club Message Board! The message board will no longer be active. But since your involvement in the Get Healthy Club Message Board is so important to us, I want to let you know that you may join our newest message board: the 21-Day Vegan Kickstart Community Forum.
Registering for this message board is available three times a year during the Kickstart. The next one begins Jan. 3, 2011. You can sign up for the Kickstart at 21DayKickstart.org. Once you participate in a Kickstart, you will always have access to the forum. But note that it will only be moderated during the 21 days of the Kickstart.

I hope you will also continue to stay connected by tuning in to our Food for Life TV webcasts each Thursday.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
saveallGOD'sAnimals
Admin


Masculin Nombre de messages : 19955
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme   Jeu 13 Jan - 12:27

January 2, 2011




Nutrition News – Lectures by Neal Barnard, M.D. – Cooking Demonstrations – Your Questions Answered – Shopping Tips – Restaurant Reviews – And More!

Watch new episodes every Thursday.
View any of the many archived shows.
Sign up for a weekly e-mail reminder.
Jan. 13: Get Plant-Strong with Engine 2 Diet Author Rip Esselstyn



If you’ve been following the 21-Day Vegan Kickstart, you know from Rip Esselstyn, author of The Engine 2 Diet, that eating a plant-strong diet is the best way to fight the dangerous fires raging inside us—heart attack, stroke, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, and diabetes. To make one of his favorite firefighting recipes, watch Food for Life TV host Jill Eckart, C.H.H.C., prepare Rip Esselstyn’s Vegetarian Sandwich Wrap.

Core Classes

Type 1 Diabetes
Neal Barnard, M.D., gives an overview of how insulin is made. He also explains that type 1 diabetes is caused when the body produces no insulin. Research shows that this may occur when antibodies in your body fight off proteins found in cow’s milk. Dr. Barnard also outlines how people already diagnosed with type 1 diabetes can cut down on diabetes complications by eating foods that are vegan, low in fat, and have a low gylcemic index.
A New Approach to Type 2 Diabetes
Neal Barnard, M.D., gives an overview of the worldwide diabetes epidemic and what causes diabetes. He asks viewers to imagine how a key works with a lock. If the lock is jammed with gum, the key won’t work. Diabetes occurs when fat gums up cells, stopping insulin from working with cells. But there’s reason to be optimistic. Dr. Barnard explains how building your meal with fruits, vegetables, grains, and beans can help prevent and reverse diabetes.
The Science Behind A New Diet for Diabetes
Neal Barnard, M.D., gives a lecture on the science behind a new diet for diabetes; Caroline Trapp, M.S.N., C.D.E., presents: Know Your Numbers; Susan Levin, M.S., R.D., and Jill Eckart, C.H.H.C., share a success story and answer your questions; Lisa Davis demonstrates Low-Fat Guacamole.
What Do You Have to Lose?
Neal Barnard, M.D., gives a lecture on diet and weight loss; Caroline Trapp, M.S.N., C.D.E., presents: Know Your Numbers, Part II; Susan Levin, M.S., R.D., and Jill Eckart, C.H.H.C., present “What’s In Your Cart: Carrots and Hummus”; Robyn Webb demonstrates how to make Spinach, Orange, and Beet Salad.
All About The Glycemic Index
Neal Barnard, M.D., explains the glycemic index—a handy tool that lets you know which are the best carbohydrate-containing foods. It shows what foods cause blood sugar to rise rapidly compared to those that cause it to rise gently. It's a useful tool for managing diabetes and boosting your energy with low-glycemic index foods that cause your blood sugars to rise gently.
Return to Diabetes main page

http://www.pcrm.org/health/diabetes/support_group.html
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
saveallGOD'sAnimals
Admin


Masculin Nombre de messages : 19955
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme   Ven 14 Jan - 6:43

16 septmebre 2010

Sortie de la nouvelle position de l'Association américaine de diététique sur le végétarisme en français

J'ai le plaisir de vous annoncer la sortie de la traduction en français de la nouvelle position de l'Association américaine de diététique 2009 sur le végétarisme et le végétalisme.
La présentation de ce document imite celle de l'original en anglais.
Ce document est une référence scientifique internationale sur les alimentations végétariennes et végétaliennes.

Si vous êtes végétarien, végétalien, à tendance végétarienne ou si vous souhaitez le devenir, vous êtes vivement encouragé à lire ce document.
Il vous permettra d'optimiser votre façon de vous alimenter, de prendre conscience des avantages de telles alimentations pour votre santé ainsi que de mieux argumenter votre choix alimentaire auprès de vos amis.

Je vous encourage également vivement à imprimer ce document et à l'offrir à votre médecin traitant ainsi que tout professionnel de santé que vous pourriez rencontrer.

Cette revue de la littérature a été publié en 2009 dans la grande revue internationale Journal of the AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION.

Bonne lecture,

Jérôme pour l'APSARES
http://www.alimentation-responsable.com/

Si vous avez un blog, une page Facebook ou un site Internet, je vous encourage à publier le dit document afin de lui offrir une visibilité maximale.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
saveallGOD'sAnimals
Admin


Masculin Nombre de messages : 19955
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme   Ven 14 Jan - 6:44

Position officielle de l’Association américaine de
diététique au sujet de l’alimentation végétarienne
Végétarisme et végétalisme
en résumé
La position de l’Association américaine
de diététique est que les
alimentations végétariennes bien
conçues (y compris végétaliennes)
sont bonnes pour la santé, adéquates
sur le plan nutritionnel et peuvent
être bénéfiques pour la prévention et
le traitement de certaines maladies.
Les alimentations végétariennes
bien conçues sont appropriées à tous
les âges de la vie, y compris pendant
la grossesse, l’allaitement, la petite
enfance, l’enfance et l’adolescence,
ainsi que pour les sportifs. Par définition,
l’alimentation végétarienne exclut
la viande (y compris les volailles),
les animaux marins et tout produit
contenant ces aliments. Ce document
passe en revue les données actuelles
concernant les nutriments importants
pour les végétariens, notamment
les protéines, les acides gras
oméga-3, le fer, le zinc, l’iode, le calcium
et les vitamines D et B12. L’alimentation
végétarienne peut couvrir
les apports conseillés2 pour tous ces
nutriments. Dans certains cas, des
aliments enrichis ou des suppléments
peuvent apporter les quantités requises
de certains nutriments importants.
Une analyse fondée sur des
preuves a montré que les alimentations
végétariennes pouvaient être
adaptées à la grossesse sur le plan
nutritionnel et se traduire par des
avantages en termes de santé pour la
mère et le nouveau-né. Les résultats
d’une analyse fondée sur des preuves
ont montré que l’alimentation végétarienne
est associée à un moindre
risque de décès par cardiopathie ischémique.
Les végétariens présentent
aussi des niveaux plus faibles de
Cette position officielle de l’Association américaine de diététique (ADA)
comprend une revue indépendante de la littérature par ses auteurs en
plus de la revue systématique menée en utilisant le processus d’analyse
des preuves de l’ADA et des données provenant de la Bibliothèque d’Analyse
des Preuves1. Les thèmes provenant de la Bibliothèque d’Analyse des
Preuves (EAL®) sont clairement présentés. L’utilisation d’une approche
fondée sur des preuves présente d’importants avantages par rapport
aux méthodes précédemment utilisées. Le principal avantage de cette
approche est une définition plus stricte des critères d’analyse utilisés, ce
qui minimise le risque de biais lié à l’auteur et facilite la comparaison
d’articles disparates. Pour une description détaillée des méthodes utilisées
dans le processus d’analyse des preuves, consultez le document
« Evidence Analysis Process » à l’adresse http://adaeal.com/eaprocess/.
Pour chacune des conclusions officielles, un groupe d’experts attribue
un niveau de preuve qui est fondé sur l’analyse systématique et l’évaluation
des preuves appuyant cette recherche. Niveau I = Bon ; Niveau II
= Assez bon ; Niveau III = Limité ; Niveau IV = Avis d’expert uniquement ;
Niveau V = Non évaluable (parce qu’il n’y a aucune donnée pour appuyer
ou pour réfuter la conclusion). Des documents basés sur des preuves sur
ce sujet ainsi que d’autres thèmes peuvent être consultés à l’adresse
https://www.adaevidencelibrary.com. Les non-membres peuvent s’abonner
sur https://www.adaevidencelibrary.com/store.cfm.
cholestérol LDL, une tension artérielle
plus faible et sont moins sujets
à l’hypertension et au diabète de type
2 que les non-végétariens. En outre,
les végétariens tendent à avoir des
indices de masse corporelle (IMC)
plus bas et moins de cancers en général.
Les caractéristiques d’une alimentation
végétarienne susceptible
de réduire le risque de maladies chroniques
sont : des apports plus faibles
en acides gras saturés et cholestérol,
et des apports plus élevés en fruits,
légumes, céréales complètes, fruits à
coque, produits à base de soja, fibres
et phytonutriments. Du fait de la
diversité des pratiques alimentaires
parmi les végétariens, il est essentiel
d’évaluer au cas par cas si l’alimentation
est appropriée sur le plan nutritionnel.
En plus de cette évaluation,
les professionnels de la nutrition peuvent
jouer un rôle clé en informant
les végétariens sur les sources ali-
0002-8223/09/10907-0019$36.00/0
doi: 10.1016/j.jada.2009.05.027
mentaires de nutriments spécifiques,
l’achat de nourriture et sa préparation
et les modifications alimentaires
visant à satisfaire leurs besoins.
J Am Diet Assoc. (Journal de l’Association
américaine de diététique)
2009;109: 1266-1282
POSITION OFFICIELLE
La position de l’Association américaine
de diététique est que les alimentations
végétariennes (y compris végétaliennes)
bien conçues sont bonnes
pour la santé, adéquates sur le plan
nutritionnel et peuvent être bénéfiques
pour la prévention et le traitement
de certaines maladies. Les alimentations
végétariennes bien conçues sont
appropriées à tous les âges de la vie,
y compris pendant la grossesse,
l’allaitement, la petite enfance, l’enfance
et l’adolescence, ainsi que pour
les sportifs.
July 2009 Volume 109 Number 7 Journal of the AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION 1267
LE VÉGÉTARISME ET SON CONTEXTE
Un végétarien est une personne qui
ne mange ni viande (y compris volailles),
ni animaux marins, ni aucun
produit contenant ces aliments. Les
pratiques alimentaires des végétariens
peuvent varier considérablement.
Les ovo-lacto-végétariens basent
leur alimentation sur les céréales,
les légumes, les fruits, les légumineuses,
les graines, les fruits à coque,
les produits laitiers et les oeufs.
Les lacto-végétariens excluent les
oeufs en plus de la viande, du poisson
et de la volaille. Le modèle alimentaire
des végétaliens, ou végétariens
stricts, exclut aussi les oeufs, les produits
laitiers et autres aliments d’origine
animale. Même au sein de chacun
de ces modèles alimentaires, il
peut exister des variations considérables
en fonction des produits animaux
exclus.
Une analyse fondée sur des preuves a
été utilisée afin d’évaluer les études
existantes traitant des différents
types d’alimentations végétariennes
(1). Une question a été définie pour
une analyse fondée sur des preuves :
quels sont les types d’alimentations
végétariennes examinés dans les
études ? Les résultats complets de
cette analyse fondée sur des preuves
sont consultables sur le site Internet
de l’EAL (www.adaevidencelibrary.
com) et sont résumés ci-dessous.
Conclusion officielle de l’EAL : Les
deux définitions les plus courantes
des alimentations végétariennes dans
les études sont le végétalisme (alimentation
excluant tout produit d’origine
animale) et le végétarisme (alimentation
excluant toute chair
animale mais incluant oeufs -ovo- ou
produits laitiers -lacto-). Toutefois, ces
deux catégories très larges masquent
d’importantes variations au sein des
alimentations végétariennes et des
pratiques alimentaires. Ces variations
rendent difficile la catégorisation
des pratiques alimentaires végétariennes
et peuvent être à l’origine,
entre autres, de la difficulté à effectuer
un lien clair entre l’alimentation
végétarienne et d’autres facteurs.
Niveau II = Assez bon.
Dans le présent article, le terme
végétarien sera utilisé pour désigner
globalement les personnes ayant opté
pour une alimentation ovo-lacto-végétarienne,
lacto-végétarienne ou
végétalienne, sauf mention contraire.
Bien que les alimentations ovo-lactovégétariennes,
lacto-végétariennes et
végétaliennes soient les plus couramment
étudiées, les praticiens peuvent
être amenés à rencontrer d’autres
types d’alimentations végétariennes
ou semi-végétariennes. Par exemple,
les personnes pratiquant l’alimentation
macrobiotique décrivent généralement
leur alimentation comme
étant végétarienne. L’alimentation
macrobiotique repose essentiellement
sur les céréales, les légumineuses et
les légumes. Les fruits à coque, fruits
frais et graines sont consommés
dans une moindre mesure. Certaines
personnes pratiquant l’alimentation
macrobiotique ne sont pas vraiment
végétariennes car elles mangent du
poisson en faible quantité. L’alimentation
traditionnelle indo-asiatique
est principalement basée sur des aliments
végétaux et est souvent lactovégétarienne,
bien que le phénomène
d’acculturation engendre souvent des
changements comme une augmentation
de la consommation de fromage
et un éloignement de l’alimentation
végétarienne. L’alimentation crudivore
peut être une alimentation végétalienne
et consister essentiellement
ou exclusivement en aliments non
cuits et non transformés. Les aliments
consommés incluent les fruits,
les légumes, les fruits à coque, les
graines, les graines germées et les
haricots germés ; dans de rares cas
des produits laitiers non pasteurisés
et même de la viande ou du poisson
cru peuvent être consommés. Les alimentations
fruitariennes sont des
alimentations végétaliennes basées
sur la consommation de fruits, fruits
à coque et graines. Les légumes
comme les avocats et les tomates,
classés dans les fruits en botanique,
sont généralement inclus dans les
alimentations fruitariennes ; les
autres légumes, les céréales, les légumineuses
et les produits animaux
sont exclus. Certaines personnes
vont se présenter comme étant végétariennes
mais manger du poisson,
du poulet, voire de la viande. Ces « végétariens
autoproclamés » peuvent
être définis comme « semi-végétariens
» dans les études médicales.
Une évaluation individuelle est nécessaire
pour connaître précisément
la qualité nutritionnelle de l’alimentation
d’un végétarien ou d’un végétarien
autoproclamé. Les raisons les
plus courantes amenant à choisir une
alimentation végétarienne sont des
préoccupations concernant la santé,
la protection de l’environnement et le
bien-être animal. Les végétariens invoquent
également des raisons économiques,
des considérations éthiques,
le problème de la faim dans le monde
et des convictions religieuses.
LES TEN DANCES DES CONS OMM ATEURS
(aux États-Unis)
En 2006, d’après un sondage réalisé à
l’échelle nationale, environ 2,3 % de
la population américaine adulte (soit
4,9 millions de personnes) avaient
une alimentation végétarienne permanente
et déclaraient ne jamais
manger viande, poisson ou volaille
(2). Environ 1,4 % de la population
adulte était végétalienne (2). En
2005, d’après un sondage réalisé à
l’échelle nationale, 3 % des enfants et
adolescents de 8 à 18 ans étaient végétariens
; près de 1 % étaient végétaliens
(3). De nombreux consommateurs
déclarent s’intéresser aux
alimentations végétariennes (4) et
22 % déclarent consommer régulièrement
des substituts de produits carnés
(5). Les autres signes de l’intérêt
croissant suscité par les alimentations
végétariennes sont l’apparition
de cours sur la nutrition végétarienne
et sur les droits des animaux dans les
universités ; la multiplication de sites
Internet, de périodiques et de livres
de cuisine ayant pour thème le végétarisme
; de même que la disposition
du public à commander un repas végétarien
en cas de repas pris à l’extérieur.
Certains restaurants ont réagi
à cet intérêt à l’égard des alimentations
végétariennes. Une enquête
réalisée auprès de chefs de cuisine a
montré que les plats végétariens
étaient considérés comme « populaires
» ou « éternels favoris » par 71 %
des clients ; 63 % pour les plats végétaliens
(6). Les fast-foods commencent
à proposer des salades, des hamburgers
végétariens et autres options
sans viande. La plupart des services
de restauration universitaire proposent
des options végétariennes.
1268 Journal of the AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION July 2009 Volume 109 Number 7
DISPONIBILITÉ DE NOUVEAUX PRODUITS
(aux États-Unis)
Le marché américain de produits
transformés pour végétariens (comme
les produits simili-carnés, les laits végétaux
et les plats végétariens remplaçant
directement la viande et les
autres produits animaux) était estimé
à 1,17 milliard de dollars en 2006
(7). D’après les prévisions, ce marché
devrait s’élever à 1,6 milliard d’ici
2011 (7). On prévoit que la disponibilité
de nouveaux produits, notamment
des aliments enrichis et des
aliments prêts à l’emploi, aura un impact
sur les apports nutritionnels des
végétariens qui décident de consommer
ces produits. De nouveaux aliments
enrichis comme les laits de
soja, les aliments simili-carnés, les
jus de fruits et les céréales pour petit
déjeuner sont continuellement mis
sur le marché. Ces produits, en plus
des compléments alimentaires qui
sont largement disponibles dans les
supermarchés et les magasins de produits
naturels, peuvent augmenter
considérablement les apports des végétariens
en nutriments clés comme
le calcium, le fer, le zinc, la vitamine
B12, la vitamine D, la vitamine B2 et
les acides gras oméga-3 à longue
chaîne. Avec autant de produits enrichis
désormais disponibles, le statut
nutritionnel du végétarien-type devrait
être de nos jours grandement
amélioré par rapport à celui d’un
végétarien d’il y a dix ou vingt ans.
Cette amélioration serait renforcée
par une meilleure connaissance, parmi
la population végétarienne, de
l’équilibre alimentaire végétarien.
De ce fait, les données des études anciennes
peuvent ne pas être représentatives
du statut nutritionnel des
végétariens d’aujourd’hui.

