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Masculin Nombre de messages : 19960
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2007

MessageSujet: WILDLIFE   Dim 24 Mar - 3:00

MARCH 22 2013

Immediate Action Needed: Attack on ESA Underway!

http://action.defenders.org/site/Survey?ACTION_REQUIRED=URI_ACTION_USER_REQUESTS&SURVEY_ID=29600


Extremists in Congress have launched a sweeping assault on the Endangered Species Act (ESA). They are using the budget process as their excuse for this appalling attack!.

VOTES ON FIVE OR MORE AMENDMENTS THAT COULD CRIPPLE THE ESA COULD COME AS EARLY AS THIS AFTERNOON!

Please call your senators and demand that they vote no on all ESA and wildlife amendments.

Among the horrific amendments that have been proposed:

A proposal by anti-conservation crusader James Inhofe to place endangered species protection back into the hands of states. We’ve all seen how well that has worked with wolves in the Northern Rockies!
Restrictions that would dramatically reduce the ability to protect hundreds of new species under the ESA before the year 2022;
A special interest amendment to defund protection for the threatened Utah prairie dog potentially undoing decades of work to recover them; and,
Restrictions on funding recovery and conservation efforts for the imperiled Gunnison’s and greater sage grouse;
This is nothing short of a back door attack on the ESA and America’s wildlife conservation efforts. We must stop it now!

Please call your senators and demand that they vote no on all ESA and wildlife amendments to the budget resolution.

Sincerely,
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MessageSujet: Re: WILDLIFE   Sam 30 Mar - 3:40

march 29 2013

Making your home Wildlife friendly
Posted by Sophia Wale (cause founder)

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Now that spring is finally taking hold here in Canada, Its now the time of year where urban wildlife is most abundant and vulnerable. As a volunteer at my local wildlife rehab, this is unfortunately the time of year we see a lot of babies in our care. So im just going to offer up a few tips on what to do in case you happen across an emergency.

1. Babies: If you find a baby bird that appears to have fallen from his nest, do not touch it, unless you know which nest it is from, in which case, put him back or make a temporary nest near where you beleive the original nest is. Mum is usually near by to help her babies but giving her that little extra helping hand won't do any harm. It is common belief that if you touch a baby, the mother will disown it, that is not true! Mothers will go to any lengths for her children, simply touching them will not discourage her. That being said, unless absolutely necessary, handling should be avoided. As far as orphans go, what you think is orphaned, may not be. As previously stated mum stays close by, coming back for regular feeds (except rabbits, they feed their babies during the night, however the mother will remain close to her nest at all times and is usually easy to spot in a neighbourhood). Keep an eye on the nest, if it doesn't appear to have been disturbed or the parents haven't been flying back to feed then call your local Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre

2. Sick and Injured: You should call your local Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre immediately if you find a sick or injured animal. They will give you the best advice in your situation. Do not try to nurse the animal yourself. There may be laws in your area that prevent wild animals from being kept on your property without the proper permits. Not only that, but you are putting yourself at risk of many diseases. In these cases, it is best to let a professional handle it.

3. Unwanted guests: If you suspect you have unwanted lodgers in your house, it is best to call a humane wildlife removal service to deal with the problem. Preventing this from happening is also key. Make sure to seal off all outdoor garbage cans, remove all possible food sources raccoons and skunks would be attracted to (i.e, any cat food left out for hedgehogs and foxes), wildlife proof any possible hole that could be used as an entrance to your house and put up deterrents ( bright lights and loud music at the point of access works wonders)

Here are a few links for more information:

http://links.causes.com/s/clJLXP?r=yf0H

http://links.causes.com/s/clJLXQ?r=yf0H

http://links.causes.com/s/clJLXR?r=yf0H

http://links.causes.com/s/clJLXS?r=yf0H
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MessageSujet: Re: WILDLIFE   Sam 11 Mai - 7:17

MAY 10th 2013

http://www.africat.org/

CHEETAHS? lions, leopards ect
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MessageSujet: Re: WILDLIFE   Mer 26 Juin - 12:35

On the Line: Walls, Waivers and Wildlife
Matt Clark | Posted on 06 June 2013 | Tags: bighorn sheep, border wall, borderlands, desert tortoise, habitat, immigration, wildlife