1
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
saveallGOD'sAnimals
Admin


Masculin Nombre de messages : 19955
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme   Ven 14 Jan - 6:45

CONSÉ QUEN CES DU VÉGÉTARISME
SUR LA SANTÉ
Les alimentations végétariennes sont
souvent associées à de nombreux
avantages pour la santé, parmi lesquels
de plus bas niveaux de cholestérol
sanguin, un plus faible risque de
maladies cardiaques, une tension artérielle
plus basse et un moindre
risque d’hypertension et de diabète de
type 2. Les végétariens ont tendance
à avoir un indice de masse corporelle
(IMC) plus bas et moins de cancers en
général. Les alimentations végétariennes
tendent à apporter moins
d’acides gras saturés et de cholestérol,
et à être plus riches en fibres alimentaires,
magnésium et potassium, vitamines
C et E, vitamine B9, caroténoïdes
(provitamine A), flavonoïdes et
autres phytonutriments. Ces différences
nutritionnelles peuvent expliquer
en partie la meilleure santé de
ceux qui ont une alimentation végétarienne
variée et équilibrée. Néanmoins,
les végétaliens et certains végétariens
peuvent avoir des apports
plus bas en vitamine B12, calcium, vitamine
D, zinc et acides gras oméga-3
à longue chaîne.
Récemment, des cas d’intoxication
alimentaire ont été associés à la
consommation de fruits frais cultivés
localement ou importés, de graines
germées et de légumes ayant été
contaminés par des salmonelles, Escherichia
coli et d’autres micro-organismes.
Les associations de protection
de la santé demandent des inspections
et des procédures plus strictes
ainsi que l’amélioration des pratiques
de manipulation des aliments.
CONS IDÉR ATIONS NU TRITIONNE LLES
CONCERN ANT LES VÉGÉTARIENS
Les protéines
Les protéines végétales peuvent satisfaire
les besoins nutritionnels dès
lors qu’une alimentation végétale variée
est consommée et que les besoins
en énergie sont satisfaits. Les recherches
montrent qu’une variété
d’aliments végétaux mangée au cours
d’une même journée peut apporter
tous les acides aminés essentiels et
assurer une absorption et une utilisation
adéquates de l’azote chez des
adultes en bonne santé. Il n’est par
conséquent pas nécessaire de consommer
des protéines complémentaires
au cours d’un même repas (Cool.
Une méta-analyse des études portant
sur l’équilibre en azote n’a pas décelé
de différence significative dans les
besoins protéiques qui soit liée à la
source d’apport en protéines (9). En
se basant sur l’index chimique corrigé
de la digestibilité (critère standard
pour déterminer la qualité d’une protéine),
d’autres études ont montré
que, bien que l’isolat de protéine de
soja réponde aux besoins en protéines
aussi efficacement que les protéines
animales, la protéine de blé ingérée
seule, par exemple, pourrait entraîner
une utilisation moins efficace de
l’azote (10). Par conséquent, les estimations
des besoins protéiques chez
les végétaliens peuvent varier et dépendent
dans une certaine mesure de
leurs choix alimentaires. Les professionnels
de la nutrition doivent savoir
que les besoins protéiques peuvent
être quelque peu supérieurs aux
Apports Nutritionnels Conseillés2
chez les végétariens dont les sources
de protéines sont les moins bien assimilées,
comme certaines céréales et
légumineuses (11). Les céréales sont
en général pauvres en lysine, un
acide aminé essentiel (Cool. C’est un
élément à prendre en compte lorsque
l’on évalue l’alimentation de personnes
qui ne consomment pas de
protéines d’origine animale et qui ont
un apport relativement faible en
protéines. Des modifications alimentaires
comme la consommation accrue
de légumineuses et de produits à
base de soja à la place d’autres
sources de protéines moins riches en
lysine, ou encore une augmentation
de l’apport protéique global, peut permettre
un apport adéquat en lysine.
Bien que certaines femmes végétaliennes
aient des apports protéiques
proches de la limite inférieure, les apports
en protéines des ovo-lacto-végétariens
ainsi que des végétaliens
semblent en général satisfaire, voire
dépasser les besoins (12). Les sportifs
peuvent eux aussi satisfaire leurs
besoins protéiques avec une alimentation
végétale (13).
Les acides gras oméga-3
Bien que l’alimentation végétarienne
soit généralement riche en acides
gras oméga-6, elle peut être pauvre
en acides gras oméga-3. Les alimentations
qui n’incluent pas de poisson,
d’oeufs ou de grandes quantités
d’algues sont en général pauvres en
acide éicosapentaénoïque (EPA) et en
acide docosahexaénoïque (DHA), des
acides gras importants pour la bonne
santé du système cardiovasculaire
ainsi que pour le développement des
yeux et du cerveau. La conversion de
l’acide α-linolénique (ALA) – un acide
gras oméga-3 disponible dans les
végétaux – en EPA est en général
inférieure à 10 % chez les humains.
July 2009 Volume 109 Number 7 Journal of the AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION 1269
La conversion de l’ALA en DHA est
sensiblement moindre (14). Les végétariens,
et en particulier les végétaliens,
ont tendance à avoir des taux
sanguins en EPA et DHA inférieurs à
ceux relevés chez les non-végétariens
(15). Les suppléments en DHA provenant
de microalgues sont bien absorbés
et augmentent le taux sanguin de
DHA ainsi que celui de l’EPA par le
biais d’une rétroconversion (16). Du
lait de soja et des barres pour le petit
déjeuner, enrichis en DHA, sont
maintenant disponibles dans le commerce3.
Les Apports Nutritionnels
Conseillés2 établissent des apports de
1,6 et 1,1 grammes d’ALA par jour,
respectivement pour les hommes et
les femmes (17). Ces recommandations
pourraient ne pas être optimales
pour les végétariens qui
consomment peu voire pas du tout de
DHA et d’EPA (17) et qui peuvent par
conséquent nécessiter davantage
d’ALA à convertir en DHA et EPA.
Les taux de conversion pour l’ALA
tendent à s’améliorer quand les
niveaux d’acides gras oméga-6 ne
sont pas trop élevés (14). On recommande
aux végétariens d’incorporer
dans leur alimentation de bonnes
sources d’ALA, comme des graines de
lin, des noix, de l’huile de colza et du
soja. Ceux qui ont des besoins accrus
en acides gras oméga-3 (par exemple
les femmes enceintes ou allaitantes)
pourraient tirer profit des microalgues
riches en DHA (18).
Le fer
Le fer contenu dans les végétaux est
du fer non héminique, ce qui le rend
sensible aux inhibiteurs ainsi qu’aux
facilitateurs de l’absorption du fer.
Parmi les inhibiteurs de l’absorption
du fer se trouvent les phytates, le calcium
et les polyphénols présents
dans le thé, le café, les tisanes et le
cacao. Les fibres ne diminuent que
légèrement l’absorption du fer (19).
Certains types de préparation des
aliments tels que le trempage et
la germination des légumineuses,
céréales et graines ainsi que l’utilisation
de levain pour le pain peuvent
diminuer les taux de phytates (20) et
augmenter par conséquent l’absorption
du fer (21,22). D’autres procédés
de fermentation, comme ceux utilisés
pour fabriquer le miso et le tempeh,
pourraient aussi améliorer la biodisponibilité
du fer (23). La vitamine C
et les autres acides organiques présents
dans les fruits et légumes peuvent
favoriser de manière notable
l’absorption du fer et réduire les effets
inhibiteurs des phytates, augmentant
par conséquent le taux de
fer (24,25). Du fait de la moindre biodisponibilité
du fer non héminique
contenu dans une alimentation végétarienne,
les apports conseillés en fer
pour les végétariens sont 1,8 fois ceux
conseillés pour les non-végétariens
(26). Bien que plusieurs études sur
l’absorption du fer aient été réalisées
sur de courtes périodes, la preuve est
faite que l’organisme s’adapte sur le
long terme à de faibles apports en fer,
en mettant en jeu à la fois une
meilleure absorption du fer et une réduction
des pertes (27,28). L’incidence
de l’anémie par carence martiale
parmi les végétariens est
identique à celle prévalant chez les
non-végétariens (12,29). Bien que
les adultes végétariens aient des
réserves en fer plus faibles que les
non-végétariens, leur taux de ferritine
dans le sang est habituellement
dans les normes (29,30).
Le zinc
La biodisponibilité du zinc dans les
alimentations végétariennes est inférieure
à celle des alimentations non
végétariennes, principalement à
cause du taux plus élevé d’acide phytique
dans les alimentations végétariennes
(31). Par conséquent, les besoins
en zinc chez les végétariens
dont l’alimentation comprend principalement
des céréales non raffinées
et des légumineuses riches en phytates
peuvent être supérieurs aux
Apports Nutritionnels Conseillés2
(26). Les apports en zinc chez les
végétariens varient selon les études,
certaines montrant des apports
proches des recommandations (32),
d’autres affichant des apports sensiblement
inférieurs aux recommandations
(29,33). Une carence manifeste
en zinc est difficile à mettre en évidence
chez les végétariens des pays
occidentaux. La difficulté d’évaluer
les taux de zinc qui se trouvent
proches de la limite inférieure ne permet
pas de déterminer les effets possibles
d’une faible absorption de zinc
provenant d’une alimentation végétarienne
(31). Parmi les sources de
zinc se trouvent les produits à base
de soja, les légumineuses, les
céréales, le fromage et les fruits à
coque. Certains types de préparation
des aliments tels que le trempage et
la germination des légumineuses,
céréales et graines ainsi que l’utilisation
de levain pour le pain peuvent
réduire la rétention du zinc par les
phytates et ainsi accroître sa biodisponibilité
(34). Les acides organiques,
tel l’acide citrique, peuvent aussi,
dans une certaine mesure, faciliter
l’absorption du zinc (34).
L’iode
Certaines études semblent indiquer
que les végétaliens qui ne consomment
pas certaines sources riches en
iode comme le sel iodé ou les plantes
marines pourraient risquer une
carence du fait de la pauvreté en iode
des alimentations végétales (12,35).
Le sel de mer, le sel casher ainsi que
les assaisonnements salés comme le
tamari ne sont généralement pas iodés.
L’apport en iode des plantes marines
doit être contrôlé car il varie
beaucoup d’une source à l’autre, certaines
contenant de grandes quantités
d’iode (36). Les aliments comme
les graines de soja, les légumes crucifères
et les patates douces contiennent
des goitrogènes naturels. Toutefois,
ces aliments n’ont pas été
associés à des insuffisances thyroïdiennes
chez des personnes en bonne
santé dont les apports en iode sont
suffisants (37).
Le calcium
Les apports en calcium chez les ovolacto-
végétariens sont comparables
ou supérieurs à ceux des non-végétariens
(12) tandis que les apports chez
les végétaliens sont inférieurs à ceux
de ces deux groupes et peuvent être
inférieurs aux apports conseillés (12).
La composante Oxford de l’étude
EPIC-Oxford (étude prospective européenne
sur la nutrition et le cancer) a
montré que le risque de fracture
osseuse était semblable chez les ovolacto-
végétariens et les omnivores,
alors que ce risque était supérieur de
30 % chez les végétaliens, peut-être à
cause de leur apport moyen en calcium
nettement moindre (38). Les
alimentations riches en viande, poissons,
produits laitiers, fruits à coque
et céréales produisent une forte
1270 Journal of the AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION July 2009 Volume 109 Number 7
charge acide pour les reins, principalement
à cause des résidus en sulfate
et phosphate. La résorption du calcium
des os aide à tamponner
une partie de cette charge acide
et entraîne une augmentation des
pertes de calcium dans les urines.
Des apports élevés en sel peuvent
aussi engendrer de telles pertes. D’un
autre côté, les fruits et légumes riches
en potassium et magnésium produisent
une forte charge alcaline pour
les reins, qui freine la résorption du
calcium osseux et diminue les pertes
de calcium dans les urines. De plus,
certaines études ont montré que le
ratio apports en calcium/apports en
protéines est un meilleur facteur prédictif
de santé osseuse que les seuls
apports en calcium. Ce ratio est habituellement
élevé chez les ovo-lactovégétariens
et favorise une bonne
santé osseuse, alors que chez les végétaliens
le ratio calcium/protéines
est proche ou inférieur à celui relevé
chez les non-végétariens (39). De
nombreux végétaliens peuvent trouver
plus facile de satisfaire leurs
besoins en calcium en consommant
des aliments enrichis en calcium ou
des suppléments alimentaires (39).
Les légumes verts pauvres en oxalates
(par exemple le chou Bok Choy,
le brocoli, le chou chinois, le chou vert
et le chou frisé) ainsi que les jus de
fruits enrichis en citrate-malate de
calcium sont des sources de calcium
très assimilables (biodisponibilité
entre 50 % et 60 % pour les premiers
et entre 40 % et 50 % pour les seconds)
alors que le calcium du tofu et du lait
de vache a une bonne biodisponibilité
(comprise entre 30 % et 35 %) ; les
graines de sésame, amandes et haricots
secs ont une biodisponibilité plus
faible (de 21 % à 27 %) (39). La biodisponibilité
du calcium contenu dans
les laits de soja enrichis en carbonate
de calcium est équivalente à celle du
lait de vache, bien que quelques données
aient montré que cette biodisponibilité
est nettement moindre dans
le cas où du triphosphate de calcium
est utilisé pour enrichir les boissons
au soja (40). Les aliments enrichis en
calcium comme les jus de fruits, les
laits de soja et de riz et les céréales
du petit déjeuner peuvent fortement
augmenter les apports en calcium
chez les végétaliens (41). Les oxalates
présents dans certains aliments
comme les épinards et les blettes
réduisent beaucoup l’absorption du
calcium, faisant ainsi de ces végétaux
des sources pauvres en calcium
assimilable. Les aliments riches en
phytates peuvent aussi inhiber l’absorption
du calcium.
La vitamine D
La vitamine D est connue depuis
longtemps pour son rôle important
dans la santé des os. Le taux de vitamine
D dépend à la fois de l’exposition
au soleil et de l’apport alimentaire
en vitamine D provenant
d’aliments enrichis ou de suppléments.
La production de vitamine D
par la peau suite à une exposition au
soleil est très variable et dépend de
plusieurs facteurs parmi lesquels le
moment de la journée, la saison, la
latitude, la pigmentation de la peau,
l’usage de crèmes solaires et l’âge. De
faibles apports en vitamine D (42), de
faibles taux sanguins de 25-hydroxyvitamine
D (12) ainsi que de faibles
densités osseuses (43) ont été observés
chez des groupes végétaliens et
macrobiotiques qui n’utilisaient ni
aliments enrichis ni suppléments.
Parmi les aliments enrichis en vitamine
D se trouvent le lait de vache,
certains laits de soja ou laits de riz,
des jus d’orange, des céréales du petit
déjeuner ainsi que des margarines4.
Vitamine D2 et vitamine D3 sont
toutes deux utilisées dans les suppléments
ou pour enrichir les aliments.
La vitamine D3 (cholécalciférol),
d’origine animale, est obtenue par
irradiation d’ultraviolets sur du
7-déshydrocholestérol extrait de la
lanoline. La vitamine D2 (ergocalciférol),
produite par irradiation d’ultraviolets
sur de l’ergosterol extrait de
levure, convient aux végétaliens. Bien
que certaines études laissent penser
que la vitamine D2 est moins efficace
que la vitamine D3 pour maintenir
un taux sanguin normal de 25-hydroxyvitamine
D (44), d’autres études,
au contraire, ont constaté que l’efficacité
des 2 vitamines est identique
(45). Si l’exposition au soleil et
l’apport en aliments enrichis sont
insuffisants, il est recommandé de se
supplémenter en vitamine D.
La vitamine B-12
Les taux de vitamine B12 sont insuffisants
chez certains végétariens du
fait d’une consommation irrégulière
de sources fiables de cette vitamine
(12,46,47). Les ovo-lacto-végétariens
peuvent obtenir des apports suffisants
en vitamine B12 grâce aux produits
laitiers, aux oeufs ou à d’autres
sources fiables (aliments enrichis ou
suppléments) s’ils sont consommés
régulièrement. Chez les végétaliens,
la vitamine B12 doit être apportée
par une consommation régulière
d’aliments enrichis en vitamine B12,
comme les boissons au soja ou au riz,
certaines céréales du petit déjeuner,
certains produits simili-carnés, ou
encore la levure nutritionnelle Red
Star Vegetarian Support Formula, ou
sinon par un supplément quotidien
de vitamine B125. Aucune source
végétale non enrichie ne contient de
vitamine B12 active en quantité
significative. Les produits fermentés
à base de soja ne peuvent être considérés
comme des sources fiables de
vitamine B12 active (12,46). Les alimentations
végétariennes sont habituellement
riches en acide folique
(vitamine B9) ce qui peut masquer les
symptômes hématologiques d’une
carence en vitamine B12. Ainsi, certains
cas de carence peuvent ne pas
être détectés jusqu’à l’apparition de
symptômes ou signes neurologiques
(47). La meilleure façon d’analyser le
statut en vitamine B12 passe par
l’analyse du taux sanguin d’homocystéine,
d’acide méthylmalonique ou de
transcobalamine II (48).
LE VÉGÉTARISME SE LON LES PÉR IODES
DE LA VIE
Les alimentations végétalienne, lactovégétarienne
et ovo-lacto-végétarienne
bien conçues sont appropriées
à tous les stades de la vie, y compris
la grossesse et l’allaitement. Conçues
de façon appropriée, elles satisfont les
besoins nutritionnels des bébés, des
enfants, des adolescents et contribuent
à une croissance normale (49-
51). La figure 1 fournit des conseils
spécifiques d’organisation des repas
pour les alimentations végétariennes.
Les adultes végétariens depuis leur
naissance ont une taille, un poids et
un indice de masse corporelle (IMC)
comparables à ceux des adultes devenus
végétariens à un âge plus tardif,
ce qui suggère qu’une alimentation
végétarienne bien planifiée au cours
July 2009 Volume 109 Number 7 Journal of the AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION 1271
de la petite enfance et de l’enfance n’a
pas d’incidence sur la taille et le poids
finals à l’âge adulte (53). Le végétarisme
chez les jeunes enfants et les
adolescents peut aider à la mise en
place de comportements alimentaires
bons pour la santé pour toute la vie et
présenter d’importants avantages
nutritionnels. Les enfants et les adolescents
végétariens ont des apports
moins élevés en cholestérol, graisses
saturées et lipides en général et des
apports plus importants en fruits, légumes
et fibres que les non-végétariens
(54-55). Les enfants végétariens
sont aussi, selon les études, plus
sveltes et ont des niveaux de cholestérol
sérique plus faibles (50-56).
Les femmes enceintes et allaitantes
Les besoins nutritionnels et énergétiques
des femmes enceintes et
allaitantes végétariennes ne diffèrent
pas de ceux des femmes non
végétariennes, excepté les apports
conseillés en fer qui sont plus élevés
pour les femmes végétariennes. Une
alimentation végétarienne peut être
conçue de façon à couvrir les besoins
nutritionnels des femmes enceintes
et allaitantes. Une revue de la littérature
fondée sur des preuves a été
réalisée afin d’évaluer l’état de la recherche
au sujet des grossesses
végétariennes (57). Sept questions
ont été définies pour une analyse
fondée sur des preuves :
Conseils pour l’organisation de repas végétariens
Diverses approches dans l’organisation des menus peuvent fournir les
nutriments adéquats aux végétariens. Les ANC (Apports Nutritionnels
Conseillés) sont une référence de choix pour les professionnels de la diététique
et de la nutrition. Plusieurs guides alimentaires (41,52) peuvent
être utilisés pour la prise en charge nutritionnelle des patients végétariens.
En complément, les règles suivantes peuvent aider les végétariens
à concevoir une alimentation bonne pour la santé :
• Choisir une variété d’aliments comprenant des céréales complètes, des
légumes, des fruits, des légumineuses, des fruits à coque, des graines
et, si souhaité, des produits laitiers et des oeufs.
• Minimiser les apports en aliments très sucrés, très salés et très gras,
et particulièrement en acides gras saturés et en acides gras trans.
• Choisir une grande variété de fruits et légumes.
• Si des produits animaux comme les produits laitiers et les oeufs sont
consommés, choisir des produits laitiers peu gras ou allégés en graisses
et consommer oeufs et produits laitiers avec modération.
• S’assurer d’avoir une source régulière de vitamine B12 et, si l’exposition
au soleil est limitée, une source de vitamine D.
• Quelles sont les différences
d’apports en macronutriments et
en calories entre les femmes enceintes
ovo-lacto-végétariennes et
les femmes enceintes omnivores ?
• L’état de santé des nouveau-nés
diffère-t-il selon que les mères ont
une alimentation ovo-lacto-végétarienne
ou omnivore pendant leur
grossesse ?
• Quelles sont les différences d’apports
en macronutriments et en
calories entre les femmes enceintes
végétaliennes et les femmes enceintes
omnivores ?
• L’état de santé des nouveau-nés
diffère-t-il selon que les mères ont
une alimentation végétalienne ou
omnivore pendant leur grossesse ?
• Quels sont les apports moyens
en micronutriments des femmes
enceintes végétariennes ?
• Quelle est la biodisponibilité des
différents micronutriments chez les
femmes enceintes végétariennes ?
• Existe-t-il une corrélation entre
l’état de santé des nouveau-nés et
la quantité de micronutriments
apportée par l’alimentation végétarienne
maternelle ?
Les résultats complets de cette analyse
fondée sur des preuves sont
consultables sur le site Internet de
l’EAL (www.adaevidencelibrary.com)
et sont résumés ci-dessous.
Apports en macronutriments et en
énergie. Quatre études issues d’articles
originaux examinant les apports
en macronutriments des femmes
enceintes ovo-lacto-végétariennes et
lacto-végétariennes ont été répertoriées
(58-61). Aucune ne traitait des
femmes enceintes végétaliennes.
Conclusion officielle de l’EAL : Un
faible nombre de recherches effectuées
sur des populations non américaines
montre que les apports en macronutriments
des femmes enceintes
végétariennes sont comparables à
ceux des non-végétariennes avec les
exceptions suivantes :
• les femmes enceintes végétariennes
ont statistiquement des apports
plus faibles en protéines (en pourcentage
de l’apport énergétique
total) que les non-végétariennes ; et
• les femmes enceintes végétariennes
ont statistiquement des apports
plus élevés en glucides (en pourcentage
de l’apport énergétique total)
que les non-végétariennes.
Toutefois, il importe de noter qu’aucune
étude ne fait apparaître de différences
significatives d’un point de
vue clinique dans les apports en macronutriments.
Autrement dit, aucune
étude ne fait apparaître une
déficience en protéines chez les
femmes enceintes végétariennes. Niveau
III = Limité.
Conclusion officielle de l’EAL :
Aucune étude traitant des apports
en macronutriments des femmes
enceintes végétaliennes n’a été identifiée.
Niveau V = Non évaluable.
État de santé des nouveau-nés.
Quatre études de cohorte examinant
la relation entre les apports en macronutriments
pendant la grossesse
et les indicateurs de l’état de santé
des nouveau-nés comme la taille et
le poids à la naissance ont été répertoriées
(59-62). Aucune ne traitait
des femmes enceintes végétaliennes.
Conclusion officielle de l’EAL : Un
faible nombre de recherches effectuées
sur des populations non américaines
indique qu’il n’y a pas de
différences significatives entre l’état
de santé des bébés nés de mères végétariennes
non végétaliennes et
ceux nés de mères non végétariennes.
Niveau III = Limité
Figure 1

2
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
saveallGOD'sAnimals
Admin


Masculin Nombre de messages : 19955
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme   Ven 14 Jan - 6:45

1272 Journal of the AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION July 2009 Volume 109 Number 7
Conclusion officielle de l’EAL :
Aucune étude comparant l’état de
santé des bébés nés de mères végétaliennes
et ceux nés de mères omnivores
n’a été répertoriée. Niveau V =
Non évaluable
Apports en micronutriments. Sur
la base de 10 études (58-60, 63-69),
dont deux ont été menées aux États-
Unis (64-65), seuls les micronutriments
suivants étaient apportés en
plus faibles quantités chez les végétariens
que chez les omnivores :
• vitamine B12 ;
• vitamine C ;
• calcium ;
• zinc.
Les végétariens étaient en-dessous
des normes (dans au moins un pays)
pour :
• la vitamine B12 (au Royaume-Uni) ;
• le fer (aux États-Unis, à la fois chez
les végétariens et chez les omnivores)
;
• la vitamine B9 (en Allemagne,
quoique la déficience soit moins
importante chez les végétariens
que chez les omnivores) ;
• le zinc (au Royaume-Uni).
Conclusion officielle de l’EAL :
Niveau III = Limité
Biodisponibilité des micronutriments.
Six études (cinq non américaines
et une associant des sujets
américains et non américains ; toutes
de bonne qualité sauf une) examinant
la biodisponibilité de divers
micronutriments chez des femmes
enceintes végétariennes et non
végétariennes ont été répertoriées
(58,63,64,66,67,69). Sur l’ensemble
des micronutriments observés, seuls
les taux de vitamine B12 sérique
étaient significativement plus bas
chez les végétariennes non végétaliennes
que chez les non-végétariennes.
En outre, une étude a montré
que des taux faibles de vitamine
B12 avaient davantage tendance à
être associés à une homocystéine
plasmatique totale élevée chez les
ovo-lacto-végétariennes que chez les
femmes omnivores ou consommant
peu de viande. Bien que les taux de
zinc ne soient pas significativement
différents entre les végétariennes
non végétaliennes et les non-végétariennes,
les végétariennes ayant des
apports élevés en calcium courent le
risque d’une carence en zinc (à cause
des interactions entre les phytates, le
calcium et le zinc). D’après des
preuves limitées, le taux de vitamine
B9 plasmatique pourrait en fait être
plus élevé chez certains groupes de
végétariens que chez les omnivores.
Conclusion officielle de l’EAL : Niveau
III = Limité
Conclusion officielle de l’EAL sur
les micronutriments et l’état de
santé des nouveau-nés : Sept études
(toutes réalisées en dehors des États-
Unis) ont montré (preuves limitées)
que la teneur en micronutriments
apportée par une alimentation végétarienne
maternelle équilibrée n’avait
pas d’effets néfastes sur la santé de
l’enfant à la naissance (58-63,69). Il
pourrait toutefois y avoir un risque de
diagnostic faussement positif de trisomie
21 sur le foetus lorsque les taux
sériques maternels de ß-hcg et d’alpha-
foetoprotéine sont utilisés comme
marqueurs chez les mères végétariennes.
Niveau III = Limité
Considérations nutritionnelles.
Les résultats de l’analyse fondée sur
des preuves suggèrent que les alimentations
végétariennes pendant la
grossesse peuvent être adéquates sur
le plan nutritionnel et aboutir à des
résultats positifs sur la santé des nouveau-
nés (57). Les nutriments clés
pendant la grossesse sont la vitamine
B12, la vitamine D, le fer et la vitamine
B9, tandis que les nutriments
clés pendant la lactation sont la vitamine
B12, la vitamine D, le calcium et
le zinc. L’alimentation des mères végétariennes
enceintes et allaitantes
doit comprendre quotidiennement
des sources fiables de vitamine B12.
D’après les recommandations concernant
la grossesse et l’allaitement, s’il
existe une inquiétude quant à la synthèse
de la vitamine D en raison d’une
exposition limitée au soleil, de la couleur
de la peau, de la saison ou de
l’usage d’une crème solaire, les
femmes enceintes et allaitantes doivent
utiliser des suppléments de vitamine
D ou des aliments enrichis en
cette vitamine. Aucune étude mentionnée
dans l’analyse par les preuves
ne traitait du statut en vitamine D
des femmes enceintes végétariennes.
Des suppléments en fer peuvent être
nécessaires pour prévenir ou traiter
des anémies ferriprives, qui sont courantes
durant la grossesse. Il est
conseillé aux femmes désirant ou susceptibles
d’être enceintes de consommer
400 μg de vitamine B9 quotidiennement
à partir de suppléments ou
d’aliments enrichis (ou les deux). Les
besoins en zinc et en calcium peuvent
être couverts par l’alimentation ou
avec des suppléments, comme cela a
été évoqué plus haut. Les omégas-3 à
longue chaîne DHA sont également
importants pour la grossesse et l’allaitement.
Les bébés de mères végétariennes
semblent avoir des taux de
DHA dans le plasma et dans le cordon
ombilical plus faibles que les bébés de
mères non végétariennes (70). La teneur
en DHA du lait maternel des
végétaliennes et ovo-lacto-végétariennes
est inférieure à celle des nonvégétariennes
(71). Les acides gras
DHA ayant des effets bénéfiques sur
la durée de la gestation, le développement
neurologique et les fonctions visuelles
du bébé, les femmes enceintes
ou allaitantes végétaliennes ou végétariennes
devraient opter pour des
sources alimentaires de DHA (aliments
fortifiés ou oeufs de poules
nourries avec une microalgue riche en
DHA) ou prendre des suppléments de
DHA provenant de cette microalgue
(72,73). La supplémentation en ALA,
précurseur du DHA, n’apparaît pas
efficace pour augmenter les taux de
DHA des nourrissons ou la concentration
en DHA du lait maternel
(74,75).
Les nourrissons
Les nourrissons végétariens alimentés
en quantité adéquate au lait maternel
ou avec une formule commerciale
de lait pour nourrissons ont une
croissance normale. L’apport de
sources satisfaisantes d’énergie et de
nutriments permettra d’assurer une
croissance normale au moment de
l’introduction d’aliments solides.
L’absence de danger de certains
régimes extrêmement restrictifs
comme le fruitarisme ou le crudivorisme
n’a pas été étudiée chez les enfants.
Ces alimentations peuvent être
très pauvres en apports énergétiques,
protéiques, en certaines vitamines et
minéraux et ne sauraient donc être
recommandées pour les nourrissons
July 2009 Volume 109 Number 7 Journal of the AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION 1273
et les enfants. L’allaitement est fréquent
chez les femmes végétariennes,
et cette pratique doit être encouragée.
La composition du lait des
femmes végétariennes est identique
à celle du lait des femmes non végétariennes
et est nutritionnellement
adéquate. Des préparations pour
nourrissons doivent être utilisées si
les nourrissons ne sont pas nourris
au sein ou sont sevrés avant l’âge
d’un an. Les préparations pour nourrissons
à base de soja sont la seule
option pour les nourrissons végétaliens
qui ne sont pas allaités. Les
autres préparations comme le lait de
soja, le lait de riz ou les formules
« maison » ne doivent pas être utilisées
à la place du lait maternel ou des
préparations du commerce pour
nourrissons. Il convient d’effectuer
l’introduction des aliments solides au
même rythme que pour les enfants
non végétariens, en remplaçant la
viande hachée par du tofu écrasé ou
mixé, des légumineuses (mixées ou
hachées si nécessaire), du yaourt au
soja ou au lait de vache, du jaune
d’oeuf cuit ou du fromage blanc. Plus
tard, vers 7 à 10 mois, on peut introduire
du tofu, du fromage ou du fromage
de soja en dés ainsi que des petits
morceaux de steaks végétaux. Si
la croissance de l’enfant est normale
et qu’il mange des aliments variés, il
est possible de commencer à utiliser
du lait de soja du commerce riche en
graisses et enrichi ou du lait de vache
pasteurisé comme boisson principale
à partir de l’âge de un an ou plus (51).
Les aliments caloriques riches en nutriments
comme les purées de légumineuses,
d’avocat et de tofu sont recommandés
au moment du sevrage.
Les apports en graisses ne doivent
pas être limités en quantité chez les
enfants de moins de deux ans.
Les lignes de conduite à suivre pour
la supplémentation alimentaire sont
généralement les mêmes que pour les
nourrissons non végétariens. Les
nourrissons nourris au lait maternel
et dont la mère n’a pas d’apport adéquat
en vitamine B12 doivent recevoir
un supplément de vitamine B12
(51). Les apports en zinc doivent être
évalués et des suppléments en zinc
ou des aliments enrichis en zinc doivent
être consommés au moment de
la diversification alimentaire si l’alimentation
est pauvre en zinc ou
constituée principalement d’aliments
à faible biodisponibilité en zinc (76).
Les enfants
Les enfants ovo-lacto-végétariens ont
une croissance similaire à celle de
leurs semblables non végétariens
(50). Peu de données sont disponibles
concernant la croissance des enfants
végétaliens non macrobiotes. Certaines
études suggèrent que les enfants
végétaliens ont tendance à être
légèrement plus petits tout en restant
dans les fourchettes standard de
poids et de taille (58). Des troubles de
croissance ont été constatés principalement
chez des enfants qui suivaient
une alimentation très restrictive (77).
Des repas et goûters fréquents et
l’usage de certains aliments raffinés
(comme les céréales enrichies pour
petit déjeuner, le pain et les pâtes) et
d’aliments riches en graisses insaturées
peuvent aider les enfants végétariens
à couvrir leurs besoins en énergie
et nutriments. En moyenne, les
apports en protéines chez les enfants
végétariens (ovo-lacto, végétalien et
macrobiote) couvrent ou dépassent
généralement les recommandations
(12). Les enfants végétaliens peuvent
avoir des besoins en protéines légèrement
plus élevés du fait des différences
de digestibilité et de composition
en acides aminés des protéines
(49,78), mais ces besoins en protéines
sont généralement couverts quand
l’alimentation apporte suffisamment
de calories et provient d’aliments végétaux
variés.
Des guides alimentaires destinés aux
enfants végétariens ont par ailleurs
été publiés (12).
Les adolescents
La croissance des adolescents ovolacto-
végétariens est comparable à
celle des non végétariens (50). De
précédentes études ont établi que les
filles végétariennes avaient leurs
premières règles un peu plus tard
que les non végétariennes (79) ; des
études plus récentes n’ont pas observé
de différence au niveau de l’âge
des premières règles (53,80).
Le végétarisme semble offrir nombre
d’avantages nutritionnels pour les
adolescents. Il a été constaté que les
adolescents végétariens consomment
davantage de fibres, fer, vitamine B9,
vitamine A et vitamine C que les non
végétariens (54,81). Les adolescents
végétariens consomment également
plus de fruits et légumes et moins de
sucreries, d’aliments de fast-food et
d’encas salés que les adolescents non
végétariens (54,55). Les nutriments
clés pour les adolescents végétariens
comprennent le calcium, la vitamine
D, le fer, le zinc et la vitamine B12.
Être végétarien ne conduit pas à des
troubles du comportement alimentaire
comme certains l’ont suggéré ;
cependant le végétarisme pourrait
être choisi pour dissimuler un trouble
du comportement alimentaire existant
(82). De ce fait, le végétarisme
est légèrement plus commun chez les
adolescents présentant un trouble du
comportement alimentaire que chez
les adolescents en général (83).
Les professionnels de la nutrition
devraient prêter attention à ceux de
leurs jeunes patients qui restreignent
fortement leurs choix alimentaires
et qui présentent des symptômes
de troubles du comportement
alimentaire.
Assortie de conseils pour l’organisation
des repas, l’alimentation végétarienne
est un choix satisfaisant et
bénéfique pour la santé des adolescents.
Les personnes âgées
Avec l’âge, les besoins énergétiques
diminuent, mais les recommandations
pour quelques nutriments, comprenant
le calcium, la vitamine D et
la vitamine B6, sont plus élevées. Les
apports en micronutriments et particulièrement
en calcium, zinc, fer et
vitamine B12 sont diminués chez les
personnes âgées (84). Les études
montrent que les végétariens âgés
ont des apports nutritionnels comparables
à ceux des non-végétariens
(85,86).
Les personnes âgées peuvent avoir
des difficultés pour absorber la vitamine
B12 à partir des aliments, souvent
à cause de gastrites atrophiques.
Par conséquent, des aliments enrichis
en vitamine B12 ou des suppléments,
qui permettent généralement
une bonne assimilation de cette
vitamine, sont recommandés (87).
La production cutanée de vitamine D
décroît avec l’âge. L’apport de
vitamine D par l’alimentation ou à
partir de suppléments est donc
particulièrement important (88). Les
1274 Journal of the AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION July 2009 Volume 109 Number 7
recommandations actuelles en protéines
pour les personnes âgées en
bonne santé sont identiques à celles
des autres adultes en fonction du
poids (17), bien que ce sujet soit
controversé (89). Les personnes âgées
ayant des besoins énergétiques
faibles auront sans doute besoin
d’aliments concentrés en protéines.
Les personnes âgées peuvent satisfaire
leurs besoins en protéines dans
le cadre d’une alimentation végétarienne
si des aliments variés, riches
en protéines, incluant des légumineuses
et des produits à base de soja,
sont consommés quotidiennement.
Les sportifs
L’alimentation végétarienne peut
également répondre aux besoins des
athlètes de compétition. Les recommandations
nutritionnelles à suivre
pour les sportifs végétariens doivent
être formulées en prenant en compte
les conséquences à la fois du végétarisme
et de l’entraînement. La position
de l’Association américaine de
diététique et des diététiciens canadiens
sur l’alimentation et les performances
sportives donne davantage
d’informations spécifiques concernant
les sportifs végétariens (90). Des
recherches sont nécessaires pour étudier
le lien entre végétarisme et performances
sportives. Une alimentation
végétarienne conforme aux
besoins énergétiques et comprenant
une variété de sources végétales de
protéines, comme des produits à base
de soja, d’autres légumineuses, des
céréales, des fruits à coque et des
graines, est susceptible de fournir
suffisamment de protéines et ne nécessite
pas de recourir à des aliments
spéciaux ou à des suppléments (91).
Les sportifs végétariens peuvent
avoir une concentration de créatine
musculaire plus faible due à des apports
alimentaires réduits en créatine
(92,93). Les sportifs végétariens
réalisant des efforts physiques brefs
et intenses et des efforts d’endurance
pourraient avoir intérêt à prendre
des suppléments de créatine (91).
Certaines études, mais pas toutes,
suggèrent que l’aménorrhée peut se
rencontrer davantage chez les sportives
végétariennes que non végétariennes
(94,95). Les sportives végétariennes
pourraient tirer profit d’une
alimentation comprenant un niveau
énergétique suffisant, des apports
plus élevés en graisse et de grandes
quantités de calcium et de fer.
LES ALIMEN TATIONS VÉGÉTARIENNES
ET LES MALADIES CHRONIQUES
Maladies cardiovasculaires
L’analyse fondée sur les niveaux de
preuves de la littérature médicale sert
à évaluer les recherches existantes
sur la relation entre les alimentations
végétariennes et les facteurs de risque
de maladies cardiovasculaires (96).
Deux questions se fondant sur l’analyse
des preuves ont été posées :
• Quelle est la relation entre une
alimentation végétarienne et les
cardiopathies ischémiques ?
• Comment l’apport en micronutriments
d’une alimentation végétarienne
est-il associé aux facteurs de
risque de maladies cardiovasculaires
?
Cardiopathies ischémiques. Deux
grandes études de cohorte (97,98) et
une méta-analyse (99) ont conclu que
les végétariens avaient un risque de
décès par cardiopathie ischémique inférieur
à celui des non-végétariens. Ce
risque plus faible de décès a été
constaté tant chez les ovo-lacto-végétariens
que chez les végétaliens (99).
Cette différence persistait après ajustement
pour l’indice de masse corporel
(IMC), la consommation de tabac et la
catégorie sociale (97). Ceci est particulièrement
significatif parce que l’IMC
généralement plus bas des végétariens
est un facteur pouvant expliquer
leur plus faible risque de maladies
cardiovasculaires. Si cette différence
de risque persiste même après ajustement
pour l’IMC, d’autres aspects
de l’alimentation végétarienne pourraient
être la cause de la diminution
de ce risque, bien au-delà de la différence
à laquelle on pourrait s’attendre
du fait d’un IMC plus bas. Conclusion
officielle de l’EAL : Une alimentation
végétarienne est associée à un
moindre risque de décès par cardiopathie
ischémique. Niveau I = Bon.
Taux de lipides sanguins. Le risque
inférieur de décès par cardiopathie
ischémique observé chez les végétariens
pourrait s’expliquer en partie
par des taux de lipides sanguins différents.
Une grande étude de cohorte
a permis d’estimer, en fonction des
taux de lipides sanguins, que l’incidence
des cardiopathies ischémiques
était inférieure de 24 % chez les végétariens
de longue date et de 57 % chez
les végétaliens de longue date, en
comparaison avec les non-végétariens
(97). Il est typique que les
études fassent apparaître des taux de
cholestérol total et de cholestérol
LDL plus faibles chez les végétariens
(100, par exemple). Des études d’intervention
ont montré une diminution
des taux de cholestérol total et de
cholestérol LDL lorsque les sujets
passaient de leur alimentation habituelle
à une alimentation végétarienne
(101, par exemple). Alors que
les preuves sont limitées pour associer
l’alimentation végétarienne à des
taux de cholestérol HDL plus élevés
ou à des taux de triglycérides plus élevés
ou plus bas, l’alimentation végétarienne
est systématiquement associée
à des taux de cholestérol LDL plus
bas. D’autres facteurs comme les différences
d’IMC ainsi que les aliments
consommés ou évités dans le contexte
d’une alimentation végétarienne ou
bien les différences de mode de vie
pourraient en partie expliquer l’incohérence
des résultats concernant les
taux de lipides sanguins.
Dans une alimentation végétarienne,
les facteurs qui pourraient avoir un
effet bénéfique sur les taux de lipides
sanguins sont : de plus grandes quantités
de fibres, fruits à coque, soja, stérols
végétaux et des apports plus
faibles en acides gras saturés. Les végétariens
consomment entre 50 % et
100 % plus de fibres que les non-végétariens
et les végétaliens ont des
apports plus élevés que les ovo-lactovégétariens
(12). Il a été démontré à
plusieurs reprises que les fibres
solubles font baisser les taux de cholestérol
total et de cholestérol LDL, et
réduisent le risque de maladie coronarienne
(17). Une alimentation
riche en fruits à coque fait baisser de
façon significative les niveaux de
cholestérol total et de cholestérol
LDL (102). Les isoflavones du soja
pourraient jouer un rôle en réduisant
les niveaux de cholestérol LDL et en
réduisant la sensibilité du cholestérol
LDL à l’oxydation (103). Les stérols
végétaux, que l’on trouve dans les
légumineuses, les fruits à coque et
July 2009 Volume 109 Number 7 Journal of the AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION 1275
les graines, les céréales complètes, les
huiles végétales et d’autres aliments
végétaux réduisent l’absorption du
cholestérol et font baisser le taux de
cholestérol LDL (104).
Facteurs associés aux alimentations
végétariennes pouvant affecter le
risque de maladies cardiovasculaires.
Les alimentations végétariennes,
indépendamment de leur
effet sur les taux de cholestérol, présentent
d’autres facteurs pouvant
avoir un impact sur le risque de maladies
cardiovasculaires. Les aliments
qui prédominent dans une alimentation
végétarienne et qui peuvent
offrir une protection contre les
maladies cardiovasculaires sont les
protéines de soja (105), les fruits et
les légumes, les céréales complètes et
les fruits à coque (106,107). Les végétariens
semblent consommer plus de
phytonutriments que les non-végétariens
parce qu’un plus grand pourcentage
de leurs apports énergétiques
provient d’aliments végétaux.
Les flavonoïdes et d’autres phytonutriments
semblent avoir des effets
protecteurs en tant qu’antioxydants,
en réduisant l’agrégation plaquettaire
et la coagulation sanguine, en
tant qu’agents anti-inflammatoires,
et en améliorant la fonction endothéliale
(108,109). Il a été démontré que
les ovo-lacto-végétariens avaient de
bien meilleures réponses vasodilatatrices,
ce qui suggère que les alimentations
végétariennes ont un effet
bénéfique sur la fonction endothéliale