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Matt Clark, Southwest Representative
I once spotted and photographed a family of javelinas on the U.S./Mexico border near the San Pedro River in southeast Arizona. Through my camera lens, I watched the silhouette of an adult javelina cautiously approach the ominous border wall, and stop with a grunt. It was a haunting image. I can’t pretend to know what natural instinct brought the javelina to the border that day, but seeing those wild creatures literally cut off from their habitat by a steel wall stretching on for miles beyond sight – it really stuck with me.
Border Wall, Matt Clark
A lone animal faces the impenetrable border wall. (Photo: Matt Clark, Defenders of Wildlife)
Ironically, on a prior visit to this same location, I was guided by a local landowner to a spot where someone had used a simple nylon rope to scale and defeat the wall in seconds. Walls, no matter how tall and well-reinforced, will never succeed in keeping determined people from crossing the border illegally. Sadly though, these same walls will, and do, stop wildlife in their tracks, denying them the territory, resources and genetic exchange they need in order to survive and adapt in the arid environment of the borderlands.
A scientific study I contributed to, published in Conservation Biology in 2009, concluded that dispersal movements and population dynamics of many wildlife species could be significantly affected by security infrastructure, especially those species that are land-bound and large enough for walls to keep them out, those that fly at heights lower than 13 feet as they disperse, or those that rely on continuous habitat for cover or perches. Just a small sample of species whose transboundary movements could be further compromised by barriers and other developments at the border include desert bighorn sheep, mountain lion, black bear, desert tortoise, pronghorn, pygmy owl, wild turkey and the endangered jaguar and ocelot.
Unfortunately, when crafting border security-related legislation in the past, many in Congress have ignored major environmental concerns and have trampled the rule of law itself in their zeal to seal the border. In 2005, Congress passed a controversial provision in the Real ID Act (Section 102) to waive dozens of laws in order to construct hundreds of miles of damaging border walls and roads. The 37 laws that were swept under the mat include bipartisan legislation passed to protect public health, farmland, Native American graves and freedoms, historic sites, wildlife and other sensitive natural resources. This unprecedented waiver authority, which allows a political appointee – the Secretary of Homeland Security — to waive any and all laws of the United States, has resulted in avoidable and expensive environmental and property damage, created numerous safety hazards, and has harmed interagency cooperation and trust.
Bighorn sheep are just one of many species that would be put at risk by these severe budget cuts. (Photo: Sandy Sisti)
Bighorn sheep are just one of many species that are put at risk by the borderlines. (Photo: Sandy Sisti)
A poll conducted by YouGov in 2011 found that 64% of those polled oppose giving the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) discretion to waive environmental and other laws to build border infrastructure, and an identical number oppose congressional efforts to permanently waive such laws for border security. This same poll found that the vast majority of Americans (92%) strongly prefer beefing up efforts at the Ports of Entry over spending billions of dollars on hundreds of miles of fencing in between the Ports.
The past damage done is bad enough, but now new threats are coming into play. Specific provisions in the immigration reform bill (S. 744) introduced into the Senate, run counter to public opinion and common sense. The current version of S.744 would force DHS to develop a separate “Southern Border Fencing Strategy” and spend hundreds of millions to build yet more ineffective, environmentally harmful border walls. A very problematic provision in S. 744 would also further expand the existing waiver authority, enabling DHS to operate above the law for all border infrastructure and operations along the Southwest border, including building a sprawling network of forward operating bases, checkpoints, security camera tower s, roads and bright night lighting along the border and interior. Collectively, this would add up to an unregulated, unmitigated environmental disaster with no accountability whatsoever. To avoid such foreseeable folly, immigration reform legislation should be stripped of provisions that would enable walls and waivers. The proposal in S.744 for an even more expansive waiver is an unnecessary overreach – federal agencies are already operating effectively under an interagency agreement in place since 2006 that enables Border Patrol to have ready access to all lands along the border – including in designated wilderness – when a situation necessitates it.
Border Wall, Matt Clark
The border wall extends for 670 miles, blocking wildlife from habitats. (Photo: Matt Clark, Defenders of Wildlife)
Even the current head of the DHS, Janet Napolitano, does not agree with the provision in S.744 that would dictate more wall building. When testifying before Congress on the provision that would require dedicated funding for more walls she said, “We would prefer having money not so designated so that we can look at technology, air-based, ground-based, manpower, other needs that may be more fitting to prevent illegal flows across the Southwest border.” This is the same reasoned voice who, as Arizona’s governor, bluntly stated: “You show me a 50-foot wall and I’ll show you a 51-foot ladder at the border. That’s the way the border works.”
What the border needs is not another set of ineffective, ecologically harmful walls and unpopular waivers, but rather more ingenuity and interagency collaboration that will foster the development of common sense, win-win solutions for both security and environmental concerns.
A 2010 report on interagency cooperation on U.S./Mexico border wilderness issues listed many successful efforts in the past where agencies have worked together to bolster border security. The report concludes: “The twin values of national security and public lands stewardship can be simultaneously fulfilled, but it will take continued interagency cooperation to assure this happens.” The practice of waiving laws as a means to an ends is counterproductive; doing so only serves to eliminate the critical public processes and damage the trust that enables such interagency cooperation to occur and thrive. As a nation, we can and must do better than walls and waivers. The future of our diverse borderlands region, and the wildlife it supports, depend on it.
Click here to tell your Senator to say NO to these dangerous provisions and protect borderland wildlife!
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MessageSujet: Re: WILDLIFE   Aujourd'hui à 17:28

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