vasculaire (110).
Une analyse des preuves a été réalisée
afin d’examiner comment la
composition en micronutriments des
alimentations végétariennes pourrait
être liée aux facteurs de risque
de maladies cardiovasculaires.
Conclusion officielle de l’EAL :
Aucune recherche satisfaisant aux
critères d’inclusion et évaluant
l’éventuelle relation entre les apports
en micronutriments spécifiques d’une
alimentation végétarienne et les facteurs
de risque de maladies cardiovasculaires,
n’a été trouvée.
Niveau V = non évaluable.
Tous les aspects des alimentations
végétariennes ne sont pas associés
à un risque réduit de maladie
cardiaque. Les taux plus élevés d’homocystéine
sérique trouvés chez certains
végétariens, apparemment en
raison d’un apport inadéquat en vitamine
B12, pourraient augmenter le
risque de maladies cardiovasculaires
(111,112), même si toutes les études
n’appuient pas cette conclusion (113).
Les alimentations végétariennes ont
été utilisées avec succès dans le traitement
des maladies cardiovasculaires.
Il a été démontré qu’une alimentation
pauvre en graisses (≤ 10 %
des apports énergétiques), proche du
végétalisme (des quantités limitées
de produits laitiers écrémés et de
blanc d’oeuf étant autorisées), associée
à de l’exercice physique, à l’arrêt
du tabac et à la gestion du stress, permettait
de réduire les taux de lipides
sanguins, la tension artérielle, le
poids, et améliorait la capacité d’exercice
(114). Une alimentation quasivégétalienne
à teneur élevée en phytostérols,
fibres visqueuses, fruits à
coque et protéines de soja s’avère
aussi efficace qu’un régime pauvre en
acides gras saturés associé à la prise
de statines pour faire baisser les taux
de cholestérol LDL sérique (115).
Hypertension
Une étude transversale et une étude
de cohorte ont constaté que le taux
d’hypertension était plus bas parmi
les végétariens que parmi les nonvégétariens
(97,98). Des résultats
similaires ont été rapportés chez les
Adventistes du Septième Jour aux
Barbades (116) et dans les résultats
préliminaires de la deuxième étude
de cohorte sur la santé des Adventistes
(117). Les végétaliens semblent
avoir un taux d’hypertension inférieur
à celui des autres végétariens
(97,117).
Plusieurs études ont constaté des
tensions artérielles plus basses chez
les végétariens que chez les non-végétariens
(97, 118) bien que d’autres
études aient trouvé peu de différences
au niveau de la tension artérielle
entre végétariens et non-végétariens
(100,119,120). Au moins une
des études ayant rapporté une tension
artérielle plus basse chez les
végétariens a constaté que c’était davantage
l’IMC que l’alimentation qui
jouait un rôle dans l’écart de la tension
artérielle ajustée à l’âge (97).
L’IMC a tendance à être plus faible
chez les végétariens que chez les nonvégétariens
(99) ; ainsi, l’influence
des alimentations végétariennes sur
l’IMC peut expliquer en partie les différences
de tension artérielle relevées
entre végétariens et non-végétariens.
Les différences d’apports nutritionnels
et de modes de vie parmi les
groupes de végétariens peuvent limiter
la solidité des conclusions concernant
la relation entre alimentations
végétariennes et tension artérielle.
Dans les alimentations végétariennes,
les éventuels facteurs pouvant
aboutir à une tension artérielle
plus basse incluent l’effet combiné de
différents composés bénéfiques que
l’on trouve dans les aliments végétaux
tels que le potassium, le magnésium,
les antioxydants, certains
lipides et les fibres (118,121). Les
résultats de l’étude « Approches alimentaires
pour lutter contre l’hypertension
» (étude DASH), dans laquelle
les sujets ont consommé une alimentation
pauvre en graisses, riche en
fruits, légumes et produits laitiers,
suggèrent que des apports alimentaires
importants de potassium,
magnésium et calcium jouent un rôle
important pour réduire la tension
artérielle (122). Dans cette étude, les
apports en fruits et légumes étaient
responsables pour moitié environ de
la réduction de la tension artérielle
(123). En outre, 9 études rapportent
que la consommation de 5 à 10 portions
de fruits et légumes par jour
permet de réduire significativement
la pression artérielle (124).
Diabète
On a constaté que les Adventistes
végétariens avaient des taux de diabète
inférieurs à ceux des Adventistes
non végétariens (125). Dans
l’Étude sur la santé des Adventistes,
le risque ajusté à l’âge de développer
un diabète était deux fois plus important
chez les non-végétariens que
chez leurs homologues végétariens
(98). Bien que l’obésité augmente le
risque de diabète de type 2, il a été
constaté que la consommation de
viande et de charcuterie était un
facteur de risque de diabète important,
même après ajustement pour
l’IMC (126). Dans l’Étude sur la
Santé des Femmes (Women’s Health
Study), les auteurs ont également
observé des associations positives
entre la consommation de viande
rouge et de charcuterie et le risque de
1276 Journal of the AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION July 2009 Volume 109 Number 7
diabète après ajustement pour l’IMC,
l’apport énergétique total et l’activité
physique (127). Le risque le plus
considérable de diabète était associé
à la consommation fréquente de charcuterie,
comme le bacon et les saucisses
de type « hot-dog ». Les résultats
restaient significatifs même
après ajustement pour les fibres alimentaires,
le magnésium, les lipides
et la charge glycémique (128). Dans
une importante étude de cohorte,
le risque relatif de diabète de type 2
chez les femmes était, pour chaque
augmentation d’une portion des apports,
de 1,26 pour la viande rouge et
de 1,38 à 1,73 pour les viandes transformées
(128).
En outre, une consommation plus importante
de légumes, d’aliments à
base de céréales complètes, de légumineuses
et de fruits à coque a été
associée à un risque considérablement
inférieur de résistance à l’insuline,
de diabète de type 2 et à un
meilleur contrôle de la glycémie, que
ce soit chez des personnes normales
ou résistantes à l’insuline (129-132).
Des études d’observation ont constaté
que les alimentations riches en aliments
à base de céréales complètes
étaient associées à une sensibilité
accrue à l’insuline. Cet effet peut être
partiellement expliqué par les niveaux
importants de magnésium et
de fibres contenus dans les aliments
à base de céréales complètes (133).
Les personnes ayant une glycémie
élevée peuvent connaître une amélioration
de leur résistance à l’insuline
et des glycémies à jeun inférieures
après avoir consommé des céréales
complètes (134). Les personnes
consommant environ trois portions
par jour d’aliments à base de céréales
complètes ont de 20 à 30 % moins de
risque de développer un diabète de
type 2 en comparaison avec les
personnes qui en consomment peu
(moins de 3 portions par semaine)
(135).
Dans l’Étude sur la Santé des Infirmières
(Nurses’ Health Study), la
consommation de fruits à coque a été
inversement corrélée au risque de
diabète de type 2 après ajustement
pour l’IMC, l’activité physique et de
nombreux autres facteurs. Le risque
de diabète pour les personnes qui
consommaient des fruits à coque cinq
fois ou plus par semaine était inférieur
de 27 % par rapport aux personnes
qui ne consommaient presque
jamais de fruits à coque, alors que le
risque de diabète pour les personnes
qui consommaient du beurre de cacahuètes
au moins 5 fois par semaine
(équivalent de 150 g de cacahuètes
par semaine) était inférieur de 21 %
par rapport à celles qui n’en consommaient
presque jamais (129).
Du fait qu’elles contiennent des glucides
à assimilation lente et ont une
teneur élevée en fibres, on peut s’attendre
à ce que les légumineuses
améliorent le contrôle glycémique et
réduisent l’incidence du diabète.
Dans une importante étude prospective,
une corrélation inverse a été
observée entre l’incidence du diabète
sucré de type 2 chez des femmes
chinoises et les apports totaux de
légumineuses, de cacahuètes, de
graines de soja et d’autres légumineuses,
après ajustement pour l’IMC
et d’autres facteurs. Le risque de diabète
de type 2 était inférieur de 38 %
pour les femmes qui consommaient
beaucoup de légumineuses en général
et de 47 % pour celles qui consommaient
beaucoup de graines de soja,
par rapport à celles qui consommaient
peu ces aliments (132).
Dans une étude prospective, le risque
de diabète de type 2 était inférieur de
28 % chez les femmes qui se situaient
dans le quintile supérieur de la
consommation de légumes, mais pas
de fruits, par rapport à celles se
situant dans le quintile inférieur. Les
divers groupes de légumes étaient
tous inversement et significativement
corrélés au risque de diabète de
type 2 (131). Dans une autre étude, la
consommation de légumes à feuilles
vertes et de fruits (mais pas de jus de
fruits) a été associée à un risque plus
faible de diabète (136).
Les alimentations végétaliennes
riches en fibres sont caractérisées par
un faible index glycémique et une
charge glycémique faible à modérée
(137). Dans une étude clinique randomisée
de 5 mois, une alimentation
végétalienne pauvre en graisses a
permis d’améliorer considérablement
le contrôle glycémique de personnes
atteintes de diabète de type 2, et de
réduire la prise de médicaments antidiabétiques
chez 43 % des sujets
(138). Ces résultats étaient supérieurs
à ceux obtenus en suivant une
alimentation basée sur les recommandations
de l’Association américaine
du diabète (recommandations
personnalisées basées sur le poids
corporel et les taux de lipides sanguins,
avec 15 à 20 % de protéines,
< 7 % d’acides gras saturés, 60 à 70 %
de glucides et d’acides gras monoinsaturés,
≤ 200 mg de cholestérol).
Obésité
Parmi les Adventistes, dont environ
30 % ont une alimentation sans
viande, le mode d’alimentation végétarien
a été associé à un IMC plus
faible et il a été observé que l’IMC
augmentait en fonction de la fréquence
de la consommation de viande
aussi bien chez les hommes que chez
les femmes (98). Dans l’étude Oxford
Vegetarian Study, les valeurs de
l’IMC étaient plus élevées chez les
non-végétariens que chez les végétariens
pour toutes les tranches d’âge,
aussi bien chez les hommes que chez
les femmes (139). Dans une étude
transversale portant sur 37 875
adultes, les mangeurs de viande
avaient l’IMC ajusté pour l’âge le
plus élevé et les végétaliens avaient
le plus bas, les autres végétariens
ayant des valeurs intermédiaires
(140). Dans l’étude EPIC-Oxford Study,
au sein d’une cohorte de personnes
soucieuses de leur santé, la
prise de poids sur une période de 5
ans était la plus faible chez les personnes
qui étaient passées à une alimentation
contenant moins d’aliments
d’origine animale (141). Dans
une importante étude transversale
britannique, il a été observé que les
personnes devenues végétariennes à
l’âge adulte avaient un IMC et un
poids corporel comparables à ceux
des végétariens de naissance (53).
Cependant, les personnes ayant suivi
une alimentation végétarienne pendant
au moins 5 ans ont généralement
un IMC inférieur. Parmi les Adventistes
des Barbades, le nombre
d’obèses, végétariens depuis plus de 5
ans, était inférieur de 70 % au nombre
d’omnivores obèses alors que les végétariens
récents (depuis moins de 5
ans) avaient des poids corporels semblables
aux omnivores (116). Une alimentation
végétarienne à faible teneur
en graisses s’est avérée plus
efficace pour la perte de poids à long
terme chez les femmes ménopausées
July 2009 Volume 109 Number 7 Journal of the AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION 1277
qu’un régime plus classique du
Programme National d’Éducation au
Cholestérol (142). L’IMC plus faible
des végétariens pourrait être lié
à leur plus grande consommation
d’aliments peu caloriques et riches
en fibres, comme les fruits et les
légumes.
Cancer
Les végétariens ont tendance à avoir
un taux global de cancer inférieur à
celui de la population générale et ceci
ne concerne pas uniquement les cancers
liés au tabac. Les données de
l’Étude sur la Santé des Adventistes
ont révélé que les non-végétariens
avait un risque considérablement
accru de cancer colorectal et de cancer
de la prostate par rapport aux
végétariens, mais cette étude n’a pas
montré de différence significative
pour les cancers du poumon, du sein,
de l’utérus ou de l’estomac entre les
groupes après contrôle de l’âge, du
sexe et du tabagisme (98). L’obésité
est un important facteur d’augmentation
du risque de cancer de plusieurs
organes (143). L’IMC des végétariens
étant généralement inférieur
à celui des non-végétariens, le poids
corporel inférieur des végétariens
pourrait être un facteur important.
L’alimentation végétarienne fournit
une variété de facteurs alimentaires
protégeant du cancer (144). Des
études épidémiologiques ont systématiquement
démontré qu’une consommation
régulière de fruits et de
légumes était fortement corrélée à un
risque réduit de certains cancers
(108,145,146). En revanche, dans
l’étude Women’s Healthy Eating and
Living, chez les survivantes d’un cancer
du sein à un stade précoce, l’adoption
d’une alimentation enrichie par
l’ajout quotidien de portions de fruits
et de légumes n’a pas permis de
réduire les cas de récidive ni la mortalité
sur une période de 7 ans (147).
Les fruits et les légumes contiennent
un mélange complexe de phytonutriments
possédant une puissante action
antioxydante, antiproliférative
et protectrice contre les cancers. Les
phytonutriments peuvent présenter
des effets additionnels et synergiques,
et sont mieux assimilés dans
les aliments complets (148-150). Ces
phytonutriments interfèrent avec
plusieurs processus cellulaires impliqués
dans la progression du cancer.
Ces mécanismes incluent l’inhibition
de la prolifération cellulaire, l’inhibition
de la formation d’adduits à
l’ADN, l’inhibition des enzymes de la
phase 1, l’inhibition des voies de
transduction du signal et de l’expression
des oncogènes, l’induction de
l’arrêt du cycle cellulaire et de l’apoptose,
l’induction des enzymes de la
phase 2, en bloquant l’activation du
facteur de transcription kappa B et
en inhibant l’angiogenèse (149).
Selon le récent rapport du
Fonds Mondial de la Recherche sur le
Cancer (143), les fruits et légumes
ont un effet protecteur sur les cancers
du poumon, de la bouche, de
l’oesophage, de l’estomac et dans une
moindre mesure, d’autres organes.
La consommation régulière de légumineuses
constitue également une
mesure de protection contre les cancers
de l’estomac et de la prostate
(143). Il est indiqué que les fibres, la
vitamine C, les caroténoïdes, les flavonoïdes
et d’autres phytonutriments
contenus dans l’alimentation présentent
une protection contre plusieurs
cancers. Les alliacées pourraient protéger
du cancer de l’estomac et l’ail
protège du cancer colorectal. Il est indiqué
que les fruits riches en lycopène
(pigment rouge) protègent du
cancer de la prostate (143). Récemment,
des études de cohorte ont suggéré
qu’une consommation élevée de
céréales complètes apportait une protection
considérable contre divers
cancers (151). Une activité physique
régulière fournit une protection significative
contre la plupart des principaux
cancers (143).
Bien qu’il existe une telle variété de
phytonutriments puissants dans les
fruits et légumes, les études de populations
n’ont pas montré de grandes
différences entre les végétariens et
les non-végétariens pour l’incidence
des cancers ou le taux de mortalité
(99,152). Il est possible que des données
plus détaillées sur la consommation
alimentaire soient nécessaires
car la biodisponibilité et
l’efficacité des phytonutriments dépendent
du mode de préparation des
aliments, comme par exemple le fait
que les légumes soient crus ou cuits.
Dans le cas du cancer de la prostate,
une consommation importante de
produits laitiers peut diminuer l’effet
chimioprotecteur d’une alimentation
végétarienne. La consommation de
produits laitiers et d’autres aliments
riches en calcium a été associée à un
risque accru de cancer de la prostate
(143,153,154), bien que toutes les
études ne confortent pas cette conclusion
(155).
La consommation de viande rouge et
de charcuterie est systématiquement
associée à une augmentation
du risque de cancer colorectal (143).
À l’inverse, la consommation de légumineuses
était négativement corrélée
au risque de cancer du côlon
chez les non-végétariens (98). Dans
une analyse combinée de 14 études
de cohorte, le risque ajusté de cancer
du côlon était considérablement
réduit par une consommation élevée
de fruits et légumes, en comparaison
avec une faible consommation.
La consommation de fruits et légumes
était associée à un risque inférieur
de cancer du côlon distal,
mais pas du cancer du côlon proximal
(156). Les végétariens ont des
apports en fibres nettement plus
élevés que les non-végétariens. On
considère que des apports élevés en
fibres protègent du cancer du côlon,
bien que toutes les recherches ne le
confirment pas. L’étude EPIC impliquant
10 pays européens a constaté
une réduction de 25 % du risque de
cancer colorectal dans le quartile où
les apports en fibres étaient les plus
élevés par rapport au quartile où ils
étaient les plus bas. Sur la base de
ces données, Bingham et ses collègues
(157) ont conclu que dans les
populations ayant de faibles apports
en fibres, le fait de doubler ces apports
pourrait réduire le cancer colorectal
de 40 %. À l’inverse, une
analyse combinée de 13 études prospectives
de cohorte a conclu que des
apports élevés en fibres alimentaires
n’étaient pas associés à une
diminution du risque de cancer
colorectal après la prise en compte
de multiples facteurs de risque
(158).
Il a été démontré que les isoflavones
du soja et les aliments à base de soja
ont des propriétés anticancéreuses.
Une méta-analyse portant sur huit
études (une étude de cohorte et sept
études cas-témoins), réalisée sur des
Asiatiques consommant beaucoup de
soja, a montré une tendance signifi1278
Journal of the AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION July 2009 Volume 109 Number 7
cative de diminution du risque de
cancer du sein parallèlement à l’augmentation
des apports en soja. À l’inverse,
la consommation de soja
n’avait pas d’effet sur le risque de
cancer du sein dans des études
conduites sur 11 populations occidentales
consommant peu de soja (159).
Cependant, la controverse demeure
concernant la valeur du soja comme
agent protecteur du cancer car toutes
les études ne confirment pas l’intérêt
du soja contre le cancer du sein (160).
D’un autre côté, la consommation de
viande a été associée dans certaines
études, mais pas toutes, à un risque
accru de cancer du sein (161). Dans
une étude, le risque de cancer du sein
était accru de 50 à 60 % pour chaque
tranche supplémentaire de 100 g de
viande consommée par jour (162).
Ostéoporose
Les produits laitiers, les légumes à
feuilles vertes et les aliments d’origine
végétale enrichis en calcium
(comme certaines marques de
céréales prêtes à consommer, boissons
au soja et au riz, jus de fruits)
peuvent apporter des quantités de
calcium largement suffisantes pour
les végétariens. Les études de population
longitudinales et transversales
publiées au cours des deux dernières
décennies ne montrent pas de différence
de densité osseuse, à la fois
pour l’os cortical et pour l’os trabéculaire,
entre les omnivores et les ovolacto-
végétariens (163).
Bien qu’il y ait très peu de données
existantes sur la santé osseuse des végétaliens,
certaines études suggèrent
que la densité osseuse des végétaliens
est plus faible que celle des non-végétariens
(164,165). Les femmes asiatiques
végétaliennes avaient des
apports en protéines et en calcium
très faibles dans ces études. Des
apports protéiques inadaptés et de
faibles apports calciques se sont avérés
être associés à une perte de la
masse osseuse et à des fractures de la
hanche et de la colonne vertébrale
chez les sujets âgés (166,167). De
plus, le statut en vitamine D est insuffisant
chez certains végétaliens
(168).
Les résultats de l’étude EPIC-Oxford
apportent la preuve que le risque de
fractures osseuses est identique chez
les végétariens et chez les omnivores
(38). Le risque plus élevé de fracture
osseuse chez les végétaliens semblait
être la conséquence d’un apport en
calcium plus faible. Toutefois, les
taux de fracture des végétaliens
consommant plus de 525 mg de calcium
par jour n’étaient pas différents
des taux de fracture des omnivores
(38). D’autres facteurs associés à une
alimentation végétarienne, comme la
consommation de fruits et légumes,
les apports en soja et les apports en
légumes à feuilles vertes riches en
vitamine K doivent être pris en
compte lorsque l’on examine la santé
osseuse.
Les os jouent un rôle protecteur dans
le maintien du pH de l’organisme.
L’acidose provoque l’inhibition de
l’activité des ostéoblastes qui s’accompagne
de l’expression génomique
de protéines spécifiques de la matrice
osseuse et d’une diminution de l’activité
des phosphatases alcalines. La
production de prostaglandines par
les ostéoblastes augmente la synthèse
de la protéine transmembranaire
ostéoblastique RANK-L (Receptor
Activator of Nuclear factor
KappaB Ligand). L’acidité induit la
synthèse de la protéine RANK-L qui
elle-même stimule à son tour l’activité
ostéoclastique et le recrutement de
nouveaux ostéoclastes afin de favoriser
la résorption osseuse et de tamponner
la charge acide (169). Une
augmentation de la consommation de
fruits et de légumes a un effet positif
sur l’épargne calcique et sur les marqueurs
du métabolisme osseux (170).
L’importante quantité de potassium
et de magnésium présente dans les
fruits, les baies et les légumes, avec
leurs cendres alcalines, fait de ces aliments
des substances utiles pour l’inhibition
de la résorption osseuse
(171). La densité minérale osseuse
(DMO) du col fémoral et du rachis
lombaire chez les femmes pré-ménopausées
était d’environ 15 à 20 %
supérieure pour les femmes situées
dans le plus haut quartile pour les
apports en potassium par rapport
à celles situées dans le plus bas quartile
(172).
Il a été montré que les apports alimentaires
en potassium, un indicateur
de la production nette d’acide
endogène et des apports en fruits et
légumes avaient une légère influence
sur les marqueurs de la santé
osseuse, ce qui sur le long terme
pourrait contribuer à diminuer le
risque d’ostéoporose (173).
Des apports élevés en protéines, et
particulièrement en protéines animales,
peuvent provoquer une augmentation
de la calciurie (167,174).
Les femmes ménopausées dont l’alimentation
est riche en protéines animales
et pauvre en protéines végétales
présentent un taux élevé de
perte de masse osseuse et un risque
fortement accru de fracture de la
hanche (175). Bien que des apports
excessifs en protéines puissent nuire
à la santé osseuse, il a été prouvé que
de faibles apports en protéines peuvent
aussi augmenter le risque de
déminéralisation osseuse (176).
Le taux sanguin d’ostéocalcine non
carboxylée, un marqueur sensible du
statut en vitamine K, est utilisé
comme indicateur du risque de fracture
de la hanche (177), et pour évaluer
la DMO (178). Les résultats de
deux grandes études prospectives de
cohorte suggèrent une corrélation inverse
entre les apports en vitamine K
(et en légumes à feuilles vertes) et le
risque de fracture de la hanche
(179,180).
Des études cliniques de court terme
suggèrent que les protéines de soja
riches en isoflavones diminuent la
perte de masse osseuse rachidienne
chez les femmes ménopausées (181).
Dans une méta-analyse portant sur
10 essais contrôlés randomisés, les
isoflavones du soja apportaient un
bénéfice significatif pour la DMO
rachidienne (182). Dans un essai
contrôlé randomisé, les femmes ménopausées
recevant de la génistéine
voyaient leur excrétion urinaire de
désoxypyridinoline (un marqueur de
la résorption osseuse) diminuer
significativement et leur taux sérique
de phosphatases alcalines osseuses
(un marqueur de la formation
osseuse) augmenter (183). Dans une
autre méta-analyse portant sur
9 essais contrôlés randomisés étudiant
des femmes ménopausées, les
isoflavones du soja, en comparaison
avec un placébo, inhibaient significativement
la résorption osseuse et
stimulaient la formation osseuse
(184).
Afin de favoriser leur santé osseuse,
les végétariens devraient être encouragés
à consommer des aliments
July 2009 Volume 109 Number 7 Journal of the AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION 1279
apportant des quantités adéquates
de calcium, vitamine D, vitamine K,
potassium et magnésium, à consommer
des protéines en quantité adéquate
mais non excessive et à inclure
dans leur alimentation de larges
quantités de fruits, légumes et produits
à base de soja, avec des quantités
minimales de sodium.
Maladies rénales
Sur le long terme, des apports
protéiques élevés (supérieurs à
0,6 g / kg / jour pour une personne
atteinte d’une maladie rénale ne nécessitant
pas de dialyse ou supérieurs
aux apports journaliers recommandés
soit 0,8 g / kg / jour pour une personne
dont les reins fonctionnent
normalement) de sources aussi bien
végétales qu’animales, peuvent aggraver
une néphropathie chronique
ou causer une atteinte rénale à ceux
dont les reins fonctionnent normalement
(185). Cela pourrait être dû au
taux de filtration glomérulaire plus
élevé associé à des apports protéiques
plus élevés. Les alimentations végétaliennes
à base de soja semblent
être nutritionnellement adéquates
pour les personnes souffrant d’une
néphropathie chronique et pourraient
ralentir la progression des maladies
rénales (185).
Démence
Une étude suggère que les végétariens
ont moins de risques de développer
une démence que les non-végétariens
(186). Ce moindre risque
pourrait être dû à la plus faible tension
artérielle observée chez les végétariens
ou à leurs apports plus élevés
en antioxydants (187). D’autres facteurs
possibles de réduction du risque
pourraient être une plus faible incidence
des maladies vasculaires cérébrales
et une éventuelle moindre utilisation
du traitement hormonal de la
ménopause. Toutefois, les végétariens
peuvent avoir des facteurs de risque
de démence. Par exemple, un niveau
insuffisant en vitamine B12 a été
associé à un risque accru de démence
du fait, apparemment, de l’hyperhomocystéinémie
observée en cas de
carence en vitamine B12 (188).
Autres effets de l’alimentation
végétarienne sur la santé
Une étude de cohorte a constaté que
les végétariens d’âge moyen avaient
50 % moins de risques de diverticulose
que les non-végétariens (189).
Les fibres étaient considérées comme
le principal facteur protecteur, alors
que les apports en viande pourraient
augmenter le risque de diverticulite
(190). Dans une étude de cohorte portant
sur 800 femmes âgées de 40 à
69 ans, les non-végétariennes avaient
plus de deux fois plus de risques
de souffrir de calculs rénaux que
les végétariennes (191), même après
contrôle pour l’obésité et pour l’âge.
Plusieurs études provenant d’une
équipe de chercheurs finlandais suggèrent
qu’un jeûne suivi d’un régime
végétalien pourrait être utile dans le
traitement de la polyarthrite rhumatoïde
(192).
L’IMPACT SUR LES PROGRAMMES DE
SANTÉ ET SUR LE PUBLIC (aux États-Unis)
Le programme spécial de supplémentation
nutritionnelle pour les femmes,
les nourrissons et les enfants
Le programme de supplémentation
nutritionnelle spécifique aux femmes,
nourrissons et enfants est un programme
fédéral d’aide destiné aux
femmes enceintes, qui viennent d’accoucher
ou qui allaitent, aux nourrissons
et aux enfants de moins de
5 ans, toutes ces personnes étant davantage
exposées à des carences
nutritionnelles en raison de revenus
familiaux inférieurs à un certain
montant fixé par le gouvernement
fédéral. Ce programme fournit des
bons permettant d’acheter des aliments
convenant aux végétariens,
comme des préparations pour nourrissons,
des céréales pour nourrissons
enrichies en fer, des jus de fruits
ou de légumes riches en vitamine C,
des carottes, du lait de vache, du fromage,
des oeufs, des céréales toutes
prêtes enrichies en fer, des haricots
ou pois secs et du beurre de cacahuètes.
Des modifications récentes de
ce programme tendent à encourager
l’achat de céréales et pains complets,
permettent de substituer les haricots
en boîte par des haricots secs et prévoient
des bons pour l’achat de fruits
et légumes frais (193). Les boissons
au soja et le tofu riche en calcium qui
répondent aux spécifications peuvent
se substituer au lait de vache pour les
femmes et les enfants ayant une
prescription médicale (193).
Les programmes nutritionnels
pour les enfants
Le Programme national des repas
scolaires autorise les produits protéiques
non carnés dont certains produits
à base de soja, le fromage, les
oeufs, les haricots et les pois secs cuits,
les yaourts, le beurre de cacahuètes et
autres pâtes à tartiner issues de
fruits à coque ou de graines, les cacahuètes,
les fruits à coque et les graines
(194). Les repas servis doivent être
conformes au Guide alimentaire pour
la population américaine de 2005 et
apporter au minimum un tiers des
Apports Nutritionnels Conseillés en
énergie, protéines, vitamines A et C,
fer et calcium. Les écoles n’ont pas
l’obligation d’adapter les repas en
fonction des choix alimentaires d’une
famille ou d’un enfant bien qu’elles
soient autorisées à donner des aliments
de substitution aux enfants
ayant un certificat médical attestant
de besoins alimentaires spécifiques
(195). Certaines écoles publiques proposent
régulièrement des options
végétariennes et végétaliennes dans
leurs menus et cela semble être plus
courant que par le passé bien que
beaucoup d’écoles n’offrent que peu
d’options pour les végétariens dans
leurs programmes de restauration
scolaire (196). Les écoles publiques
sont autorisées à proposer du lait de
soja aux enfants qui apportent une
attestation de leurs parents ou de
leur tuteur spécifiant les besoins alimentaires
de l’élève. Les laits de soja
doivent répondre à des normes spécifiques
afin d’être approuvés comme
aliments de substitution et les surcoûts
par rapport aux remboursements
du gouvernement fédéral sont
à la charge des écoles (197).
Les programmes alimentaires pour
personnes âgées
Le Programme nutritionnel fédéral
pour les personnes âgées distribue
des fonds aux États, aux territoires et
aux associations tribales dans le
cadre d’un réseau national de programmes
qui fournit des repas groupés
et livrés à domicile (souvent
dénommés « Meals on Wheels ») pour
les Américains âgés. Les repas sont
souvent fournis par des agences
1280 Journal of the AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION July 2009 Volume 109 Number 7
locales de « Meals on Wheels ». Un
ensemble de menus végétariens sur
4 semaines a été élaboré pour la Fondation
nationale « Meals on Wheels »
(198). Des menus similaires ont été
adaptés par des programmes particuliers
dont celui du service pour les
personnes âgées de la ville de New
York qui a validé un ensemble de menus
végétariens sur 4 semaines (199).
Les aménagements pour les prisonniers
Aux États-Unis, des décisions judiciaires
ont accordé aux personnes
emprisonnées le droit à des repas végétariens
pour certaines raisons religieuses
ou médicales (200). Dans le
système carcéral fédéral, les menus
végétariens sont fournis uniquement
aux détenus pouvant attester que
leur alimentation fait partie d’une
pratique religieuse établie (201).
Après examen et avec l’accord du personnel
de l’aumônerie, le détenu est
autorisé à participer au Programme
d’alimentation alternative, soit en
choisissant lui-même une option sans
viande parmi les plats principaux et
en accédant au buffet de salades et de
plats chauds, soit par un approvisionnement
en aliments transformés reconnus
par le gouvernement et certifiés
compatibles sur le plan religieux
(202). Lorsque les repas sont servis
en plateaux préparés, des procédures
sont mises au point localement pour
l’approvisionnement en aliments non
carnés (201). Dans d’autres prisons,
la procédure d’obtention de repas
végétariens et le type de plats disponibles
varie en fonction du lieu et
du type de prison (201). Certaines
prisons offrent des alternatives à
la viande, alors que d’autres se
contentent de l’enlever du plateau
des détenus.
Les forces militaires / armées
Le Programme alimentaire des forces
des États-Unis, qui supervise toutes
les réglementations alimentaires,
propose un choix de menus végétariens,
notamment des repas végétariens
prêts à consommer (203,204).
Les autres institutions et services de
restauration collective
D’autres institutions, notamment les
établissements d’enseignement supérieur,
les universités, les hôpitaux, les
restaurants, les parcs et musées
publics, offrent des plats végétariens
en quantité et en variété plus ou
moins grandes. Des ressources sont
disponibles pour des préparations
alimentaires végétariennes destinées
à la restauration collective.
Le rôle et les responsabilités
des professionnels de la diététique
et de la nutrition
Une prise en charge nutritionnelle
peut être hautement bénéfique pour
les patients végétariens qui présentent
des problèmes de santé spécifiques
liés à de mauvais choix
alimentaires ainsi que pour les végétariens
dont l’état clinique nécessite
des modifications alimentaires supplémentaires
(par exemple en cas de
diabète, d’hyperlipidémie ou de maladie
rénale). En fonction du niveau de
connaissances du patient, une prise
en charge nutritionnelle peut être
utile pour les végétariens débutants
et pour les personnes traversant
diverses périodes de la vie comme la
grossesse, la petite enfance, l’enfance,
l’adolescence et pour les personnes
âgées. Les professionnels de la diététique
et de la nutrition ont un rôle important
à jouer pour aider ceux qui
expriment leur intérêt pour les alimentations
végétariennes ou ceux qui
sont déjà végétariens à concevoir une
alimentation végétarienne saine. Les
professionnels de la nutrition devraient
également être en mesure de
fournir des informations exactes et à
jour concernant la nutrition végétarienne.
Les informations données doivent
être personnalisées en fonction
du type d’alimentation végétarienne,
de l’âge du patient, de ses compétences
culinaires et de son niveau
d’activité physique. Il est important
d’écouter la description que le patient
fait lui-même de son alimentation
afin d’établir quels sont les aliments à
prendre en compte dans la planification
des repas. La figure 1 fournit des
suggestions pour la planification des
repas. La figure 2 fournit une liste de
sites Internet de référence pour les
alimentations végétariennes.
Les professionnels qualifiés en diététique
et en nutrition peuvent aider
les patients végétariens sur les points
suivants :
• Fournir des informations sur la nécessité
de couvrir les besoins en vitamine
B12, calcium, vitamine D,
zinc, fer et acides gras oméga-3,
parce que les régimes végétariens
mal conçus peuvent quelquefois
être carencés en ces nutriments.
• Donner des conseils ciblés pour
organiser des repas ovo-lacto-végétariens
ou végétaliens bien équilibrés
adaptés à toutes les périodes
de la vie.
• Fournir des informations sur les
mesures générales de promotion de
la santé et de prévention des maladies.
• Adapter les conseils pour organiser
des repas ovo-lacto-végétariens ou
végétaliens bien équilibrés aux patients
ayant des besoins alimentaires
particuliers du fait d’une allergie
ou d’une maladie chronique
ou d’autres contraintes.
• Bien connaître les options végétariennes
des restaurants locaux.
• Donner des idées pour une planification
optimale des repas lors des
voyages.
• Donner des instructions aux patients
sur la préparation et l’utilisation
des aliments qui font fréquemment
partie des régimes végétariens.
Le choix croissant de produits destinés
aux végétariens ne permet pas
toujours de connaître tous ces produits.
Toutefois, les praticiens ayant
des patients végétariens devraient
avoir des connaissances de base
concernant la préparation, l’utilisation
et la valeur nutritionnelle d’une
variété de céréales, légumineuses,
produits à base de soja, aliments simili-
carnés et aliments enrichis.
• Bien connaître les points de vente
d’aliments végétariens. Dans certains
endroits, des adresses de
vente par correspondance peuvent
s’avérer nécessaires.
• Travailler avec les membres de la
famille, particulièrement les parents
d’enfants végétariens, afin de
contribuer à fournir les meilleures
conditions possibles pour couvrir
les besoins en nutriments à partir
d’une alimentation végétarienne.
• Si un praticien n’est pas familiarisé
avec la nutrition végétarienne, il
doit aider la personne à chercher
quelqu’un de qualifié pour la renseigner
ou l’orienter vers des
sources d’information fiables.
July 2009 Volume 109 Number 7 Journal of the AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION 1281
Sites internet utiles
(voir les notes des traducteurs pour des
sites en français)
Vegetarian Nutrition Dietetic Practice
Group
http://vegetariannutrition.net
Andrews University Nutrition
Department
http://www.vegetarian-nutrition.info
Center for Nutrition Policy and
Promotion
http://www.mypyramid.gov/tips_
resources/vegetarian_diets.html
Food and Nutrition Information Center
http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/pubs/bibs/
gen/vegetarian.pdf
Mayo Clinic
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/
vegetarian-diet/HQ01596
Medline Plus, Vegetarian Diets
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/
vegetariandiet.html
Seventh-day Adventist Dietetic
Association
http://www.sdada.org/plant.htm
The Vegan Society (vitamine B12)
http://www.vegansociety.com/lifestyle/
nutrition/b12.aspx
The Vegetarian Resource Group
http://www.vrg.org
The Vegetarian Society of the United
Kingdom
http://www.vegsoc.org/health
Figure 2
Les professionnels qualifiés en diététique
et en nutrition peuvent aussi
jouer un rôle clé en s’assurant que les
besoins des végétariens sont couverts
dans les services de restauration collective,
notamment au sein des programmes
nutritionnels pour les
enfants, pour les personnes âgées,
pour les prisonniers, pour les militaires,
dans les établissements d’enseignement
supérieur, les universités
et les hôpitaux. Cela peut être réalisé
par l’élaboration de guides spécifiques
présentant les besoins des
végétariens, par la conception et la
mise en oeuvre de menus acceptables
pour les végétariens, et en évaluant
si oui ou non un programme permet
de couvrir les besoins des personnes
végétariennes.
CONCLUSIONS
Les alimentations végétariennes
conçues de façon appropriée ont montré
qu’elles étaient bonnes pour la
santé, adéquates sur le plan nutritionnel
et qu’elles pouvaient être
bénéfiques pour la prévention et le
traitement de certaines maladies.
L’alimentation végétarienne est
adaptée à toutes les périodes de la
vie. De nombreuses raisons motivent
l’intérêt croissant pour le végétarisme.
On s’attend à une augmentation
du nombre de végétariens aux
États-Unis au cours de la prochaine
décennie. Les professionnels de la
diététique et de la nutrition peuvent
aider leurs patients végétariens en
leur fournissant des informations
exactes et à jour sur la nutrition
végétarienne, les aliments et les
sources d’information disponibles.
Références
1. Types and Diversity of Vegetarian
Nutrition.American Dietetic Association
EvidenceAnalysis Library Web site. http://
www.adaevidencelibrary.com/topic.cfm?cat_
3897. Accessed March 17, 2009.
2. Stahler C. How many adults are
vegetarian? The Vegetarian Resource
Group Web site. http://www.vrg.org/journal/
vj2006issue4/vj2006issue4poll.htm. Posted
December 20, 2006. Accessed January 20,
2009.
3. Stahler C. How many youth are vegetarian?
The Vegetarian Resource Group Web site.
http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2005issue4/
vj2005issue4youth.htm. Posted October 7,
2005. Accessed January 20, 2009.
4. Lea EJ, Crawford D, Worsley A. Public
views of the benefits and barriers to the
consumption of a plant-based diet. Eur
J Clin Nutr. 2006;60:828-37.
5. Mintel International Group Limited.
Eating Habits-US-July 2004. Chicago, IL:
Mintel International Group Limited; 2004.
6. What’s hot, what’s not. Chef survey.
National Restaurant Association Web site.
http://www.restaurant.org/pdfs/research/
200711chefsurvey.pdf. Accessed January
20, 2009.
7. Mintel International Group Limited.
Vegetarian Foods (Processed –US–June
2007. Chicago, IL: Mintel International
Group Limited; 2007.
8. Young VR, Pellett PL. Plant proteins in
relation to human protein and amino acid
nutrition. Am J Clin Nutr. 1994;59 (suppl):
1203S-1212S.
9. Rand WM, Pellett PL, Young VR.
Metaanalysis of nitrogen balance studies for
estimating protein requirements in healthy
adults. Am J Clin Nutr. 2003;77:109-127.
10. Young VR, Fajardo L, Murray E, Rand WM,

3
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
saveallGOD'sAnimals
Admin


Masculin Nombre de messages : 19955
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme   Ven 14 Jan - 6:46

man: Comparative nitrogen balance
response within the submaintenanceto-
maintenance range of intakes of wheat
and beef proteins. J Nutr. 1975;105:534-542.
11. FAO/WHO/UNU Expert Consultation on
Protein and Amino Acid Requirements in
Human Nutrition. Protein and Amino Acid
Requirements in Human Nutrition: Report
of a Joint FAO/WHO/UNU Expert
Consultation. Geneva, Switzerland: World
Health Organization; 2002. WHO Technical
Report Series No. 935.
12. Messina V, Mangels R, Messina M. The
Dietitian’s Guide to Vegetarian Diets: Issues
and Applications. 2nd ed. Sudbury,
MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers; 2004.
13. Tipton KD, Witard OC. Protein
requirements and recommendations
for athletes: Relevance of ivory tower
arguments for practical recommendations.
Clin Sports Med. 2007;26:17-36.
14. Williams CM, Burdge G. Long-chain n-3
PUFA: plant v. marine sources. Proc Nutr
Soc. 2006;65:42-50.
15. Rosell MS, Lloyd-Wright Zechariah,
Appleby PN, Sanders TA, Allen NE, Key
TJ. Longchain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty
acids in plasma in British meat-eating,
vegetarian, and vegan men. Am J Clin Nutr.
2005;82: 327-334.
16. Conquer JA, Holub BJ. Supplementation
with an algae source of docosahexaenoic
acid increases (n-3) fatty acid status and
alters selected risk factors for heart disease
in vegetarian subjects. J Nutr.
1996;126:3032-3039.
17. Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition
Board. Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy,
Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids,
Cholesterol,Protein, and Amino Acids.
Washington, DC: National Academies Press;
2002.
18. Geppert J, Kraft V, Demmelmair H,
Koletzko B. Docosahexaenoic acid
supplementation in vegetarians effectively
increases omega-3 index: a randomized
trial. Lipids. 2005;40:807-814.
19. Coudray C, Bellanger J, Castiglia-Delavaud
C, Remesy C, Vermorel M, Rayssignuier Y.
Effect of soluble or partly soluble dietary
fibres supplementation on absorption and
balance of calcium, magnesium, iron and
zinc in healthy young men. Eur J Clin Nutr.
1997; 51:375-380.
20. Harland BF, Morris E R. Phytate a good or
bad food component. Nutr Res.
1995;15:733-754.
21. Sandberg AS, Brune M, Carlsson NG,
Hallberg L, Skoglund E, Rossander-Hulthen
L. Inositol phosphates with different
numbers of phosphate groups influence iron
1282 Journal of the AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION July 2009 Volume 109 Number 7
absorption in humans. Am J Clin Nutr.
1999;70: 240-246.
22. Manary MJ, Krebs NF, Gibson RS,
Broadhead RL, Hambidge KM.
Community-based dietary phytate
reduction and its effect on iron status in
Malawian children. Ann Trop Paediatr.
2002;22:133-136.
23. Macfarlane BJ, van der Riet WB, Bothwell
TH, Baynes RD, Siegenberg D, Schmidt U,
Tol A, Taylor JRN, Mayet F. Effect of
traditional Oriental soy products on iron
absorption. Am J Clin Nutr.
1990;51:873-880.
24. Hallberg L, Hulthen L. Prediction of
dietary iron absorption: an algorithm for
calculating absorption and bioavailability
of dietary iron. Am J Clin Nutr.
2000;71:1147-1160.
25. Fleming DJ, Jacques PF, Dallal GE,
Tucker KL, Wilson PW, Wood RJ. Dietary
determinants of iron stores in a free-living
elderly population: The Framingham Heart
Study. Am J Clin Nutr. 1998;67:722-733.
26. Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition
Board. Dietary Reference Intakes for
Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron,
Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron,
Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon,
Vanadium, and Zinc. Washington, DC:
National Academies Press; 2001.
27. Hunt JR, Roughead ZK. Nonheme-iron
absorption, fecal ferritin excretion, and
blood indexes of iron status in women
consuming controlled lactoovovegetarian
diets for 8 wk. Am J Clin Nutr.
1999;69:944-952.
28. Hunt JR, Roughead ZK. Adaptation of iron
absorption in men consuming diets with
high or low iron bioavailability. Am J Clin
Nutr. 2000;71:94-102.
29. Ball MJ, Bartlett MA. Dietary intake and
iron status of Australian vegetarian
women. Am J Clin Nutr. 1999;70:353-358.
30. Alexander D, Ball MJ, Mann J. Nutrient
intake and haematological status
of vegetarians and age-sex matched
omnivores. Eur J Clin Nutr.
1994;48:538-546.
31. Hunt JR. Bioavailability of iron, zinc, and
other trace minerals from vegetarian diets.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2003;78(suppl):633S-639S.
32. Davey GK, Spencer EA, Appleby PN, Allen
NE, Knox KH, Key TJ. EPIC – Oxford:
Lifestyle characteristics and nutrient
intakes in a cohort of 33,883 meat-eaters
and 31,546 non meat-eaters in the UK.
Public Health Nutr. 2003;6:259-268.
33. Janelle KC, Barr SI. Nutrient intakes and
eating behavior scores of vegetarian and
nonvegetarian women. J Am Diet Assoc.
1995;95:180-189.
34. Lonnerdal B. Dietary factors influencing
zinc absorption. J Nutr. 2000;130(suppl):
1378S-1383S.
35. Krajcovicova M, Buckova K, Klimes
I, Sebokova E. Iodine deficiency in
vegetarians and vegans. Ann Nutr Metab.
2003;47:183-185.
36. Teas J, Pino S, Critchley A, Braverman LE.
Variability of iodine content in common
commercially available edible seaweeds.
Thyroid. 2004;14:836-841.
37. Messina M, Redmond G. Effects of soy
protein and soybean isoflavones on thyroid
function in healthy adults and hypothyroid
patients: a review of the relevant literature.
Thyroid. 2006;16:249-258.
38. Appleby P, Roddam A, Allen N, Key T.
Comparative fracture in vegetarians and
nonvegetarians in EPIC-Oxford. Eur J Clin
Nutr. 2007;61:1400-1406.
39. Weaver C, Proulx W, Heaney R. Choices for
achieving adequate dietary calcium with a
vegetarian diet. Am J Clin Nutr.
1999;70(suppl):543S-548S.
40. Zhao Y, Martin BR, Weaver CM. Calcium
bioavailability of calcium carbonate
fortified soymilk is equivalent to cow’s milk
in young women. J Nutr.
2005;135:2379-2382.
41. Messina V, Melina V, Mangels AR. A new
food guide for North American vegetarians.
J Am Diet Assoc. 2003;103:771-775.
42. Dunn-Emke SR, Weidner G, Pettenall EB,
Marlin RO, Chi C, Ornish DM. Nutrient
adequacy of a very low-fat vegan diet. J Am
Diet Assoc. 2005;105:1442-1446.
43. Parsons TJ, van Dusseldorp M, van der
Vliet M, van de Werken K, Schaafsma G,
van Staveren WA. Reduced bone mass in
Dutch adolescents fed a macrobiotic diet in
early life. J Bone Miner Res. 1997;
12:1486-1494.
44. Armas LAG, Hollis BW, Heaney RP.
Vitamin D2 is much less effective than
vitamin D3 in humans. J Clin Endocrinol
Metab. 2004;89:5387-5391.
45. Holick MF, Biancuzzo RM, Chen TC, Klein
EK, Young A, Bibuld D, Reitz R, Salameh
W, Ameri A, Tannenbaum AD. Vitamin D2
is as effective as vitamin D3 in maintaining
circulating concentrations of
25-hydroxyvitamin D. J Clin Endocrinol
Metab. 2008;93: 677-681.
46. Donaldson MS. Metabolic vitamin B12
status on a mostly raw vegan diet with
follow-up using tablets, nutritional yeast,
or probiotic supplements. Ann Nutr Metab.
2000;44:229-234.
47. Herrmann W, Schorr H, Purschwitz K,
Rassoul F, Richter V. Total homocysteine,
vitamin B12, and total antioxidant status
in vegetarians. Clin Chem.
2001;47:1094-1101.
48. Herrmann W, Geisel J. Vegetarian lifestyle
and monitoring of vitamin B-12 status.
Clin Chim Acta. 2002;326:47-59.
49. Messina V, Mangels AR. Considerations in
planning vegan diets: Children. J Am Diet
Assoc. 2001;101:661-669.
50. Hebbelinck M, Clarys P. Physical growth
and development of vegetarian children
and adolescents. In: Sabate J, ed.
Vegetarian Nutrition. Boca Raton, FL: CRC
Press; 2001:173-193.
51. Mangels AR, Messina V. Considerations in
planning vegan diets: infants. J Am Diet
Assoc. 2001;101:670-677.
52. General Conference Nutrition Council. My
Vegetarian Food Pyramid. Loma Linda
University Web site. http://www.llu.edu/
llu/nutrition/vegfoodpyramid.pdf. Accessed
January 20, 2009.
53. Rosell M, Appleby P, Key T. Height, age at
menarche, body weight and body mass
index in life-long vegetarians. Public
Health Nutr. 2005;8:870-875.
54. Perry CL, McGuire MT, Neumark-Sztainer
D, Story M. Adolescent vegetarians. How
well do their dietary patterns meet the
Healthy People 2010 objectives? Arch
Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2002;156:431-437.
55. Larsson CL, Johansson GK. Young Swedish
vegans have different sources of nutrients
than young omnivores. J Am Diet Assoc.
2005;105:1438-1441.
56. Krajcovicova-Kudlackova M, Simoncic R,
Bederova A, Grancicova E, Megalova T.
Influence of vegetarian and mixed nutrition
on selected haematological and biochemical
parameters in children. Nahrung.
1997;41:311-314.
57. Vegetarian Nutrition in Pregnancy.
American Dietetic Association Evidence
Analysis Library Web site. http://www.
adaevidencelibrary.com/topic.cfm?cat3125.
Accessed March 17, 2009.
58. Campbell-Brown M, Ward RJ, Haines AP,
North WR, Abraham R, McFadyen IR,
Turnlund JR, King JC. Zinc and copper in
Asian pregnancies—is there evidence for a
nutritional deficiency? Br J Obstet
Gynaecol. 1985;92:875-885.
59. Drake R, Reddy S, Davies J. Nutrient
intake during pregnancy and pregnancy
outcome of lacto-ovo-vegetarians, fisheaters
and non-vegetarians. Veg Nutr.
1998;2:45-52.
60. Ganpule A, Yajnik CS, Fall CH, Rao S,
Fisher DJ, Kanade A, Cooper C, Naik S,
Joshi N, Lubree H, Deshpande V, Joglekar
C. Bone mass in Indian children—
Relationships to maternal nutritional
status and diet during pregnancy: The
Pune Maternal Nutrition Study. J Clin
Endocrinol Metab. 2006; 91:2994-3001.
61. Reddy S, Sanders TA, Obeid O. The
influence of maternal vegetarian diet on
essential fatty acid status of the newborn.
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1994;48:358-368.
62. North K, Golding J. A maternal vegetarian
diet in pregnancy is associated with
hypospadias. The ALSPAC Study Team.
Avon Longitudinal Study of Pregnancy and
Childhood. BJU Int. 2000;85:107-113.
63. Cheng PJ, Chu DC, Chueh HY, See LC,
Chang HC, Weng DR. Elevated maternal
midtrimester serum free beta-human
chorionic gonadotropin levels in vegetarian
pregnancies that cause increased falsepositive
Down syndrome screening results.
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2004;190:442-447.
64. Ellis R, Kelsay JL, Reynolds RD, Morris
ER, Moser PB, Frazier CW. Phytate:zinc
and phytate X calcium:zinc millimolar
ratios in self-selected diets of Americans,
Asian Indians, and Nepalese. J Am Diet
Assoc. 1987;87:1043-1047.
65. King JC, Stein T, Doyle M. Effect of
vegetarianism on the zinc status of
pregnant women. Am J Clin Nutr.
1981:34;1049-1055.
66. Koebnick C, Heins UA, Hoffmann I,
Dagnelie PC, Leitzmann C. Folate status
during pregnancy in women is improved by
long-term high vegetable intake compared
with the average western diet. J Nutr.
2001;131:733-739.
67. Koebnick C, Hoffmann I, Dagnelie PC,
Heins UA, Wickramasinghe SN, Ratnayaka
ID, Gruendel S, Lindemans J, Leitzmann
C. Long-term ovo-lacto vegetarian diet
impairs vitamin B-12 status in pregnant
women. J Nutr. 2004;134:3319-3326.
July 2009 Volume 109 Number 7 Journal of the AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION 1283
68. Koebnick C, Leitzmann R, Garcia AL,
Heins UA, Heuer T, Golf S, Katz N,
Hoffmann I, Leitzmann C. Long-term
effect of a plant-based diet on magnesium
status during pregnancy. Eur J Clin Nutr.
2005;59:219-225.
69. Ward RJ, Abraham R, McFadyen IR,
Haines AD, North WR, Patel M, Bhatt RV.
Assessment of trace metal intake and
status in a Gujerati pregnant Asian
population and their influence on the
outcome of pregnancy. Br J Obstet
Gynaecol. 1988;95: 676-682.
70. Lakin V, Haggarty P, Abramovich DR.
Dietary intake and tissue concentrations
of fatty acids in omnivore, vegetarian, and
diabetic pregnancy. Prost Leuk Ess Fatty
Acids. 1998;58:209-220.
71. Sanders TAB, Reddy S. The influence of a
vegetarian diet on the fatty acid
composition of human milk and the
essential fatty acid status of the infant. J
Pediatr. 1992; 120(suppl):S71-S77.
72. Jensen CL, Voigt RG, Prager TC, Zou YL,
Fraley JK, Rozelle JC, Turcich MR,
Llorente AM, Anderson RE, Heird WC.
Effects of maternal docosahexaenoic acid
on visual function and neurodevelopment
in breastfed term infants. Am J Clin Nutr.
2005;82:125-132.
73. Smuts CM, Borod E, Peeples JM, Carlson
SE. High-DHA eggs: Feasibility as a means
to enhance circulating DHA in mother and
infant. Lipids. 2003;38:407-414.
74. DeGroot RH, Hornstra G, van Houwelingen
AC, Roumen F. Effect of alpha-linolenic
acid supplementation during pregnancy on
maternal and neonatal polyunsaturated
fatty acid status and pregnancy outcome.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2004;79:251-260.
75. Francois CA, Connor SL, Bolewicz LC,
Connor WE. Supplementing lactating
women with flaxseed oil does not increase
docosahexaenoic acid in their milk. Am J
Clin Nutr. 2003;77:226-233.
76. Allen LH. Zinc and micronutrient
supplements for children. Am J Clin Nutr.
1998; 68(suppl):495S-498S.
77. Van Dusseldorp M, Arts ICW, Bergsma JS,
De Jong N, Dagnelie PC, Van Staveren
WA. Catch-up growth in children fed a
macrobiotic diet in early childhood. J Nutr.
1996;126:2977-2983.
78. Millward DJ. The nutritional value of plantbased
diets in relation to human amino
acid and protein requirements. Proc Nutr
Soc. 1999;58:249-260.
79. Kissinger DG, Sanchez A. The association
of dietary factors with the age of menarche.
Nutr Res. 1987;7:471-479.
80. Barr SI. Women’s reproductive function.
In: Sabate J, ed. Vegetarian Nutrition. Boca
Raton, FL: CRC Press; 2001;221-249.
81. Donovan UM, Gibson RS. Iron and zinc
status of young women aged 14 to 19 years
consuming vegetarian and omnivorous
diets. J Am Coll Nutr. 1995;14:463-472.
82. Curtis MJ, Comer LK. Vegetarianism,
dietary restraint, and feminist identity. Eat
Behav. 2006;7:91-104.
83. Perry CL, McGuire MT, Newmark-Sztainer
D, Story M. Characteristics of vegetarian
adolescents in a multiethnic urban
population. J Adolesc Health.
2001;29:406-416.
84. American Dietetic Association. Position
Paper of the American Dietetic Association:
Nutrition across the spectrum of aging.
J Am Diet Assoc. 2005;105:616-633.
85. Marsh AG, Christiansen DK, Sanchez TV,
Mickelsen O, Chaffee FL. Nutrient
similarities and differences of older lactoovo-
vegetarian and omnivorous women.
Nutr Rep Int. 1989;39:19-24.
86. Brants HAM, Lowik MRH, Westenbrink S,
Hulshof KFAM, Kistemaker C. Adequacy
of a vegetarian diet at old age (Dutch
Nutrition Surveillance System). J Am Coll
Nutr. 1990;9:292-302.
87. Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition
Board. Dietary Reference Intakes for
Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6,
Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid,
Biotin, and Choline. Washington, DC:
National Academies Press; 1998.
88. Holick MF. Vitamin D deficiency. N Engl
J Med. 2007;357:266-281.
89. Campbell WW, Johnson CA, McCabe GP,
Carnell NS. Dietary protein requirements
of younger and older adults. Am J Clin
Nutr. 2008;88:1322-1329.
90. American Dietetic Association. Position of
the American Dietetic Association,
Dietitians of Canada, and the American
College of Sports Medicine: Nutrition and
athletic performance. J Am Diet Assoc.
2009;109: 509-527.
91. Venderley AM, Campbell WW. Vegetarian
diets. Nutritional considerations for
athletes. Sports Med. 2006;36:295-305.
92. Lukaszuk JM, Robertson RJ, Arch JE,
Moore GE, Yaw KM, Kelley DE, Rubin JT,
Moyna NM. Effect of creatine
supplementation and a lacto-ovo-vegetarian
diet on muscle creatine concentration. Int J
Sports Nutr Exer Metab. 2002;12:336-337.
93. Burke DG, Chilibeck PD, Parise G, Candow
DG, Mahoney D, Tarnopolsky M. Effect of
creatine and weight training on muscle
creatine and performance in vegetarians.
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2003;35:1946-1955.
94. Kaiserauer S, Snyder AC, Sleeper M,
Zierath J. Nutritional, physiological, and
menstrual status of distance runners. Med
Sci Sports Exerc. 1989;21:120-125.
95. Slavin J, Lutter J, Cushman S. Amenorrhea
in vegetarian athletes. Lancet.
1984;1:1974-1975.
96. Vegetarian Nutrition and Cardiovascular
Disease. American Dietetic Association
Evidence Analysis Library Web site. http://
www.adaevidencelibrary.com/topic.cfm?cat
3536. Accessed March 17, 2009.
97. Appleby PN, Davey GK, Key TJ.
Hypertension and blood pressure among
meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians and
vegans in EPIC-Oxford. Public Health Nutr.
2002;5: 645-654.
98. Fraser GE. Associations between diet and
cancer, ischemic heart disease, and allcause
mortality in non-Hispanic white California
Seventh-day Adventists. Am J Clin
Nutr. 1999;70(suppl):532S-538S.
99. Key TJ, Fraser GE, Thorogood M, Appleby
PN, Beral V, Reeves G, Burr ML, Chang-
Claude J, Frentzel-Beyme R, Kuzma JW,
Mann J, McPherson K. Mortality in
vegetarians and nonvegetarians: Detailed
findings from a collaborative analysis of 5
prospective studies. Am J Clin Nutr.
1999;70(suppl):516S-524S.
100. Williams PT. Interactive effects of exercise,
alcohol, and vegetarian diet on coronary
artery disease risk factors in 9,242 runners:
The National Runners’ Health Study.
Am J Clin Nutr. 1997;66:1197-1206.
101. Mahon AK, Flynn MG, Stewart LK, Mc-
Farlin BK, Iglay HB, Mattes RD, Lyle RM,
Considine RV, Campbell WW. Protein
intake during energy restriction: Effects on
body composition and markers of metabolic
and cardiovascular health in
postmenopausal women. J Am Coll Nutr.
2007;26:182-189.
102.Mukuddem-Petersen J, Oosthuizen W,
Jerling JC. A systematic review of the
effects of nuts on blood lipid profiles in
humans. J Nutr. 2005;135:2082-2089.
103.Rimbach G, Boesch-Saadatmandi C, Frank
J, Fuchs D, Wenzel U, Daniel H, Hall WL,
Weinberg PD. Dietary isoflavones in the
prevention of cardiovascular disease - A
molecular perspective. Food Chem Toxicol.
2008;46:1308-1319.
104. Katan MB, Grundy SM, Jones P, Law M,
Miettinen T, Paoletti R; Stresa Workshop
Participants. Efficacy and safety of plant
stanols and sterols in the management of
blood cholesterol levels. Mayo Clin Proc.
2003;78:965-978.
105.Sirtori CR, Eberini I, Arnoldi A.
Hypocholesterolaemic
effects of soya proteins: Results
of recent studies are predictable from
the Anderson meta-analysis data. Br J
Nutr. 2007;97:816-822.
106.Fraser GE. Diet, Life Expectancy, and
Chronic Disease. Studies of Seventh-day
Adventists and Other Vegetarians. New
York, NY: Oxford University Press; 2003.
107.Kelly JH Jr, Sabaté J. Nuts and coronary
heart disease: An epidemiological
perspective. Br J Nutr.
2006;96(suppl):S61-S67.
108.Liu RH. Health benefits of fruits and
vegetables are from additive and
synergistic combinations of phytochemicals.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2003;78(suppl):517S-520S.
109. Perez-Vizcaino F, Duarte J,
Andriantsitohaina R. Endothelial function
and cardiovascular disease: Effects of
quercetin and wine polyphenols. Free Radic
Res. 2006;40: 1054-1065.
110. Lin CL, Fang TC, Gueng MK. Vascular
dilatory functions of ovo-lactovegetarians
compared with omnivores. Atherosclerosis.
2001;158:247-251.
111.Waldmann A, Koschizke JW, Leitzmann C,
Hahn A. Homocysteine and cobalamin
status in German vegans. Public Health
Nutr. 2004;7:467-472.
112.Herrmann W, Schorr H, Obeid R, Geisel J.
Vitamin B-12 status, particularly
holotranscobalamin II and
methylmalonic acid concentrations, and
hyperhomocysteinemia in vegetarians.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2003; 78:131-136.
113.Van Oijen MGH, Laheij RJF, Jansen
JBMJ, Verheugt FWA. The predictive
value of vitamin B-12 concentrations and
hyperhomocysteinemia for cardiovascular
disease. Neth Heart J. 2007;15:291-294.
114.Koertge J, Weidner G, Elliott-Eller M,
Scherwitz L, Merritt-Worden TA, Marlin
R, Lipsenthal L, Guarneri M, Finkel R,
1284 Journal of the AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION July 2009 Volume 109 Number 7
Saunders Jr DE, McCormac P, Scheer JM,
Collins RE, Ornish D. Improvement in
medical risk factors and quality of life in
women and men with coronary artery
disease in the Multicenter Lifestyle
Demonstration Project. Am J Cardiol.
2003;91:1316-1322.
115.Jenkins DJ, Kendall CW, Marchie A,
Faulkner DA, Wong JM, de Souza R,
Emam A, Parker TL, Vidgen E, Trautwein
EA, Lapsley KG, Josse RG, Leiter LA,
Singer W, Connelly PW. Direct comparison
of a dietary portfolio of cholesterol-lowering
foods with a statin in hypercholesterolemic
participants. Am J Clin Nutr.
2005;81:380-387.
116.Braithwaite N, Fraser HS, Modeste N,
Broome H, King R. Obesity, diabetes,
hypertension, and vegetarian status among
Seventh-day Adventists in Barbados:
Preliminary results. Eth Dis. 2003;13:34-39.
117.Fraser GE. Vegetarian diets: What do we
know of their effects on common chronic
diseases? Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89(suppl)
1607S-1612S.
118.Sacks FM, Kass EH. Low blood pressure in
vegetarians: Effects of specific foods and
nutrients. Am J Clin Nutr.
1988;48:795-800.
119.Melby CL, Toohey ML, Cebrick J. Blood
pressure and blood lipids among
vegetarian, semivegetarian, and
nonvegetarian African Americans. Am J
Clin Nutr. 1994;59: 103-109.
120. Toohey ML, Harris MA, DeWitt W, Foster
G, Schmidt WD, Melby CL. Cardiovascular
disease risk factors are lower in
African-American vegans compared to
lacto-ovovegetarians. J Am Coll Nutr.
1998;17:425-434.
121. Berkow SE, Barnard ND. Blood pressure
regulation and vegetarian diets. Nutr Rev.
2005;63:1-8.
122.Appel LJ, Moore TJ, Obarzanek E, Vollmer
WM, Svetkey LP, Sacks FM, Bray GA, Vogt
TM, Cutler JA, Windhauser MM, Lin PH,
Karanja NA. A clinical trial of the effects of
dietary patterns on blood pressure. N Eng
J Med. 1997;336:1117-1124.
123.Sacks FM, Appel LJ, Moore TJ, Obarzanek
E, Vollmer WM, Svetkey LP, Bray GA,
Vogt TM, Cutler JA, Windhauser MM, Lin
PH, Karanja Nl. A dietary approach
to prevent hypertension: A review
of the Dietary Approaches to Stop
Hypertension (DASH) study. Clin Cardiol.
1999;22(suppl):III6-III10.
124.American Dietetic Association
Hypertension Evidence Analysis Project.
American Dietetic Association Evidence
Analysis Library Web site. http://www.
adaevidencelibrary.com/conclusion.
cfm?conclusion_statement_id250681.
Accessed March 17, 2009.
125. Snowdon DA, Phillips RL. Does a
vegetarian diet reduce the occurrence of
diabetes? Am J Public Health.
1985;75:507-512.
126. Vang A, Singh PN, Lee JW, Haddad EH.
Meats, processed meats, obesity, weight
gain and occurrence of diabetes among
adults: findings from the Adventist Health
Studies. Ann Nutr Metab. 2008;52:96-104.
127.Song Y, Manson JE, Buring JE, Liu S. A
prospective study of red meat consumption
and type 2 diabetes in middle-aged and
elderly women: The women’s health study.
Diabetes Care. 2004;27:2108-2115.
128.Fung TT, Schulze M, Manson JE, Willett
WC, Hu FB. Dietary patterns, meat intake,
and the risk of type 2 diabetes in women.
Arch Intern Med. 2004;164:2235-2240.
129.Jiang R, Manson JE, Stampfer MJ, Liu S,
Willett WC, Hu FB. Nut and peanut butter
consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes in
women. JAMA. 2002;288:2554-2560.
130.Jenkins DJ, Kendall CW, Marchie A,
Jenkins AL, Augustin LS, Ludwig DS,
Barnard ND, Anderson JW. Type 2 diabetes
and the vegetarian diet. Am J Clin Nutr.
2003;78 (suppl):610S-616S.
131.Villegas R, Shu XO, Gao YT, Yang G, Elasy
T, Li H, Zheng W. Vegetable but not fruit
consumption reduces the risk of type 2
diabetes in Chinese women. J Nutr. 2008;
138:574-580.
132.Villegas R, Gao YT, Yang G, Li HL, Elasy
TA, Zheng W, Shu XO. Legume and soy
food intake and the incidence of type 2
diabetes in the Shanghai Women’s Health
Study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008;87:162-167.
133.McKeown NM. Whole grain intake
and insulin sensitivity: Evidence
from observational studies. Nutr Rev.
2004;62:286-291.
134.Rave K, Roggen K, Dellweg S, Heise T, tom
Dieck H. Improvement of insulin resistance
after diet with a whole-grain based dietary
product: Results of a randomized, controlled
cross-over study in obese subjects
with elevated fasting blood glucose. Br J
Nutr. 2007;98:929-936.
135.Venn BJ, Mann JI. Cereal grains, legumes,
and diabetes. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004;58:
1443-1461.
136.Bazzano LA, Li TY, Joshipura KJ, Hu FB.
Intake of fruit, vegetables, and fruit juices
and risk of diabetes in women. Diabetes
Care. 2008;31:1311-1317.
137.Waldmann A, Strohle A, Koschizke JW,
Leitzmann C, Hahn A. Overall glycemic
index and glycemic load of vegan diets in
relation to plasma lipoproteins and
triacylglycerols. Ann Nutr Metab. 2007;51:
335-344.
138. Barnard ND, Cohen J, Jenkins DJA,
Turner-McGrievy G, Gloede L, Jaster B,
Seidl K, Green AA, Talpers S. A low-fat
vegan diet improves glycemic control and
cardiovascular risk factors in a randomized
clinical trial in individuals with Type 2
diabetes. Diabetes Care. 2006;29:1777-1783.
139.Appleby PN, Thorogood M, Mann JI, Key
TJ. The Oxford Vegetarian Study: An
overview. Am J Clin Nutr. 1999;70(suppl):
525S-531S.
140.Spencer EA, Appleby PN, Davey GK, Key
TJ. Diet and body-mass index in 38000
EPIC-Oxford meat-eaters, fish-eaters,
vegetarians, and vegans. Int J Obes Relat
Metab Disord. 2003;27:728-734.
141. Rosell M, Appleby P, Spencer E, Key T.
Weight gain over 5 years in 21,966
meateating, fish-eating, vegetarian, and
vegan men and women in EPIC-Oxford.
Int J Obesity. 2006;30:1389-1396.
142. Turner-McGrievy GM, Barnard ND, Scialli
AR. A two-year randomized weight loss
trial comparing a vegan diet to a
more moderate low-fat diet. Obesity.
2007;15:2276-2281.
143.World Cancer Research Fund. Food,
Nutrition, Physical Activity, and the
Prevention of Cancer: A Global Perspective.
Washington, DC: American Institute for
Cancer Research; 2007.
144. Dewell A, Weidner G, Sumner MD, Chi CS,
Ornish D. A very-low-fat vegan diet
increases intake of protective dietary
factors and decreases intake of pathogenic
dietary factors. J Am Diet Assoc.
2008;108:347-356.
145.Khan N, Afaq F, Mukhtar H. Cancer
chemoprevention through dietary
antioxidants: Progress and promise.
Antioxid Redox Signal. 2008;10:475-510.
146.Béliveau R, Gingras D. Role of nutrition in
preventing cancer. Can Fam Physician.
2007;53:1905-1911.
147.Pierce JP, Natarajan L, Caan BJ, Parker
BA, Greenberg ER, Flatt SW, Rock CL,
Kealey S, Al-Delaimy WK, Bardwell WA,
Carlson RW, Emond JA, Faerber S, Gold
EB, Hajek RA, Hollenbach K, Jones LA,
Karanja N, Madlensky L, Marshall J,
Newman VA, Ritenbaugh C, Thomson CA,
Wasserman L, Stefanick ML. Influence of
a diet very high in vegetables, fruit, and
fiber and low in fat on prognosis following
treatment for breast cancer: The Women’s
Healthy Eating and Living (WHEL)
randomized trial. JAMA. 2007;298:289-298.
148. Lila MA. From beans to berries and
beyond: Teamwork between plant chemicals
for protection of optimal human health.
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2007;1114:372-380.
149. Liu RH. Potential synergy of
phytochemicals in cancer prevention:
Mechanism of action. J Nutr.
2004;134(suppl):3479S-3485S.
150. Wallig MA, Heinz-Taheny KM, Epps DL,
Gossman T. Synergy among phytochemicals
within crucifers: Does it translate into
chemoprotection? J Nutr. 2005;135(suppl):
2972S-2977S.
151. Jacobs DR, Marquart L, Slavin J, Kushi
LH. Whole-grain intake and cancer: An
expanded review and meta-analysis. Nutr
Cancer. 1998;30:85-96.
152. Key TJ, Appleby PN, Rosell MS. Health
effects of vegetarian and vegan diets. Proc
Nutr Soc. 2006;65:35-41.
153. Allen NE, Key T, Appleby PN, Travis RC,
Roddam AW, Tjønneland A, Johnsen NF,
Overvad K, Linseisen J, Rohrmann S,
Boeing H, Pischon T, Bueno-de-Mesquita
HB, Kiemeney L, Tagliabue G, Palli D,
Vineis P, Tumino R, Trichopoulou A,
Kassapa C, Trichopoulos D, Ardanaz E,
Larrañaga N, Tormo MJ, González CA,
Quirós JR, Sánchez MJ, Bingham S, Khaw
KT, Manjer J, Berglund G, Stattin P,
Hallmans G, Slimani N, Ferrari P, Rinaldi
S, Riboli E. Animal foods, protein, calcium
and prostate cancer risk: The European
Prospective Investigation into Cancer and
Nutrition. Br J Cancer. 2008;98:1574-1581.
154. Chan JM, Stampfer MJ, Ma J, Gann PH,
Garziano JM, Giovannucci EL. Dairy
products, calcium, and prostate cancer risk
in the Physician’s Health Study. Am J Clin
Nutr. 2001;74:549-554.
155. Tavani A, Gallus S, Franceschi S, La
Vecchia C. Calcium, dairy products,
and the risk of prostate cancer.
July 2009 Volume 109 Number 7 Journal of the AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION 1285
Prostate. 2001;48:118-121.
156. Koushik A, Hunter DJ, Spiegelman D,
Beeson WL, van den Brandt PA, Buring JE,
Calle EE, Cho E, Fraser GE, Freudenheim
JL, Fuchs CS, Giovannucci EL, Goldbohm
RA, Harnack L, Jacobs DR Jr, Kato I,
Krogh V, Larsson SC, Leitzmann MF,
Marshall JR, McCullough ML, Miller AB,
Pietinen P, Rohan TE, Schatzkin A, Sieri S,
Virtanen MJ, Wolk A, Zeleniuch-Jacquotte
A, Zhang SM, Smith-Warner SA. Fruits,
vegetables, and colon cancer risk in a
pooled analysis of 14 cohort studies. J Natl
Cancer Inst. 2007;99:1471-1483.
157. Bingham SA, Day NE, Luben R, Ferrari P,
Slimani N, Norat T, Clavel-Chapelon F,
Kesse E, Nieters A, Boeing H, Tjønneland
A, Overvad K, Martinez C, Dorronsoro M,
Gonzalez CA, Key TJ, Trichopoulou A,
Naska A, Vineis P, Tumino R, Krogh V,
Bueno-de-Mesquita HB, Peeters PH,
Berglund G, Hallmans G, Lund E, Skeie G,
Kaaks R, Riboli E; European Prospective
Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.
Dietary fibre in food and protection against
colorectal cancer in the European
Prospective Investigation into Cancer and
Nutrition (EPIC): An observational study.
Lancet. 2003;361:1496-1501.
158. Park Y, Hunter DJ, Spiegelman D,
Bergkvist L, Berrino F, van den Brandt PA,
Buring JE, Colditz GA, Freudenheim JL,
Fuchs CS, Giovannucci E, Goldbohm RA,
Graham S, Harnack L, Hartman AM,
Jacobs DR Jr, Kato I, Krogh V, Leitzmann
MF, McCullough ML, Miller AB, Pietinen
P, Rohan TE, Schatzkin A, Willett WC,
Wolk A, Zeleniuch-Jacquotte A, Zhang SM,
Smith-Warner SA. Dietary fiber intake and
risk of colorectal cancer. A pooled analysis
of prospective cohort studies. JAMA. 2005;
294:2849-2857.
159. Wu AH, Yu MC, Tseng CC, Pike MC.
Epidemiology of soy exposures and breast
cancer risk. Br J Cancer. 2008;98:9-14.
160. Messina MJ, Loprinzi CL. Soy for breast
cancer survivors: A critical review of the
literature. J Nutr. 2001;131(suppl):
3095S-3108S
161.Missmer SA, Smith-Warner SA,
Spiegelman D, Yaun SS, Adami HO, Beeson
WL, van den Brandt PA, Fraser GE,
Freudenheim JL, Goldbohm RA, Graham
S, Kushi LH, Miller AB, Potter JD, Rohan
TE, Speizer FE, Toniolo P, Willett WC, Wolk
A, Zeleniuch-Jacquotte A, Hunter DJ. Meat
and dairy food consumption and breast
cancer: A pooled analysis of cohort studies.
Int J Epidemiol. 2002;31:78-85.
162. Bessaoud F, Daurès JP, Gerber M. Dietary
factors and breast cancer risk: A case
control study among a population
in Southern France. Nutr Cancer.
2008;60:177-187.
163. New SA. Do vegetarians have a normal
bone mass? Osteporos Int. 2004;15:679-688.
164. Chiu JF, Lan SJ, Yang CY, Wang PW, Yao
WJ, Su LH, Hsieh CC. Long-term
vegetarian diet and bone mineral density in
postmenopausal Taiwanese women. Calcif
Tissue Int. 1997;60:245-249.
165. Lau EMC, Kwok T, Woo J, Ho SC. Bone
mineral density in Chinese elderly female
vegetarians, vegans, lacto-ovegetarians
and omnivores. Eur J Clin Nutr.
1998;52:60-64.
166. Chan HHL, Lau EMC, Woo J, Lin F, Sham
A, Leung PC. Dietary calcium intake,
physical activity and risk of vertebral
fractures in Chinese. Osteoporosis Int.
1996;6:228-232.
167. Hannan MT, Tucker KL, Dawson-Hughes
B, Cupples LA, Felson DT, Kiel DP. Effect
of dietary protein on bone loss in elderly
men and women: The Framingham
Osteoporosis Study. J Bone Miner Res.
2000;15: 2504-2512.
168. Outila TA, Karkkainen MU, Seppanen RH,
Lamberg-Allardt CJ. Dietary intake of
vitamin D in premenopausal, healthy
vegans was insufficient to maintain
concentrations of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin
D and intact parathyroid hormone within
normal ranges during the winter in
Finland. J Am Diet Assoc.
2000;100:434-441.
169. Krieger NS, Frick KK, Bushinsky DA.
Mechanism of acid-induced bone resorption.
Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens.
2004;13:423-436.
170. New SA. Intake of fruit and vegetables:
Implications for bone health. Proc Nutr
Soc. 2003;62:889-899.
171. Tucker KL, Hannan MT, Kiel DP. The
acidbase hypothesis: Diet and bone in the
Framingham Osteoporosis Study. Eur J
Nutr. 2001;40:231-237.
172. New SA, Bolton-Smith C, Grubb DA, Reid
DM. Nutritional influences on mineral
density: A cross-sectional study in
premenopausal women. Am J Clin Nutr.
1997;65:1831-1839.
173. Macdonald HM, New SA, Fraser WD,
Campbell MK, Reid DM. Low dietary
potassium intakes and high dietary
estimates of net endogenous acid
production are associated with low bone
mineral density in premenopausal women
and increased markers of bone resorption
in postmenopausal women. Am J Clin Nutr.
2005;81:923-933.
174. Itoh R, Nishiyama N, Suyama Y. Dietary
protein intake and urinary excretion
of calcium: A cross-sectional study in a
healthy Japanese population. Am J Clin
Nutr. 1998;67:438-444.
175. Sellmeyer DE, Stone KL, Sebastian A,
Cummings SR. A high ratio of dietary
animal to vegetable protein increases the
rate of bone loss and the risk of fracture in
postmenopausal women. Am J Clin Nutr.
2001; 73:118-122
176. Kerstetter JE, Svastisalee CM, Caseria
DM, Mitnick ME, Insogna KL. A threshold
for low-protein diet-induced elevations in
parathyroid hormone. Am J Clin Nutr.
2000;72:168-173.
177. Vergnaud P, Garnero P, Meunier PJ,
Breart G, Kamihagi K, Delmas PD.
Undercarboxylated osteocalcin measured
with a specific immunoassay predicts
hip fracture in elderly women: The
EPIDOS Study. J Clin Endocrinol Metab.
1997;82:719-724.
178. Szulc P, Arlot M, Chapuy MC, Duboeuf F,
Muenier PJ, Delmas PD. Serum
undercarboxylated osteocalcin correlates
with hip bone mineral density in elderly
women. J Bone Miner Res.
1994;9:1591-1595.
179. Feskanich D, Weber P, Willett WC, Rockett
H, Booth SL, Colditz GA. Vitamin K intake
and hip fractures in women: A prospective
study. Am J Clin Nutr. 1999;69:74-79.
180.Booth SL, Tucker KL, Chen H, Hannan
MT, Gagnon DR, Cupples LA, Wilson PWF,
Ordovas J, Schaefer EJ, Dawson-Hughes
B, Kiel DP. Dietary vitamin K intakes are
associated with hip fracture but not with
bone mineral density in elderly men and
women. Am J Clin Nutr.
2000;71:1201-1208.
181. Arjmandi BH, Smith BJ. Soy isoflavones’
osteoprotective role in postmenopausal
women: Mechanism of action. J Nutr
Biochem. 2002;13:130-137.
182. Ma DF, Qin LQ, Wang PY, Katoh R. Soy
isoflavone intake increases bone mineral
density in the spine of menopausal women:
Meta-analysis of randomized controlled
trials. Clin Nutr. 2008;27:57-64.
183. Marini H, Minutoli L, Polito F, Bitto A,
Altavilla D, Atteritano M, Gaudio A,
Mazzaferro S, Frisina A, Frisina N,
Lubrano C, Bonaiuto M, D’Anna R,
Cannata ML, Corrado F, Adamo EB, Wilson
S, Squadrito F. Effects of the phytoestrogen
genistein on bone metabolism in osteopenic
postmenopausal women: A randomized
trial. Ann Intern Med. 2007;146:839-847.
184. Ma DF, Qin LQ, Wang PY, Katoh R. Soy
isoflavone intake inhibits bone resorption
and stimulates bone formation in
menopausal women: Meta-analysis of
randomized controlled trials. Eur J Clin
Nutr. 2008;62:155-161.
185. Bernstein AM, Treyzon L, Li Z. Are
highprotein, vegetable-based diets safe for
kidney function? A review of the literature.
J Am Diet Assoc. 2007;107:644-650.
186. Giem P, Beeson WL, Fraser GE. The
incidence of dementia and intake of animal
products: Preliminary findings from the
Adventist Health Study.
Neuroepidemiology. 1993;12:28-36.
187. Luchsinger JA, Mayeux R. Dietary factors
and Alzheimer’s disease. Lancet Neurol.
2004;3:579-587.
188. Haan MN, Miller JW, Aiello AE, Whitmer
RA, Jagust WJ, Mungas DM, Allen LH,
Green R. Homocysteine, B vitamins, and
the incidence of dementia and cognitive
impairment: Results from the Sacramento
Area Latino Study on Aging. Am J Clin
Nutr. 2007;85:511-517.
189. Gear JS, Ware A, Fursdon P, Mann JI,
Nolan DJ, Broadribb AJ, Vessey MP.
Symptomless diverticular disease and
intake of dietary fibre. Lancet.
1979;1:511-514.
190. Aldoori WH, Giovannucci EL, Rimm EB,
Wing AL, Trichopoulos DV, Willett WC, A
prospective study of diet and the risk of
symptomatic diverticular disease in men.
Am J Clin Nutr. 1994;60:757-764.
191. Pixley F, Wilson D, McPherson K, Mann J.
Effect of vegetarianism on development of
gall stones in women. Br Med J (Clin Res
Ed). 1985:291:11-12.
192. Muller H, de Toledo FW, Resch KL. Fasting
followed by vegetarian diet in patients with
rheumatoid arthritis: A systematic review.
Scand J Rheumatol. 2001;30:1-10.
193. Special Supplemental Nutrition Program
for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC):
1286 Journal of the AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION
Notes des traducteurs
1 Il s’agit d’une banque de données
spécifique appartenant à l’ADA
2 Les Apports Nutritionnels
Conseillés (ANC) pour la
population française sont
l’équivalent des « Dietary Reference
Intakes » et des « Recommanded
Dietary Allowances », émises par
l’Institut de Médecine de Washington,
auxquelles il est fait référence
dans le document en anglais.
3 Aux États-Unis
4 Peu de produits sont enrichis en
France
5 En France on trouve le Marmite,
quelques laits de soja et céréales
enrichis, en plus de suppléments
vendus dans le commerce.
Cette position de l’Association américaine de diététique (ADA) a été
adoptée par l’Équipe de direction du Conseil le 18 octobre 1987, puis
réaffirmée le 12 septembre 1992, le 6 septembre 1996, le 22 juin 2000
et le 11 juin 2006. La présente position sera en vigueur jusqu’au 31
décembre 2013. L’ADA autorise la reproduction de cette position, dans
son intégralité, à condition d’en mentionner la source complète. Les
lecteurs peuvent copier et diffuser ce document, à condition que cette
diffusion ne serve pas de soutien à un produit ou à un service. Toute
diffusion à des fins commerciales sans l’autorisation de l’ADA est
interdite. Les demandes d’utilisation de tout ou partie de cette position
doivent être adressées au siège de l’ADA, au 800/877-1600, poste 4835,
ou à l’adresse suivante : ppapers@eatright.org.
Auteurs : Winston J. Craig, PhD, MPH, RD (Andrews University, Berrien
Springs, MI); Ann Reed Mangels, PhD, RD, LDN, FADA (The Vegetarian
Resource Group, Baltimore, MD).
Relecteurs : Pediatric Nutrition and Sports, Cardiovascular, and Wellness
Nutrition dietetic practice groups (Catherine Conway, MS, RD, YAI/
National Institute for People with Disabilities, New York, NY) ; Sharon
Denny, MS, RD (ADA Knowledge Center, Chicago, IL) ; Mary H. Hager,
PhD, RD, FADA (ADA Government Relations, Washington, DC) ; Vegetarian
Nutrition dietetic practice group (Virginia Messina, MPH, RD,
Nutrition Matters, Inc., Port Townsend, WA) ; Esther Myers, PhD, RD,
FADA (ADA Scientific Affairs, Chicago, IL) ; Tamara Schryver, PhD,
MS, RD (General Mills, Bloomington, MN) ; Elizabeth Tilak, MS, RD
(WhiteWave Foods, Inc, Broomfield, CO) ; Jennifer A. Weber, MPH, RD
(ADA Government Relations, Washington, DC).
Groupe de travail du comité des positions officielles de l’Association
: Dianne K. Polly, JD, RD, LDN (présidente) ; Katrina Holt, MPH,
MS, RD ; Johanna Dwyer, DSc, RD (conseillère rédactionnelle).
Les auteurs remercient les relecteurs pour leurs nombreux commentaires
et suggestions constructifs. Il n’a pas été demandé aux relecteurs
de cautionner la présente position ou le document qui s’y rattache.
Revisions in the WIC Food Packages;
Interim Rule. Federal Register. 7CFR, Part
246, Dec. 6, 2007;72:68966-69032.
194. Modification of the «Vegetable Protein
Products» requirements for the National
School Lunch Program, School Breakfast
Program, Summer Food Service Program
and Child And Adult Care Food Program.
(7 CFR 210,215,220,225,226) Federal
Register. March 9, 2000;65:12429-12442.
195. Accommodating children with special
needs in the School Nutrition Programs.
US Department of Agriculture, Food and
Nutrition Service Web site. http://www.
fns.usda.gov/cnd/Guidance/special_dietary_
needs.pdf. Posted Fall 2001. Accessed July
10,2008.
196. Healthy school lunches. 2007 school lunch
report card. Physicians Committee for
Responsible Medicine Web site. http://www.
healthyschoollunches.org/reports/
report2007_card.html. Posted August 2007.
Accessed July 10,2008.
197. Fluid milk substitutions in the School
Nutrition Programs. (7CFR Parts 210 and
220) Federal Register. September 12, 2008;
73:52903-52908.
198. Four-week vegetarian menu set for Meals
on Wheels Sites. The Vegetarian Resource
Group Web site. http://www.vrg.org/
fsupdate/fsu974/fsu974menu.htm. Posted
May 18,1998. Accessed July 10,2008.
199. Vegetarian menus. New York City
Department for the Aging Web site. http://
www.nyc.gov/html/dfta/downloads/pdf/
menu_vegetarian.pdf. Accessed January 19,
2009.
200. Ogden A, Rebein P. Do prison inmates have
a right to vegetarian meals? Vegetarian
Journal Mar/Apr 2001. The Vegetarian
Resource Group Web site. http://www.vrg.
org/journal/vj2001mar/2001marprison.htm.
Posted January 16,2001. Accessed July
10,2008.
201. Prison regulations by jurisdiction. Prison
Vegetarian Project Web site. http://www.
assistech.info/prisonvegetarian/index.html.
Accessed July 10,2008.
202. Federal Bureau of Prisons. Program
statement. Religious beliefs and practices.
US Dept of Justice Web site. http://www.
bop.gov/policy/progstat/5360_009.pdf.
Posted December 31,2004. Accessed July
10,2008.
203. Special briefing on Objective Force Warrior
and DoD Combat Feeding Program. May
23,2002. US Department of Defense Web
site. http://www.defenselink.mil/transcripts/
transcript.aspx?transcriptid3459. Accessed
July 10,2008.
204. Combat feeding directorate improves
meals. US Dept of Defense Web site. http://
www.defenselink.mil/transformation/
articles/2006-05/ta051506c.html. Accessed
July 10, 2008.
Sites Internet utiles en langue
française :
- Association Végétarienne de
France (AVF)
http://www.vegetarisme.fr/
- Association de Professionnels de
Santé pour une Alimentation
Responsable (APSARES)
http://www.alimentationresponsable.
com/
Si vous relevez des erreurs dans
la traduction, des fautes de français
ou de typographie, nous vous
encourageons à nous le signaler
en écrivant à contact@alimentationresponsable.
com. Vos remarques
seront éventuellement intégrées dans
une prochaine édition de ce document.
Ce document est dans sa
version 1.00
Signification des abréviations
- DSc: Docteur ès sciences
- FADA: Membre honoraire de l’ADA
- LDN: Diététicien/nutritionniste diplômé
- MPH: Diplômé en Santé publique
- MS: Diplômé ès sciences
- PhD: Docteur d’État
- RD: Diététicien diplômé d’État

4
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
saveallGOD'sAnimals
Admin


Masculin Nombre de messages : 19955
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme   Mar 18 Jan - 17:44

January 18, 2011

High blood pressure increases dementia risk

The small arteries of the brain are sensitive to elevations in blood pressure, and long-term hypertension carries the risk of injury to these small vessels, impairing blood flow and resulting in damage to or atrophy of brain tissue. As such, high blood pressure is hazardous to the brain, contributing to the development of vascular dementia, Alzheimer’s Disease, and cognitive impairment:1

• High diastolic blood pressure at age 50 predicts poorer cognitive function at age 70.2

• Even in younger subjects - 40 and under - higher blood pressure correlates with poorer cognitive performance.3

• An MRI study determined that higher systolic blood pressure is associated with white matter lesions - a type of damage to brain tissue that arises due to poor circulation and poses risk for dementia.4

• According to long-term (20-year) studies, the risk of Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia is more than doubled if systolic blood pressure is in or above the range of 140-160 mmHg.1

Most cognitive impairment is not age-related, it is lifestyle-related. Over many years, the Western diet combined with high blood pressure inflicts a great deal of damage on the brain's delicate small vessels. Keeping your blood pressure in the favorable range is an important step toward maintaining your brain function as you age.


Dr. Fuhrman's strategies for healthy blood pressure levels:

• Consume a diet based on whole plant foods.5

• Avoid salt, alcohol, and caffeine.6-8

• Maintain a healthy weight.9

• Exercise regularly.10




1 Nagai, M., S. Hoshide, and K. Kario, Hypertension and dementia. Am J Hypertens, 2010. 23(2): p. 116-24.
2 Kilander, L., et al., Hypertension is related to cognitive impairment: a 20-year follow-up of 999 men. Hypertension, 1998. 31(3): p. 780-6.
3 Suhr, J.A., J.C. Stewart, and C.R. France, The relationship between blood pressure and cognitive performance in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). Psychosom Med, 2004. 66(3): p. 291-7.
4 Kuller, L.H., et al., Relationship of hypertension, blood pressure, and blood pressure control with white matter abnormalities in the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study (WHIMS)-MRI trial. J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich), 2010. 12(3): p. 203-12.
5 Utsugi, M.T., et al., Fruit and vegetable consumption and the risk of hypertension determined by self measurement of blood pressure at home: the Ohasama study. Hypertens Res, 2008. 31(7): p. 1435-43.
6 Sesso, H.D., et al., Alcohol consumption and the risk of hypertension in women and men. Hypertension, 2008. 51(4): p. 1080-7.
7 Sacks, F.M., et al., Effects on blood pressure of reduced dietary sodium and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet. DASH-Sodium Collaborative Research Group. N Engl J Med, 2001. 344(1): p. 3-10.
8 Winkelmayer, W.C., et al., Habitual caffeine intake and the risk of hypertension in women. JAMA, 2005. 294(18): p. 2330-5.
9 Bogaert, Y.E. and S. Linas, The role of obesity in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Nat Clin Pract Nephrol, 2009. 5(2): p. 101-11.
10 Pescatello, L.S., Exercise and hypertension: recent advances in exercise prescription. Curr Hypertens Rep, 2005. 7(4): p. 281-6.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
saveallGOD'sAnimals
Admin


Masculin Nombre de messages : 19955
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme   Mar 18 Jan - 18:16

NOVEMBER 23, 2010

LAST CHANCE TO SAVE !

Sale ends November 30, 2010
Dr. Fuhrman's Weekend Immersion
January 14-16, 2011
*see below for details



Seven lectures presented by Dr. Fuhrman that will transform your thinking about health and disease;
Dr. Fuhrman's great-tasting high nutrient cuisine at every meal that is sure to satisfy;
Recipe and menu planning instruction that will inspire and spark your culinary skills;
Exercise classes
A warm, friendly environment to make connections, build relationships, gain knowledge to control the future of your health and have fun!

When you leave stay connected by receiving a:
FREE 1 month subscription to Dr. Fuhrman's Member Support Center


Dr. Fuhrman's Weekend Immersion at

The Westin Princeton
at Forrestal Village
201 Village Boulevard
Princeton, New Jersey 08540

Space is Limited!
All Inclusive Package
3 day/2 night stay with all meals and lectures

Specials!*
Includes Lodging

Single Occupancy: $995 $845
*Register before November 30th

Double Occupancy: $945 $795
*Register before November 30th

The Commuter Package
Excludes Lodging
If you live in the area and are not interested in staying overnight,
join us for the full weekend experience without the room accommodations

$695

Click Here For More Information or to Register


Enjoy 3 Days and 2 Nights at the Westin Princeton in the prestigious Forrestal Village
Daily lectures presented by Dr. Fuhrman on the latest nutritional research
Dr. Fuhrman's Eat For Health cuisine at every meal
Cooking instruction
Exercise classes
Discussion groups to support you in a Nutritarian lifestyle
1 Month Complimentary Dr. Fuhrman Online Support Center Membership
Health club with whirlpool and sauna
Heated indoor swimming pool
Elegantly designed accommodations featuring Westin's signature Heavenly Bed and Heavenly Bath.


Includes a private screening of the movie,
Fat, Sick and Nearly Dead
A Joe Cross Film
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
saveallGOD'sAnimals
Admin


Masculin Nombre de messages : 19955
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme   Mar 18 Jan - 18:25

January 7, 2011

DHA boosts learning and memory in older adults.

Omega-3 fatty acids are essential fats, important for the proper function of the heart and brain, and we must get them from our diets because the human body cannot synthesize them. A small percentage of the shorter omega 3 fats found in seeds can be converted into the longer-chain fats, notably DHA. Even if sufficient short chain omega-3 is consumed, the problem is that this conversion (into DHA) can decline with age and vary between individuals making it impossible to guarantee optimal levels throughout life, even with a good diet. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is a long-chain omega-3 fatty acid, crucial for ea rly brain development, and reduced DHA intake and blood DHA are associated with age-related cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease. 1

A recent study tested whether DHA supplements could improve brain function in adults with mild age-related cognitive decline: subjects were given either 900 mg/day DHA or placebo for six months, and learning and memory tests were performed before and after the supplementation period; the DHA group did indeed show improvements in learning and memory.2, 3 The most important message of this study is that DHA is effective when taken preventively. The subjects in this study had mild cognitive impairment; in contrast, a similar study published earlier this year tested the effects of DHA on subjects who had already been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, and did not show any benefit.4 If there were measurable learning and memory differences in subjects who already had mild cognitive impairment, it is reasonable to assume that the benefits of supplementing with DHA preventively, for longer periods and before any symptoms arise, would be even more eff ective. Alzheimer's and other types of dementia are devastating to both patients and their loved ones, but we can protect ourselves with excellent nutrition and intelligent supplementation. Taking a DHA supplement assures that all of us can maintain sufficient quantities of this valuable fat in brain tissue as we age. Taking even 100 mg of DHA per day, over time, has been shown to normalize cell membrane stores of DHA.5

According to this research, taking a DHA supplement regularly (to complement a high-nutrient diet) will help us to remain thinking clearly into old age.

Although fish and fish oils contain DHA, the safest and most sustainable form of DHA is derived from algae. Dr. Fuhrman's DHA Purity is a natural vegan (algae) source of DHA, and is produced under strict manufacturing conditions to assure purity and then refrigerated to maintain freshness. A little DHA each day may be important for your long-term health.



1 Yurko-Mauro, K., Cognitive and cardiovascular benefits of docosahexaenoic acid in aging and cognitive decline. Curr Alzheimer Res, 2010. 7(3): p. 190-6.
2 Yurko-Mauro, K., et al., Beneficial effects of docosahexaenoic acid on cognition in age-related cognitive decline. Alzheimers Dement, 2010.
3 DHA Improves Memory and Cognitive Function in Older Adults, Study Suggests. ScienceDaily, 2010.
4 Quinn, J.F., et al., Docosahexaenoic acid supplementation and cognitive decline in Alzheimer disease: a randomized trial. JAMA, 2010. 304(17): p. 1903-11.
5 Geppert, J., et al., Docosahexaenoic acid supplementation in vegetarians effectively increases omega-3 index: a randomized trial. Lipids, 2005. 40(Cool: p. 807-14.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
saveallGOD'sAnimals
Admin


Masculin Nombre de messages : 19955
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme   Mar 18 Jan - 18:27

January 7, 2011

Benefits of DHA

DHA benefits nervous system function, cardiovascular health, and more
The omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is known for its importance for healthy brain function and cardioprotection. Ongoing research continues to find additional benefits of DHA supplementation.

What Vegans may be Missing - DHA
Those not consuming fatty fish may be deficient in a critical and essential nutrients - especially EPA & DHA the long-chain omega-3 fatty acids


Lack of DHA linked to Parkinsons Disease
Recent scientific findings show diets rich in omega-3 fatty acids, in particular DHA, have a protective effect on this type of neurodegenerative disease.

Healthy Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Omega-3 fatty acids are healthy fats that reduce inflammation, inhibit cancer development and protect our blood vessels.

Chewing the Fat on Fatty Acids and Fish Oils
DHA oils are essential to a healthy diet. Several studies have shown that principle sources of DHA are prone to contain high concentrations of toxic compounds. Discover a healthy source of this necessary nutrient.


http://drfuhrman.com/library/benefits_dha.aspx
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
saveallGOD'sAnimals
Admin


Masculin Nombre de messages : 19955
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: Re: vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme   Mar 18 Jan - 18:29

January 7, 2011

DHA benefits nervous system function,
cardiovascular health, and more
The omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is known for its importance for healthy brain function and cardioprotection. Ongoing research continues to substantiate these claims and find additional benefits of DHA supplementation.

Just this past year, scientists attributed the following benefits to DHA:

Proper response to sensory stimuli: A new study published in the journal Behavioral Neuroscience examined the relationship between omega-3 fatty acid intake and the nervous system's ability to handle sensory input – a function called sensorimotor gating (Fedorova). Mice were fed diets containing either ALA only or ALA + EPA + DHA. The mice were evaluated on their responses to a loud noise following a soft tone – in normal sensorimotor gating, the soft tone acts as a warning so that the animal is not startled by the loud noise. The mice fed ALA + EPA + DHA had a 12% increase in brain DHA content and displayed improved sensorimotor gating – they responded more calmly to the loud noise.1 Inadequate sensorimotor gating is central to human disorders like schizophrenia and ADHD - children with ADHD have reduced DHA levels2, and DHA has been shown to improve the symptoms of ADHD.3

Cognitive development in infants: DHA makes up 90% of the omega-3 fatty acid content of the brain, and is a major component of brain cell membranes. Since DHA is crucial during development of the brain, adequate DHA intake is important for pregnant and nursing women. Previous studies documenting improved cognitive skills in breastfed infants have attributed this to the DHA content of breast milk. A new study has confirmed these observations. Infants were fed formula with or without supplemental DHA – when they reached 9 months of age, the babies given DHA scored higher on a problem solving test.4

Keeping arteries clear: The oxidized form of LDL cholesterol contributes to the formation of atherosclerotic plaque. DHA supplementation in healthy, middle-aged men had antioxidant effects on LDL.5

Reducing inflammation: Men who took DHA supplements for 6-12 weeks decreased the concentrations of several inflammatory markers in their blood by approximately 20%.6-7

Cancer protection: DHA and EPA induced programmed cell death in colon cancer cells8 and prostate cancer cells9, and DHA supplementation reduced tumor size in a mouse model of cancer.10

Slowing the aging process: It had already been shown that heart disease patients with higher intakes of DHA and EPA survived longer. A new study has found that higher intake of these omega-3 fatty acids was associated with slower rate of telomere shortening, which is a DNA-level sign of aging.11

Why take algae-based DHA instead of fish oil?

All over the earth, the major fisheries are in crisis. Yet, claims about fish and heart health have increased the demand for both fish and fish oils - this demand cannot be met by the world's current supply. In 2003, it was estimated that large predatory fish populations had declined 90% since the 1950s.12 Plus, most farmed fish are fed a diet of smaller, wild fish, driving wild fish stocks down further.13 Algae-based DHA is a more sustainable option, and it is free of the environmental pollutants that accumulate in the fatty tissue of fish, like mercury, PCBs, and dioxin.


Dr. Fuhrman's DHA Purity

Dr. Fuhrman's DHA Purity is unique. This vegetable-derived formula was developed to maximize purity and freshness and is entirely vegan. We buy the highest quality most concentrated form of DHA, package them in dark glass (not plastic) and then keep the bottles refrigerated so that the oil does not become rancid or oxidized. You will certainly taste the freshness DHA Purity when it hits your tongue. You simply can't get a better tasting, fresher DHA anywhere!



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

References:
1.American Psychological Association (2009, December 19). New study links DHA type of omega-3 to better nervous-system function. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091216130718.htm Fedorova I et al. Deficit in prepulse inhibition in mice caused by dietary n-3 fatty acid deficiency. Behav Neurosci. 2009 Dec;123(6):1218-25.
2. Colter AL et al. Fatty acid status and behavioural symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in adolescents: a case-control study. Nutr J. 2008 Feb 14;7:8.
3. Richardson AJ, Puri BK. A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the effects of supplementation with highly unsaturated fatty acids on ADHD-related symptoms in children with specific learning difficulties. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 2002;26(2):233-239.
4. Society for Research in Child Development (2009, September 17). Supplementing Babies' Formula With DHA Boosts Cognitive Development, Study Finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 21, 2009, from http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090915100945.htm
5. Calzada C et al. Subgram daily supplementation with docosahexaenoic acid protects low-density lipoproteins from oxidation in healthy men. Atherosclerosis. 2009 Aug 3. [Epub ahead of print]
6. Kelley DS et al. DHA supplementation decreases serum C-reactive protein and other markers of inflammation in hypertriglyceridemic men. J Nutr. 2009 Mar;139(3):495-501. Epub 2009 Jan 21.
7. Bloomer RJ et al. Effect of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid on resting and exercise-induced inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers: a randomized, placebo controlled, cross-over study. Lipids in Health and Disease 2009, 8:36
8. Giros A et al. Regulation of colorectal cancer cell apoptosis by the n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids Docosahexaenoic and Eicosapentaenoic. Cancer Prev Res (Phila Pa). 2009 Aug;2(Cool:732-42. Epub 2009 Jul 28.
9. Anderson BM et al. Are all n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids created equal? Lipids in Health and Disease 2009
10. El-Mesery M et al. Chemopreventive and renal protective effects for docosahexaenoic acid (DHA): implications of CRP and lipid peroxides. Cell Div. 2009 Apr 2;4:6.
11. Farzaneh-Far R et al. Association of Marine Omega-3 Fatty Acid Levels With Telomeric Aging in Patients With Coronary Heart DiseaseJAMA. 2010;303(3):250-257.
12. Myers RA Worm B. Rapid worldwide depletion of predatory fish communities. Nature 423, 280-283 (15 May 2003)
13. Jenkins D et al. Are dietary recommendations for the use of fish oils sustainable? CMAJ 180 (6): 633. (2009)
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme   Aujourd'hui à 2:38

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
vegetarianismo estricto / strict vegetarianism / végétalisme
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 5 sur 8Aller à la page : Précédent  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Suivant
 Sujets similaires
-
» Le végétalisme ?
» Le végétalisme
» Strict minimum pour l'élevage d'artemias ?
» Végétalisme
» Cours de diététique pour végétaliens

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
 :: Divers :: Les infos de Végétalienne-
Sauter vers: